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Author Topic: Obscure DCU Characters - Round VII
outpost2
Member
posted January 12, 2003 04:51 PM

Welcome to Round VII of Obscure DCU Characters. This thread serves as a Q&A forum focusing on DC's many obscure heroes and villains. Rounds I through VI have been archived at www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/msgboards and are available for download. If you're new to this topic, take a few moments to check out those previous threads. The Obscure DCU Characters list now stands at 537 characters. Those entries that have yet to be covered are marked with an asterisk.

1 Adam Strange II
2 the Adventurers' Club and Nelson Strong
3 Agent Orange
4 Air Wave II / Maser
5 Alan Scott's career
* 6 All-Star (Justice League Adventures #13)
* 7 Alpha the Experimental Man (1962) (Detective #307)
* 8 Arin the Armored Man (1970's/1990's) (Jimmy Olsen #146, Superman v2 #??)
9 Anakronus
10 Amanda Waller
11 Andrew Bennett (I...Vampire)
* 12 the Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man (Doom Patrol v1 #89,95)
13 the Ani-Men of Repli-Tech
* 14 the Annihilator and son (Action #355-357)
15 the Ant
16 Anti-Lad
17 Apache Chief
* 18 Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel) (Adventure #266)
* 19 Aquagirl II (Selena) (World's Finest v1 #133)
* 20 Aquagirl III (Tula) (Aquaman v1 #33, Crisis #10, more)
* 21 Aquarius (JLofA #74-75)
22 Arcana I (from New Talent Showcase)
23 Arcana II (from JLA)
24 the Archer
25 Argent
26 Arizona Raines / Arizona Ames
27 Arm-Fall-Off-Boy
28 Armstrong of the Army
* 29 the Arrows of Alaska (Adventure #260)
30 Arsenal (Nicholas Galtry)
31 the Asgardians
32 the Assassination Bureau
33 the Assemblers and the Justifiers
* 34 Astra, Girl of the Future (Sensation #99-103)
35 Astralad
36 Astro
37 Aten, Supreme God of the Sun
38 Atlas II
39 Atlas III
40 the Atomic Knight/ Shining Knight II
41 Automan
* 42 Azrael I (Tales Of The Teen Titans #52, more)
43 the Baffler / Headbanger
44 the Banshee II (Charlton Comics villain)
* 45 Bard the Rainmaker (Tales Of The Unexpected #??)
46 the Bat-Knights
* 47 Batman 2045-2050 (Hex #11-12)
48 the Bat Squad
49 the Beefeater I & II
* 50 Belphegor (See Item #101.)
51 Benedict Arnold
52 Billy the Kid
53 Binky
* 54 the Black Bat (Batman #600)
55 Blackbriar Thorn
56 Blackmask
57 Blackrock I - IV
* 58 Black Thorn (Vigilante #45, more)
59 Black Vulcan
60 Blackwing
61 Bloodlines aliens
62 BlueJay (See Item #33.)
63 Bob Colby and Jim Boone
64 Bob the Galactic Bum
65 Bomba the Jungle Boy
66 the Bombardiers
67 the Bottler
* 68 Brother Power the Geek (Brother Power The Geek #1, Swamp Thing v2 Annual #5, Vertigo Vision-The Geek #1, Totems #1)
69 Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun
* 70 the Bushmaster (See Item #101.)
* 71 B'wana Beast / Freedom Beast (See Item #101.)
72 Cannon and Saber
73 Capricorn
74 Captain Carrot and his amazing Zoo Crew
* 75 Captain Compass (Star-Spangled #83, more)
* 76 Captain Fear (Adventure #425-427,429,432,433, Unknown Soldier v1 #254-256, Spectre v3 #40-41, more?)
77 Captain Incredible
78 Captain Invincible
79 Captain Marvel (the android)
* 80 the Captains of Industry <-- needs more info
81 Captain Stingaree
82 Captain Strong
83 Captain Thunder
84 the Card Queen
* 85 Cascade (See Item #101.)
86 Cat Grant
* 87 Cathy Perkins (Wonder Woman v1 #184-187,194,203, more?)
88 C.A.W. (The Criminal Alliance of the World)
* 89 Centrix (See Item #101.)
* 90 the Chain Gang War (Chain Gang War #1-12)
91 the Changling I (Erik Razar)
92 the Changling II (of Krastl)
93 the Changling III (Gregor Nagy)
94 the Changling IV (of the Cartel)
95 the Changling V (Garfield Logan)
* 96 Chrysalis (See Item #101.)
97 Cinnamon
98 Class of 2064
* 99 Claw the Unconquered (Claw #1-12, Star Hunters #7, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Warlord v2 #48-49, Swamp Thing v2 #163)
100 the Clipper I & II
* 101 the Club of Heroes / the Global Guardians <-- needs more info
102 Codename: Assassin
* 103 Colonel Future (Superman v1 #378,399)
104 Commando Yank
* 105 the Conglomerate (JLQ #1,8,12, more)
106 Conjura
* 107 the Conqueror (Super Friends #45,46)
* 108 the Conqueror of Barren Earth (Warlord v1 #63-65,67-70,72-74,76-88, Conqueror Of Barren Earth #1-4)
* 109 the Cossack (Showcase #96???)
110 the Council
111 the Crimson Avenger II (Albert Elwood)
112 Croak McCraw, the Dead Detective
* 113 Crusader (Aquaman v1 #56)
114 the Crusaders (DC)
115 the Crusaders (Marvel)
116 Cryonic Man
117 the Cyclone Kids
118 Cyclotron II
119 Darius Tiko, the Wizard of Time
120 Davy Tenzer
* 121 the Dazzler (Green Lantern v2 #49)
122 the Deep Six
123 Destiny (of the Endless)
* 124 El Diablo (western hero) (All-Star Western v2 #2-5,7,10-11, Weird Western v1 #12-13,15-17,10, Jonah Hex #56-60, Swamp Thing v2 #85)
125 Dial 'H' for HERO
* 126 the Dingbats of Danger Street (1st Issue Special #6, Advs Of Superman #549)
127 Doctor Davis
* 128 Doctor Mist (See Item #101.)
129 Doctor-7
* 130 the Dogs of War (Hex #13-17)
131 El Dorado
132 El Dragón
133 the Duke of Deception
134 the Duke of Oil
135 Dyno-Man of Sorrta
* 136 Edge (Bloodlines)
137 the Elementals
138 Element Girl
* 139 the Eliminator (Action #379)
140 the Emerald Eye of Ekron
* 141 the Endless One (JLofA #??)
142 the Evil Eight
143 Executrix
144 the Extremists
* 145 Faith (JLA #69, more)
146 the Fargo Kid
147 the Fiend with Five Faces / the gods of Oceania
* 148 Fireball (Young All-Stars #22-26)
149 the Fire Ghosts
150 Firegirl
151 Fireman Farrell and the Firefighters
152 the Fire People
* 153 Firestar (???)
154 Flashback / Deja Vu
155 the Flash Dynasty
* 156 Fleur-de-lis (See Item #101.)
157 Flora, the Girl In The Golden Flower
158 the Flying Boots
159 the Flying Dutchman of Time
160 Foley of the Fighting Fifth
* 161 the Force of July (Batman And The Outsiders Annual #1, more)
162 the Forever Man
* 163 the Forgotten Heroes (Action #536,539,540,545,552,553, DC Comics Presents #77,78, Resurrection Man #24-27, Superman:MOS #120, more)
* 164 the Forgotten Villains (DC Comics Presents #77,78)
165 the Frankenstein Monster
166 the Freedom Brigade
167 the Frogmen
168 Funny Face
* 169 Futurio (Super Friends #39)
* 170 Futurio-XX (Super Friends #43)
171 Gadgeteer
172 Gangbusters
* 173 the Gaucho (See Item #101.)
174 Glenn Merritt
* 175 Godiva (See Item #101.)
176 the Golden Eagle
177 Golden Gladiator
178 Golden Pharaoh
* 179 Goody Rickles (Jimmy Olsen #139,141)
180 the Gorilla Wonders of the Diamond
* 181 Grax (Action #342, #417, Super Friends #7-9,38)
182 the Great Super-Star Game
183 the Green Arrows of the World
* 184 Greenback (Super Friends #5)
* 185 Green Fury / Green Flame / Fire (See Item #101.)
186 the Green Glob
187 Green Lantern Corps (30th century)
* 188 the Green Team (1st Issue Special #2, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Advs Of Superman #549)
* 189 Green Thumb (Super Friends #42)
190 Grockk, the Devil's Son
191 Grooble Man
192 Gudra the Valkyrie
* 193 the Hacker Files (Hacker Files #1-12, more?)
194 Halk Kar
* 195 Hayoth (Suicide Squad v1 #45, more)
* 196 Hazard (Infinity Inc #34-36, more)
197 Headhunter
198 Heckler
* 199 Helix (Infinity Inc. #17, more)
200 He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
201 Hercules I
202 Hercules II
203 Her Highness and Silk
204 the heroes of the Microcosmos
* 205 the Hero Group (JLQ #5)
206 Hero Hotline
207 Hilary and Kermit Hunt
208 the Homeless Avenger
* 209 Hook (Bloodlines)
210 Hoppy the Marvel Bunny
211 Human Cannonball
212 the Human Hurricane (Mitch Anderson)
* 213 the Human Target (Action #419, more)
214 the Hunchback
215 Huntress I (Paula Brooks), plus other Huntresses
* 216 the Hybrid (New Teen Titans v2 #24, more)
217 Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania
* 218 Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus (Superboy v1 #144)
219 Ibis the Invincible
* 220 Icemaiden I (See Item #101.)
* 221 Icemaiden II / Ice (See Item #101.)
222 the Image I (Angus Calhoun)
223 the Image II (Quality Comics villain)
224 the Image III (Charlton Comics villain)
225 the Image IIIA (Clay Kendall)
226 the Image IV (an Agent of Order)
* 227 Impala (See Item #101.)
228 the Inferior Five
* 229 the Intergalactic Patrol (Adventure #260)
230 the Intergalactic Vigilantes
231 Interplanetary Insurance, Inc.
232 Isis
233 Jack B. Quick / Johnny Quick II / Captain Speed (See Item #33.)
* 234 Jack O'Lantern I (See Item #101.)
* 235 Jack O'Lantern II (See Item #101.)
* 236 Jack O'Lantern III (Primal Force #0, 1-14)
* 237 Dr. Janet Kliburn of S.T.A.R. (various Superman titles)
238 Janus, Son of Jupiter
239 Jan Vern, Interplanetary Agent
* 240 Jason Bard (Detective #392, more)
241 Jason's Quest
* 242 Jediah Rikane I (Starman) (Adventure #467, more)
* 243 Jediah Rikane II / Power Lad / Power Boy (Adventure #354, Superboy & LSH #240, LSH v2 #304, LSH v3 #12,14, LSH v4 #15,17)
244 Jefferson Pierce / Black Lightning
* 245 Jeff Sloane (Adventure #413-415,419, Supergirl v1 #1-2, World's Finest #274-277, JLofA #202)
* 246 Jemm, Son of Saturn (Jemm #1-12, JLA #11-12,15, Martian Manhunter v2 #6,13-16, more)
247 Jero and Halk
248 Jezebelle (New Gods)
249 the Jihad
250 Jim Aparo of Earth-One
251 Jim Corrigan of Earth-One
252 Jody
* 253 Johnny Witts (Detective #344, Batman #201, Super Friends #26)
254 Jonna Crisp
* 255 Jonny Double (Showcase #78, more)
256 Joshua
* 257 Judge Kobold, The Twice-Cursed Man (Secrets Of Haunted House #31)
* 258 Justa Lotta Animals (Captain Carrot #14-15)
* 259 the Justice Experience (Chase #6; Martian Manhunter v2 #17,20,22,36)
260 Justice League headquarters
* 261 the "Justice League" of another world (Super Friends #10)
262 Kate Hunter
* 263 Kathy Warren (Superboy v1 #176, 191)
* 264 King Faraday (Danger Trail v1 #1, more)
* 265 Kingslayer (Super Friends #11)
266 Kings of the Wild
267 Kit Colby, Girl Sheriff
* 268 the Knight I and the Squire II (See Item #101.)
* 269 the Knights of the Galaxy (Mystery In Space #1-8)
270 Kolossal Kate
271 Kong the Untamed
* 272 Kraklow (Rip Hunter #28, DC Comics Presents #77-78)
* 273 Kuei (Young All-Stars #22-26)
274 Lady Cop
* 275 Lady Quark, Lord Volt, Princess Fern (Crisis #4, DC Comics Presents #94, Starman v1 #8, more)
276 Lady Quark II
* 277 Lando, Man of Magic (World's Best #1, World's Finest #2-7)
278 the Legion of the Weird
* 279 the Legionary (See Item #101.)
280 the Lightning Master
* 281 the Liquidator (Aquaman v1 #38)
* 282 the Little Mermaid (See Item #101.)
* 283 Little Miss Redhead (Sensation #72, more)
* 284 Lola Barnett (various Superman titles)
285 the Luck League
286 the Luck Lords
* 287 Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching (Wonder Woman v1 #179, more)
288 Madame Fatal
289 Mad Maestro(s) + Maestro(s)
290 Mad Mod Witch / the Fashion Thing
* 291 Malice (Female Furies) (???)
* 292 the Mamelukes (Suicide Squad v1 #45, more)
293 Manhunters Around the World
294 the Maniaks
* 295 Manitou Raven (JLA #66, more)
296 Mark Merlin
* 297 Marsboy (Superboy v1 #14, #16; Adventure #195)
298 Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
299 Masked Ranger
300 the Master Electrician
301 Master Jailer (pre-Crisis)
* 302 Matt Savage, Trail Boss (Western #77, more)
303 the Maze
* 304 the Menagerie Man (Super Friends #6,19,33)
* 305 Mento (Doom Patrol v1 #91, more)
306 the Mercenaries
307 Metalhead
308 Microwave Man
* 309 Mikola Rostov (Warlord v2 #47,62-68)
310 Mighty Boy and Mighty Dog of Zumoor
* 311 Mighty Man (???)
312 Mindgrabber Kid / Mind Eater
* 313 Minstrel Maverick (All-American Western #103-122,124-126)
314 Miss Arrowette
* 315 the Missile Men (Metal Men v1 #1,12,54,55, Metal Men v2 #3)
316 Miss X
317 Mr. Alpha
318 Mister Banjo
319 Mister E
320 Mister Originality
* 321 the Monocle (Super Friends #40)
322 Moonbow
323 the Moondancers
324 Mopee
* 325 the Musketeer (See Item #101.)
* 326 Mystek (Ray v2 #12, Justice League Task Force #30-#32)
* 327 Nadir, Master of Magic (New Adventure #17-30)
* 328 Naiad (Firestorm the Nuclear Man #90-93, more)
329 Nasthalthia "Nasty" Luthor
* 330 Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia (Action #354)
331 the New Guardians
332 Nighthawk
333 Nightmaster
334 Nightwolf
335 Nimrod the Hunter
* 336 Nubia (Wonder Woman v1 #204,205,206, Supergirl v1 #9, Super Friends #25)
* 337 Nu'bia (Wonder Woman v2 Annual #8, Wonder Woman v2 #154-155)
338 the Nuclear Family
339 Null and Void
340 the Odd Man
341 O.G.R.E. (the Organization for General Revenge and Enslavement)
* 342 the Olympian (See Item #101.)
343 One Man Meltdown / Cyclotronic Man / Bag O´Bones
* 344 Onyx (Green Arrow ally) (Detective #546, more)
* 345 Onyx (Deadman villain) (???)
346 the Oracle (cosmic entity)
347 O-Sensei
348 the Outlaw
349 the original Outsiders
350 the Overland Coach
* 351 Overlord I (Super Friends #11,14,15)
* 352 Overlord II / Underling (Super Friends #11,15,25,39,43)
* 353 Overthrow (Blue Beetle #17,20-21)
* 354 Owlwoman (See Item #101.)
355 Pandora Pan
356 Paragon
* 357 the People's Heroes (Outsiders v1 #10, more)
* 358 Petronius (Lois Lane #3)
* 359 Phantasmo (See Item #101.)
* 360 Phoenix of Steel (Superman Family #187)
361 the Planeteers
362 Power-Boy of the asteroid Juno
363 Power Elite
* 364 Power Lad (Jimmy Olsen #45)
* 365 Power-Man, King of Outer-Space (Lois Lane #??)
366 Pow-Wow Smith I & II
367 Prez
368 Primal Force
369 Prince Ra-Man
370 the Printer's Devil
371 Professor Brainstorm
372 Professor Menace / the Robot Master
373 Proletariat
* 374 Pulsar (Superboy foe) (New Adventures of Superboy #31)
* 375 Pulsar (Karate Kid foe) <-- needs more info
376 Pulsar Stargrave
377 Queen Arrow
378 the Queen Bee (Marcia Monroe), plus other Queen Bees
379 Ragman
380 Ramulus / Nightshade I
* 381 the Ranger (See Item #101.)
* 382 the Recombatants (Tales Of The Teen Titan #48)
383 the Redeemer
384 the original Red Tornado
* 385 Red Trinity / Blue Trinity (Flash v2 #6,7, more)
386 the Renegades
387 Rima the Jungle Girl
* 388 Ringmaster (Flash v1 #261-264)
* 389 the Rising Sun (See Item #101.)
390 the Rival
* 391 Robin Hood (Robin Hood Tales #1-14, B&B #5-15, more?)
392 Rodeo Rick
* 393 Rokk and Sorban the cosmic gamblers (Superman v1 #171, World's Finest #150, Flash v1 #175, DC Comics Presents #79, Action Comics #582)
394 Rose and Thorn (Silver Age)
395 the Roving Ranger
* 396 Roy Batty (???)
397 Ruby Ryder
398 S-64
399 Samson
400 Samuel Lane
401 Samurai
402 Sandman (1970s version)
403 Santa Claus
404 Scarab (Isis villain)
* 405 Scarab (hero) (Scarab #1-8, JSA #1-???)
406 Scarth
407 Secret Agent Woman
* 408 the Seraph (See Item #101.)
409 Sgt. Gorilla
410 Sgt. Rock family tree
411 the Seven Shadows
* 412 the Seven Soldiers of Victory / the Law's Legionnaires (golden age)
* 413 the Seven Soldiers of Victory (silver age) (Silver Age: Showcase #1, Silver Age Secret Files #1)
414 Shadowstryke
415 the Shark
416 Shark Norton
417 Shark Wilson
418 Sherlock Holmes
419 Sierra Smith
* 420 Silverblade (Silverblade #1-12)
421 Silver Fog I - III
422 Silver Sorceress (See Item #33.)
423 the Sino-Supermen
424 the Sizematic Twins
425 Skragg the Super Sniper
426 Skull and Bones
427 Sky Dogs
* 428 Skyrocket (Super Friends #4)
* 429 Slam Bradley <- needs more info on modern apps.
430 the Smashing Sportsman
431 Snafu
432 Snapper Carr's betrayal of the JLA
* 433 the Sniper (Quality hero) (Military #5-34)
* 434 Solarman (Superman v1 #298)
435 Sonik
* 436 Soyuz / the Red Stars (called Red Stars in Firestorm the NM #69, called Soyuz in #70-71, first in costume in #72-73, more?)
437 Space Marshal
438 the Space Rangers
439 Space Voyagers
440 Spanner's Galaxy
441 Split
* 442 the Sponge Man (Challengers Of The Unknown v1 #47,51)
* 443 the Squire I (Young All-Stars #22-23,25-27) (See also Item #94.)
444 Squire Shade
445 SR-12
* 446 Stalker (Stalker #1-4, Swamp Thing v2 #163-164, the All Star v2 #1-2 event)
447 Stanley and his Monster
* 448 Starfire / Red Star (See Item #101.)
449 Starfire (sword & sorcery)
450 Starhunters
451 the Starman Dynasty
452 the Starman of 1957
453 Starman (Mikaal Tomas)
454 Steel-Man
455 Sterling Silversmith
456 the Suicide Squadron
457 Sunburst I - VI
458 Super-Chief
459 Super-Duper
460 the Super Friends: Their Allies And Enemies
461 Super-Hip
462 the Superman Dynasty
463 Superman, Junior
464 Super-Turtle
465 Superwoman (Luma Lynai of Staryl)
466 Superwoman (Kristen Wells)
467 Swashbuckler
468 Swing with Scooter
469 the Swordfish and the Barracuda
470 Tailgunner Jo
471 the Tarantula (Jerry Lewis)
* 472 the Tasmanian Devil (See Item #101.)
473 Ted and Teri Trapper
* 474 the Templar Knight (See Item #101.)
475 Terra-Man
* 476 the Terrific Whatzit (McSnurtle the Turtle) (Funny Stuff #1, more)
477 Thanatos
478 The-Thing-That-Cannot-Die
* 479 the Third Archer (Andre Reynard) (Adventure #162)
480 the Three Aces
* 481 the Three Musketeers (DC Special #22-25, more?)
482 Thriller
483 T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents
* 484 Thunderlord (See Item #101.)
485 Tiger-Man (Desmond Farr)
486 the Timeless Ones
487 Tim Trench
488 the T.N.T. Trio
489 Tom Sparks, Boy Inventor
490 the Tornado Twins
491 Toyman (Bronze Age)
492 Tracey Thompson
* 493 Tuatara (See Item #101.)
* 494 Tundra (See Item #101.)
495 Two-Gun Lil
496 Ubu
497 Ultra the Multi-Alien
498 Ultraa (pre-Crisis)
* 499 Ultraa (post-Crisis) (JLQ #13, Justice League Europe #65, Justice League America #90, more?)
* 500 the Unimaginable (JLofA #42,44, Valor #5-10, Supermen Of America #1-6) <-- needs more info
501 Ur the Caveboy
502 USA. The Spirit of Old Glory
503 U.S.S. Stevens
504 Vartox (pre-Crisis)
505 Vartox (post-Crisis)
506 Venom
507 Vext
* 508 the Viking Commando (All-Out War #1-6, Unknown Soldier v1 #266-267)
509 Virago
510 Volar
511 Wandjina (See Item #33.)
* 512 Warhead (Super Friends #36)
* 513 the Waterfront Warrior (Huntress v1 #14-16)
* 514 Watt the Question Man (All-Flash #21,29, more?)
515 Wayne Clifford (Dateline: Frontline)
516 Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog
* 517 Whirlicane (Action #457, Superman v1 #303)
518 Whirlwind
519 Wild Dog
520 Wildfire (Quality heroine)
* 521 the Wild Huntsman (See Item #101.)
522 Willow
523 Wilson Forbes
* 524 Wingman (See Item #101.)
525 Wizard of the Cosmos I & II
* 526 Wonder Boy (Quality hero) (National #1-26)
527 the Wondertwins (pre-Crisis) and Gleek
* 528 the Wondertwins (post-Crisis) (Extreme Justice #9, more)
529 the World-Beater
* 530 the Writer (Suicide Squad #58)
* 531 the Wyoming Kid (Western Comics #1, more)
532 Xeen Arrow of Dimension Zero
533 Yango the Super-Ape
534 Yankee Doodle
535 the Yellow Peri
* 536 Yggardis, the Living Planet
537 Zero-Man



outpost2
Member
posted January 12, 2003 04:53 PM

datalore may cover:
80. Captains of Industry (expanded)

dnewton may cover:
99. Claw the Unconquered
161. the Force of July

Hellst0ne may cover:
442. the Sponge Man
476. the Terrific Whatzit

outpost2 is working on:
412. the Seven Soldiers of Victory / the Law's Legionnaires (golden age)

The Vigilante may cover:
264. King Faraday
375. Pulsar (Karate Kid foe) (expanded) ?
420. Silverblade
429. Slam Bradley (expanded)



outpost2
Member
posted January 12, 2003 04:54 PM

THE SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY
(a.k.a. The Law's Legionnaires)

Base of Operations: New York City
First Appearance: Leading Comics #1 (Winter 1941-42)

History: In the Spring of 1938, "Fly-Foot" Creamer, an acrobat and small-time crook, is convicted and sentenced to prison. He places his young daughter, Meredith (age ~5), in an orphanage, stipulating that his daughter never learn that her father was a criminal. [Refer to Star Spangled Comics #81 (June 1948).] [Note: Merry Creamer's age is estimated here.]

On October 31st of 1938, Lee Travis (age 25), wealthy young publisher of the Globe-Leader, a New York newspaper, dons a business suit, mask, crimson cape, and slouch hat, and attends a costumed charity ball in New Jersey as a highway robber. The proceeds will be used to aid the residents of Hankow, China, homeland of Lee's driver, Wing How (age ~16). During the ball, Orson Welles' War of the Worlds radio play puts the attendees in a panic, until they realize the broadcast is not real. Suddenly, criminals dressed as Martians crash the party and steal the proceeds. The disguised Lee Travis and Wing chase after the crooks, eventually capturing them. Lee continues to fight crime wearing the outfit he wore to the charity ball, calling himself the Crimson Avenger. The plain-clothes Wing is his only confidant, and aides him in many of his adventures. [1st app. of the Crimson Avenger and Wing in Detective Comics #20 (Oct 1938), origin first revealed in Secret Origins [1st ongoing series] #5 (Aug 1986).] [Note: Lee Travis was born in 1913, as shown in Infinity Inc. #11 (Feb 1985). Secret Origins #5 establishes that Lee was twenty-five when he became the Crimson Avenger. According to the 1976 DC Calendar, Lee's birthday is March 11th and Wing's birthday is August 18th. Wing's age is approximated here, based on his having a driver's license. Crimson Avenger #1 (June 1988) establishes that Wing's last name is How.]

In the Summer of 1940, the Crimson Avenger dons a new, skin-tight costume. [Refer to Detective Comics #44 (Oct 1940).]

In the Winter of 1940, Tom Hallaway becomes the archer named the Spider. It is a nickname given him as a child, one which stuck. He is in reality a criminal who uses the guise of a hero to further his own agenda, eliminating his competition and expanding his criminal empire in the city of St. Louis. [1st app. of the Spider in Crack Comics #1 (May 1940) by Quality Comics, 1st app. at DC in All-Star Squadron #50 (Oct 1985).] [Note: The Spider having a criminal background is a retcon. Refer to The Shade #3 (June 1997) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

In 532 A.D., a new knight of the Round Table, Sir Justin, searches for the ogre Blunderbore, to avenge the death of Sir Fallon. On the way, he accidentally frees the wizard Merlin from a spell which had imprisoned him. Merlin transforms Justin into the Shining Knight, and casts a spell which gives the knight's horse, Victory, functional wings. In his new armor, atop his magical steed dubbed "Winged Victory", Justin quickly finds the ogre and slays him. But the battle causes an avalanche of ice which buries both the knight and his steed. In the Summer of 1941, the Shining Knight awakens from suspended animation fourteen centuries later when Dr. Moresby, a museum director, frees him from an iceberg with dynamite. As a cover, Justin takes the name Justin Arthur and attains a job in Moresby's New York City museum. Occasionally, Merlin uses his magic to summon the Shining Knight back to Camelot. The Knight is sometimes aided by Sir Butch. [1st app. of the Shining Knight in Adventure Comics #66 (Sep 1941), origin retold in All-Star Squadron #62 (Oct 1987), the new Camelot adventures and the origin of Sir Butch featured in Adventure Comics #132 (Sep 1948).] [Note: All-Star Squadron #62 clearly places Sir Justin's resuscitation in the Summer of 1941.] [Additional Note: In Swamp Thing [2nd series] #87 (June 1989), Sir Justin, the last surviving Knight of the Round Table, returns to King Arthur with the Holy Grail. During that time he meets the time-lost Swamp Thing. In Superman [2nd series] #55 (May 1991), during the Fall of Camelot, Merlin attempts to summon Sir Justin from the 20th century, but is blocked by the magicks of Morgaine Le Fey.]

On July 4th 1941, Sylvester Pemberton, Jr. (age 14), son of a wealthy banker, and mechanic Pat Dugan (age ~20) are in attendance at the showing of a patriotic film, when suddenly Nazis agents start a riot in the theater. Shortly after, both Sylvester and Pat overhear a policeman say he wishes that the American flag could come to life to deal with the Nazi agents. Each is inspired to make that happen, and soon after the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy appear. At first operating independently, they finally combine forces to halt the Nazi plot against the United States. Pat later takes a job as the Pemberton chauffeur. [1st app. of the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy in a promo in Action Comics #40 (Sep 1941), 2nd app. in Star Spangled Comics #1 (Oct 1941), origin first revealed in Star Spangled Comics #18 (Mar 1943), origin retold in Secret Origins [2nd ongoing] #9 (Dec 1986).] [Note: Secret Origins [2nd ongoing] #9 establishes that Sylvester was thirteen or fourteen when he became the Star-Spangled Kid. According to The Amazing World Of DC Comics #16 (Dec 1977), Sylvester was born in 1926. According to the 1976 DC Calendar, Sylvester's birthday is December 13th and Pat's birthday is March 5th. In the post-Crisis reality, Sylvester's birthday is in October, as shown in Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000), making him fourteen on July 4th. Also, in Infinity Inc. #11 (Feb 1985), Sylvester states that Pat is only a few years older than him, while Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000) indicates that Pat was born in the 1920s, hence the estimate for Pat's age above.]

In the Summer of 1941, Greg Sanders, who was born in Wyoming but had since moved to New York City to become a radio singer, is informed that his father has been killed. Greg's father was a county sheriff, shot by criminals who were after a gold shipment that he was guarding. Greg travels back West and, becoming the masked Vigilante, tracks down his father's killers. After he returns to New York, he is aided in his fight against crime by his friend Billy Gunn. [1st app. of the Vigilante in Action Comics #42 (Nov 1941), 1st app. of Billy Gunn in Action Comics #43 (Dec 1941).] [Note: According to the 1976 DC Calendar, Greg's birthday is February 10th. Also, according to World's Finest Comics #246 (Aug-Sep 1977), which describes the Earth-One Vigilante's origin, the name of Sheriff Sanders' killers was the Judas Priest Gang.] [Additional note: In the pre-Crisis reality, Oliver Queen and his ward Roy Harper became the Earth-Two Green Arrow and Speedy around this same time. Refer to More Fun Comics #73 (Nov 1941).]

In the late Summer of 1941, Lee Travis' chauffeur, Wing, becomes the Crimson Avenger's costumed partner. [Refer to Detective Comics #59 (Jan 1942).] [Note: Wing's age is approximated here.]

In the late Summer of 1941, the criminal mastermind known as the Hand learns that he is gravely ill and has less than a month to live. He pledges to make the world remember him long after he is gone by giving his greatest unused plans to other criminals to execute for him. He gathers five villains together, "the Hand's Five Fingers", then challenges certain heroes to stop them. Prof. Merlin battles the Spider, the Needle battles the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy, Red Dragon battles the Shining Knight, Big Caesar battles the Crimson Avenger and Wing, and the Dummy battles the Vigilante and Billy Gunn. When the criminals are all defeated, the Hand decides to kill the heroes himself, and invites them to his home, which is filled with traps. The Hand then learns that a means of curing him has been found. He is more determined than ever to defeat the heroes so he can stay out of prison. At the conclusion of their confrontation, the villain aims his lightning-ray machine at the heroes, but the Vigilante shoots the machine down, apparently killing the Hand. The heroes decide that they work well together and resolve to officially form a team. The Crimson Avenger wants to limit Wing's exposure to danger because he has a very promising future, so he refuses to allow Wing to join. The heroes form the Seven Soldiers of Victory (a.k.a. the Law's Legionnaires), with Wing as an unofficial eighth Soldier. [1st app. of the Seven Soldiers of Victory in Leading Comics #1 (Winter 1941-42), retold in Justice League Of America #100 (Aug 1972).] [Note: It is assumed that the Spider replaced Green Arrow and Speedy in the post-Crisis reality starting with the Soldiers' first adventure. Billy Gunn is also assumed to be a Solider here based on a cameo in Infinity Inc. #51 (June 1988) and the letters page of Young All-Stars #15 (Aug 1988).]

In the Fall of 1941, the Soldiers battle the Black Star and his partners in crime: Captain Bigg, the Rattler, Falseface, the Hopper, and the Brain. The Black Star instructs his cohorts to collect five seemingly worthless items which, when used together, form a "black light" which makes organic matter grow to amazing size. The Black Star uses the black light on himself to make himself huge. During their final battle, the Black Star is knocked into the black light beam. He grows to such an immense size that the floor and ground under him collapse, and the Black Star disappears into the Earth. [Refer to Leading Comics #2 (Spring 1942).]

In the Fall of 1941, the Head, a secret agent for Imperial Japan, seeks to provoke a Tong War in New York City's Chinatown. He frames Lin Chou, the wise leader of the White Lotus Tong, for wrongdoing. Lin Chou has two grandsons, Daniel (age 14) and Victor (age 10) Leong. Danny, nicknamed "Stuff", helps the Vigilante battle the Hand and his men, and clears Lin Chou's name. Thereafter, Danny becomes the Vigilante's sidekick, known as Stuff the Chinatown Kid. [1st app. of Stuff in Action Comics #45 (Feb 1942).] [Note: Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #1 (Nov 1995) - #4 (Feb 1996) establishes that Stuff is half-Chinese, that his first name is Danny, and that his age would be seventeen in November 1944. El Diablo #12 (Aug 1990) and a Who's Who loose-leaf entry establish that Victor was ten years old when he met the Vigilante. Danny's last name is assumed to be the same as his brother's, which was revealed to be Leong in El Diablo #12. It is unclear if Victor and Daniel have the same mother. If not, Victor may be full-blooded Chinese.]

In the Fall of 1941, caught in one of the Luftwaffe's bombing raids on London, Percy Sheldrake (age nearly 20 years) and his mother are rescued by the Shining Knight. Whenever the Shining Knight is in England, Percy becomes his secret sidekick, the Squire. [1st app. of the Squire in Young All-Stars #22 (Jan 1989).] [Note: According to Young All-Stars #23 (Mar 1989), by June of 1942, Percy Sheldrake had a wife and one year old son, Cyril. Batman #62 (Dec 1950-Jan 1951), Infinity Inc. #34 (Jan 1987), and New Teen Titans [2nd series] #44 (June 1988) show that Percy will become the Earl of Wordenshire and take up the costumed identity of the Knight by the Fall of 1950, while his son Cyril will become the new Squire.]

In the Winter of 1942, a homeless boy, nicknamed "Breezy", saves Sylvester, Jr. from a kidnapping attempt. Syl's grateful father offers the boy a place in their home. The Star Spangled Kid and Stripesy learn that Breezy is being stalked by Doctor Weerd. They ultimately discover that Breezy's mother had inherited a fortune before she died and Weerd wanted Breezy to sign over all rights to the money. Afterward, Sylvester John Pemberton, Sr. and his wife, Gloria, adopt young Breezy. [Refer to Star Spangled Comics #6 (Mar 1942) and World's Finest Comics #6 (Summer 1942).]

In January of 1942, the Soldiers battle a scientist named Dr. Wilfred Doome. Using his newly perfected time ray, Doome calls forth Nero, Attila the Hun, Napolean Bonaparte, Genghis Khan, and Alexander the Great. After defeating the villains, who are returned to their own eras, the Soldiers follow Doome to the Siege of Troy in the 12th century B.C.. Dr. Doome befriends Odysseus and Agamemnon, but they are soon convinced that it is Doome who is the enemy. Doome escapes to 1942, and the Soldiers follow him. Doome then uses his time machine to escape into the far future, after which it explodes. [Refer to Leading Comics #3 (Summer 1942), retold in flashback in All-Star Squadron #29 (Jan 1984).] [Note: Since All-Star Squadron #29 takes place in February 1942, and the Shining Knight has been in London for "the past few weeks", and the battle with Dr. Doome is told in flashback, then Leading Comics #3 most likely occurred in January.]

In early April of 1942, the Soldiers battle the Sense-Master, in reality a man named Dr. Brett, who tries to gather together five jewels which, when put together, will yield the Lifestone. Brett alters five unwilling criminals who gather the gems: Mickey Gordon, "Fingers" O'Fallon, "Human Bloodhound", Leo Palate, and "Eagle-Eye" Nelson. The Lifestone would have been used to bring an army of stone to life, which Brett could have used to conquer the world, but when the Lifestone is removed from Brett, he turns to stone himself. [Refer to Leading Comics #4 (Autumn 1942), retold in All-Star Squadron #56 (Apr 1986).] [Note: Since All-Star Squadron #56 takes place in early April of 1942, Leading Comics #5 also occurred at that time.]

In late June of 1942, an elderly man, whose wealth has failed to stave off the ravages of old age, snaps. Calling himself the Skull, he pays criminals to steal an unproven experimental device which has reversed aging in a few laboratory animals. Their actions attract the attention of the Seven Soldiers of Victory. The Vigilante's new partner, Stuff, replaces Billy Gunn on the team. Also, because the Spider is occupied with other matters and cannot attend, the Shining Knight's sidekick, the Squire, whose existence only recently became public, accompanies the team as an unofficial eighth Soldier of Victory. During their final onslaught on the Skull's remote mansion, the heroes find the villain dead. Two of the wires in the de-aging device were accidentally crossed, causing the Skull to age to death instead of returning him to his youth. After the adventure concludes, the Shining Knight brings the Squire back to England. [Refer to Leading Comics #5 (Winter 1942-43), retold in Young All-Stars #27 (July 1989).] [Note: Since Young All-Stars #27 takes place in late June of 1942, Leading Comics #5 also occurred at that time.]

Some months after returning to Europe, Percy Sheldrake is captured by the Nazis. He remains a P.O.W. for the rest of the war. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #34 (Jan 1987).]

In the Fall of 1942, the Soldiers battle Scrivener. [Refer to Leading Comics #6 (Spring 1943).]

In the Winter of 1943, the Soldiers battle the Wizards of Stanovia. [Refer to Leading Comics #7 (Summer 1943).]

In the Spring of 1943, the Soldiers battle the Dummy. The Dummy captures the heroes and, with a stolen time machine, sends them into the past. The Spider meets the Three Musketeers in 17th century France, the Crimson Avenger and Wing arrive in China circa 225 BC and help defend against a Japanese invasion, the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy are present when Eric the Red and his son Leif discover North America circa 1000 A.D., the Vigilante meets Julius Caesar in the 1st century B.C., and the Shining Knight meets Leonardo da Vinci in 15th century Italy. Da Vinci, who is descended from the Homo Magi, uses his arcane knowledge to build a time machine that Sir Justin uses to rescue his teammates. The heroes return to their own time period and defeat the Dummy. [Refer to Leading Comics #8 (Autumn 1943).] [Note: Vandal Savage has claimed to have been Julius Caesar, however it is unclear if Savage was the real Julius or merely impersonated him at one point. Leonardo da Vinci's Homo Magi lineage was revealed as part of the origin of Zatara the Magician, his descendant.]

In the Summer of 1943, the Soldiers battle Mr. X. [Refer to Leading Comics #9 (Winter 1943-44).]

In the Fall of 1943, the Soldiers battle Baby-Face Johnson. [Refer to Leading Comics #10 (Spring 1944).]

In the Winter of 1944, the Soldiers battle Handsome Harry. [Refer to Leading Comics #11 (Summer 1944).]

In the Spring of 1944, the Soldiers battle henchmen hired by Weldon Darrell's secretary. [Refer to Leading Comics #12 (Autumn 1944).]

In the Summer of 1944, the Soldiers battle Barracuda. [Refer to Leading Comics #13 (Winter 1944-45).]

In the Fall of 1944, the Soldiers battle villains from various fictional books. [Refer to Leading Comics #14 (Spring 1945).]

In November 1944, in the city of Los Angeles, seventeen year old Stuff tells Greg Sanders that he is in love with a girl named Stacey, an actress. Two weeks later, Stuff asks Stacey to marry him and she says yes. When Stacey then goes missing for two days, Stuff frantically goes to Greg for help. Evidence suggests that the gangster Bugsy Siegel is involved. The Vigilante traces Stacey's tracks to Tijuana, Mexico, where he learns Stacey was enslaved, had escaped, and was shot and killed. From San Diego, the Vigilante calls for Stuff on the phone, but learns that, while he was gone, Stuff had confronted Siegel about Stacey, was tied up, and beaten to death by the mobster. [Refer to Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #1 (Nov 1995).]

In the Winter of 1945, the Seven Soldiers of Victory are mysteriously called to a meeting. A strange elf-like boy appears, introducing himself as Willie Wisher. He claims that he has the power to make anything happen just by wishing for it. The heroes scoff, so Willie Wisher wishes for the Soldiers to be banished to the Land of Magic. The Soldiers eventually demonstrate how, even without meaning to, Willie could be causing harm to innocents by casually wishing for things. They make him feel so bad that Willie wishes he had never been born. Willie suddenly ceases to exist. [Refer to Adventure Comics #438 (Mar-Apr 1975) - #443 (Jan-Feb 1976).] [Note: Time period assumed based on the quarterly publication of Leading Comics.]

For months, the Vigilante has been causing Bugsy Siegel all kinds of trouble. The Dummy, an old enemy of the Vigilante, offers his services to Siegel. In the Summer of 1945, the Vigilante is tricked onto a booby-trapped boat, where he learns that the Dummy is allied with Siegel. The Vigilante is believed killed in the explosion. [Refer to Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #2 (Dec 1995).]

By June 12th 1946, the Vigilante has been out of action almost a year, in hiding, healing from his wounds. [Refer to Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #3 (Jan 1996).]

On December 26th 1946, Bugsy Siegel, who had used mob money to build the first casino in Vegas, opens the Flamingo. When no one comes to the grand opening, the mob decides Siegel must die. The Vigilante resurfaces in Vegas just before dawn. [Refer to Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #3 (Jan 1996).]

The mob hires the Dummy to kill Bugsy Siegel. When Siegel arrives in Hollywood, he and his men are attacked by the Dummy and his crew. The Vigilante shows up, distracts the Dummy, and tells Siegel to run. The Vigilante chases the Dummy up into the rafters of a building. The Dummy falls and is believed dead. Later, the Vigilante is contacted and told Siegel wants to see him. On June 20th 1947, the Vigilante meets with Siegel and learns that he doesn't even remember killing Stuff. Siegel tells the Vigilante that he is a failure and a marked man, and he wants the hero to kill him. The Vigilante refuses. Furious, Siegel taunts the Vigilante about how he does indeed remember killing Stuff and how thoroughly he enjoyed it. The Vigilante shoots Siegel dead. [Refer to Vigilante: City Lights, Prairie Justice #4 (Feb 1996).]

In Summer of 1947, the Vigilante discovers that the Dummy survived their last encounter. The Dummy taunts the Vigilante by informing him that it was he, and not Bugsy Siegel, that killed Stuff in 1944. The Dummy had wanted to make the Vigilante suffer by killing Stuff, but he didn't want the hero to hound him, so he made it appear as if it was Siegel that beat Stuff to death. The Dummy enjoyed watching the Vigilante grieve over the next few months, then hired out his services to Siegel, so that he could take pleasure in finally killing his old foe. The Dummy was foiled that time but, as he now evades capture, he swears he won't rest until the Vigilante is dead. Recalling that Siegel had told him he didn't remember killing Stuff, the Vigilante now has to live with the fact that he killed the wrong man in cold-blood. [Note: It is strongly inferred in Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000) that the Dummy killed Stuff, hence the changes suggested above. It is interesting to note that the Earth-One Stuff was killed by the Dummy in World's Finest Comics #246 (Aug-Sep 1977).]

The Vigilante contacts Victor Leong (age ~15) to inform him that his brother's killer still lives. Victor becomes the new Stuff. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #1 (Aug 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: Stuff II's full name is first revealed in El Diablo #12 (Aug 1990).]

In the Spring of 1948, a bullet creases the Star-Spangled Kid's head during a battle with a criminal gang. While the injury is not serious, he is forced to wear a bandage in his secret identity of Sylvester Pemberton, Jr.. When he is unable to explain to his parents what happened to him, they insist he see a psychiatrist. Noting that Sylvester has no close friends, his adopted brother Breezy being something of a black-sheep, the psychiatrist suggests a companion. Mr. and Mrs. Pemberton adopt Merry Creamer (age ~15) from the local orphanage. Learning of the adoption, two hoods named Klinker and Buggsy track down her father, "Fly-Foot" Creamer, who was recently freed from prison and has since gone straight, obtaining a job as a circus performer. Threatening to reveal him to the Pembertons and Merry, the crooks force Creamer to help them pull a job as the villain called the Human Fly. He double-crosses the thugs and they shoot him, just as the Star-Spangled Kid shows up. With his dying breath, Creamer explains to the Kid that he was blackmailed, that his daughter is now with a nice family, and that he wishes she never learn that her father was an ex-con. The Kid vows to keep his secret. The murderers are ultimately killed by the police in a shoot-out. Merry learns that the Star-Spangled Kid used a handkerchief that she had given Sylvester, and deduces that the hero must be her adoptive brother. [1st app. of Merry in Star Spangled Comics #81 (June 1948).]

In the Spring of 1948, Merry Pemberton dons a costume and secretly aids her brother, the Star-Spangled Kid, in the capture of Presto the Magician. The villain's gimmicks inspire her, and she names herself the Gimmick Girl. [1st app. of Merry as the Gimmick Girl in Star Spangled Comics #82 (July 1948).]

In the Spring of 1948, Stripesy breaks his leg battling a criminal called the Rope. When the Star-Spangled Kid is knocked out by the villain, the Gimmick Girl uses her new gadgets to capture him. She temporarily becomes the Star-Spangled Kid's new partner, until Stripesy's leg heals. [Refer to Star Spangled Comics #83 (Aug 1948).]

In late October 1948, in the city of St. Louis, just after Sylvester Pemberton's 22nd birthday, the Seven Soldiers of Victory gather for what will be their final adventure. They have been contacted by the Spider about a coming menace. Stripesy takes one look at the plans that the Spider had sent over and whips up the nebula rod. The device is a lightning rod of sorts, gathering nebuloid-energy from space, which can then be channeled against any opposing nebula threat. They wonder how the Spider got the plans in the first place and mention that they think he is shifty. The Spider arrives, visibly weak. He tells his teammates that their old enemy, the Hand, is in the process of creating a living entity of cosmic energy, with the power of twenty atomic bombs. He plans to unleash it's power in St. Louis. The Spider explains that he contacted the Soldiers, over the All-Star Squadron or the Justice Society, because he had to get help from a group he could count on. After looking over the nebula rod, the Spider collapses, dropping a map of the Hand's hideout. The Crimson Avenger tells Wing, who is not an official team member, to stay behind and get medical help for the Spider, while the Soldiers check out the hideout. Shortly after they leave, Billy Gunn arrives. He had been doing intensive background checks on the Spider after hearing the Vigilante's growing suspicions. He tells Wing the whole thing is a set up. Billy Gunn is suddenly shot through the neck with an arrow. The killer, the Spider, holds a key piece to the nebula rod in his hand. Wing attacks and knocks the Spider out, taking the critical component from him. The Soldiers find the Nebula Man and engage him in battle. The Crimson Avenger grabs the nebula rod and runs towards the creature. Wing then arrives, telling his friends that Billy Gunn is dead, and that they have been betrayed by the Spider. The Crimson Avenger stabs the Nebula Man with the rod. The resulting explosion teleports them all to the other side of the world, to the Himalayas. Wing grabs the nebula rod, inserts the missing piece, and attacks the Nebula Man once again. The resulting blast destroys the enemy, but kills Wing, and sends the rest of the team into the timestream. Monks at a nearby monastery, who witnessed the battle, bury the young hero, unaware that the energy of the Nebula Man was absorbed into Wing's broken form. They mark the grave with a tombstone with the epitaph "Here In Honored Glory Lies An Unknown Soldier Of Victory Who Died That His World Might Live". [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #7 (Feb 2000), #8 (Mar 2000), and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: According to the 1976 DC Calendar, Wing died on June 28th. In the post-Crisis reality, he died in late October, as shown in Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000). Although Pat Dugan states in Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 that Sylvester had just turned 19 years old when they battled the Nebula Man, this is clearly a mistake on Pat's part, as that would have made Sylvester only eleven when he first became the Star-Spangled Kid.]



outpost2
Member
posted January 12, 2003 04:55 PM

THE SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY (continued)

In 1950, the golden age Flash retires. The Spider, who is descended from the Ludlow family, a family dedicated to the destruction of the immortal Shade, decides to move his criminal operation out of St. Louis because too many people are beginning to suspect the truth about his covert activities. He relocates to Keystone City, in order to destroy his family's enemy. He has a news conference to proclaim that Keystone City has a new protector, and after a month is endorsed by the Flash. Over the following months, the Spider plays the hero, battling criminals, including the Shade. The Shade is unaware that, after every battle with his new foe, the Spider's men collect the residue of his shadow force. Over the following months, the Shade secretly does research in St. Louis on the Spider's past. [Refer to The Shade #3 (June 1997).]

In 1951, the Shade learns that the Spider is really a criminal and confronts him. The Spider reveals he is a Ludlow, and that he came to Keystone City to destroy the Shade. The Spider captures the Shade, then reveals that he has sent his men to the Garrick residence to kill the Flash and his wife. His men will plant the Shade's shadow residue, collected by his men over the past months, on the Garricks' bodies. Super-heroes will hound the Shade for the rest of his existence. The Shade easily kills the Spider and escapes. He reaches the Garrick residence just in time to stop the murders. The Shade tells the Flash that he left evidence about the Spider's criminal activities for the police to find, and asks the Flash not to notify them of his involvement. [Refer to The Shade #3 (June 1997) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

In the late 1950s, Sylvester John Pemberton, Sr. dies. By this time, Gloria Pemberton, his wife, and Breezy Pemberton, his adopted son, have also died. Merry, his adopted daughter, renounces any claim to the estate. Arthur Pemberton, Breezy's infant son, is declared the sole heir to the Pemberton fortune. [Refer to All-Star Comics # 71 (Mar-Apr 1978) and Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984).] [Note: For simplicity, it is assumed that it was Sylvester's younger adopted brother "Breezy", and not some older deceased brother as mentioned in Infinity Inc. #3, who was the father of Arthur Pemberton. Also, in Infinity Inc. #3, Sylvester states that Merry renounced the Pemberton fortune a few years after he disappeared. Setting the above events in the late 1950s allows Breezy Pemberton enough time to sire a son before dying, while still placing the events within a few years of Sylvester's disappearance.]

In the 1960s, Merry Pemberton marries Henry King, the villain called Brain Wave. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984) and Infinity Inc. #9 (Dec 1984).] [Note: The actual events describing the courtship and marriage of Merry and Brain Wave have not yet been chronicled.]

~29 years ago, Merry King gives birth to Henry, Jr.. Later, her husband, Brain Wave, is arrested and is sentenced to many years in jail, leaving Merry to raise her son alone. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984) and #9 (Dec 1984), and Who's Who #15 (May 1986).] [Note: When Hank, Jr. first became Brainwave, Jr., he had been out of college only a few months. Assuming he followed a four-year undergraduate program, Hank would have graduated at about age twenty-one or twenty-two, placing his birth approximately twenty-nine years ago.]

~16 years ago, after years of despair over her husband's criminal activities, Merry Pemberton has a severe nervous breakdown. Henry, Jr., now in his early teens, believes his mother has died. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984), #9 (Dec 1984), and #23 (Feb 1986), Who's Who #15 (May 1986), and Young Justice #16 (Jan 2000).] [Note: There is a contradiction between Brainwave, Jr.'s statement that he watched his mother die, and her subsequent reappearance in Old Justice. The actual events surrounding her breakdown and faked death have not yet been chronicled.]

12 years ago, the Seven Soldiers of Victory mysteriously appear and are captured by the invading Appellaxians, along with many of Earth's other heroes. Back in the Spring of 1943, the Dummy had sent the team into different eras in the past. Using a time machine built by Leonardo da Vinci, the heroes attempted to return to their proper time period, but accidentally overshot their mark by more than four decades. With the crisis at hand, no one notices the presence of the Soldiers. After fighting alongside other heroes to free Earth from the threat of the alien invaders, the Soldiers, worried that someone might stumble across their time machine, quickly slip away to locate the temporal device. The Soldiers find the time machine intact, return back to 1943, and defeat the Dummy. [Refer to JLA: Year One #11 (Nov 1998) and #12 (Dec 1998), and Leading Comics #8 (Autumn 1943).] [Note: The events of JLA: Year One #11-12 have been inserted into the conclusion of Leading Comics #8, so as to explain the appearance of the Soldiers during the Appellaxian invasion. The events described above are just one theory, the true facts have not yet been revealed.]

10 years ago, Dr. Fate and the rest of the Justice Society summon the Justice League. A cosmic hand has appeared around the Earth, created by a madman who calls himself the Iron Hand. If the Earth does not hand over control of the planet to him within 48 hours, the Iron Hand will command the cosmic hand to crush the Earth. Fate's mystic crystal reveals an image of a tombstone in the Himalayas, referring to "An Unknown Soldier Of Victory". Dr. Fate, Zatanna, and Johnny Thunder's Thunderbolt summon Oracle, a mystical being of great power. Oracle tells them of the Nebula Man, a creature that threatened the world in 1948. The Seven Soldiers of Victory had been beaten back by the entity, but they arose anew with a new weapon. One of their number sacrificed his life to use it to it's full effect. Oracle explains that the heroes were lost in time in the resulting explosion. Everyone present who even remembered the Soldiers assumed that they had simply retired in '48. Oracle agrees to direct the heroes down six time-corridors. [Refer to Justice League Of America #100 (Aug 1972), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: In the pre-Crisis reality: The Justice League of America roster was Aquaman, the silver age Atom, Batman, the silver age Black Canary, the Elongated Man, the silver age Flash, Green Arrow, the silver age Green Lantern, the silver age Hawkman, and Superman, plus the powerless silver age Diana Prince, Metamorpho, and Zatanna. The Justice Society of America roster was Doctor Fate, Doctor Mid-Nite, the golden age Green Lantern, Hourman, Johnny Thunder, Mr. Terrific, the silver age Red Tornado, the golden age Robin, the Sandman, Starman, Wildcat, and the golden age Wonder Woman. In the post-Crisis reality: The silver age Green Lantern was apparently not present, his actions performed by the golden age Green Lantern. The silver age Hawkman was replaced by the golden age Hawkman. The silver age Diana Prince and the golden age Robin no longer exist. Doctor Fate took over some or all of the functions of Oracle. The golden age Wonder Woman was replaced by the Queen Hippolyte version. The "Hippolyte" Wonder Woman was only active from 1942 to 1950, and then again a decade from now, so her appearance here is likely related to the paradoxical temporal nature of her home, Themyscira. Also, post-Crisis, only six Soldiers, not seven, were teleported through time.]

The Crimson Avenger arrives in Mexico at the height of the Aztec reign, approximately five centuries in the past. A glowing rock, a piece of the Nebula Man, steals his memory and imbues him with energy powers. He comes to believe he is the Sun God, Huitzilopochtli, and becomes King of the Aztecs. The silver age Atom, Elongated Man, and Dr. Fate arrive and try to save the Crimson Avenger, but he blasts them with his new power. After a short fight, the Atom knocks the Crimson Avenger unconscious. The heroes find a strange glowing rock and destroy it. The Crimson Avenger regains his memory and loses the energy powers. The heroes are then magically retrieved. [Refer to Justice League Of America #100 (Aug 1972) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: The era was deduced from the horrific period during which the Aztecs sacrificed 20,000 people to Huitzilopochtli.]

[Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the golden age Green Lantern, the golden age Robin, and Mr. Terrific arrive and meet the silver age Diana. Diana tells them what has occurred and explains that the Unknown Soldier's grave is hidden deep in the Himalayas. Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972).]

The Shining Knight arrives in China, in the 13th century A.D., at the camp of Genghis Khan. Khan's shaman uses his fiery gaze to mesmerize the Knight, making him a willing servant of the warlord. Superman, Metamorpho, and the Sandman arrive, where they meet monks who explain that the invader Temujn, known as Genghis Khan ("The Universal Ruler"), and his legions are being led by an armored god on a winged horse. Metamorpho searches for and locates the Shining Knight. He is surprised when the Knight attacks him. Metamorpho realizes he is somehow under Khan's control, and escapes to tell the others what has transpired. The next day, Khan's hordes attack. On instructions of the Sandman, Metamorpho creates a sleeping gas, incapacitating the invaders. Sandman devises an antidote and gives it to the Knight and his horse. The heroes are then magically retrieved. [Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: Vandal Savage has claimed to have been Genghis Khan, however it is unclear if Savage was the real Khan or merely impersonated him at one point.]

[Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the golden age Green Lantern, the golden age Robin, and Mr. Terrific decide to head to the Himalayas and discover who erected the grave site. Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972).]

[Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the golden age Green Arrow ends up in 12th century England, where he finds an injured Robin Hood under attack by the Sheriff of Nottingham and his men. Green Arrow successfully chases them off. While Robin heals from his wounds in the lodgings of a friendly friar, he asks Green Arrow to take his place. While on his way to tell Robin's Merry Men of Robin's plight, Green Arrow is captured by the Sheriff. The silver age Hawkman, the golden age Wonder Woman, and Dr. Mid-Nite arrive and are attacked by archers. The heroes defeat their attackers, and learn that they are the Merry Men, who believe they have just lost to the Sheriff's men. Little John says he doesn't know of anyone named Green Arrow, but could use their help rescuing their friend Robin Hood, who is to be hanged in the morning. The heroes make a dawn siege on Nottingham Castle. Dr. Mid-Nite locates the cell, but instead of Robin Hood it is Green Arrow that he finds. They escape and Green Arrow explains to the Merry Men that Robin is safe. The heroes are then magically retrieved. Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972).]

Stripesy ends up in ancient Egypt and is enslaved. He works on building the pyramids for a week, until Batman, Starman, and Hourman arrive. The trio are captured, but are freed with the help of Prince Khufu. They rescue Stripesy and escape through Dr. Fate's temporal portal. [Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the heroes see Stripesy working in the shadow of Khufu's future tomb. This is the Pharaoh Khufu, a.k.a. Cheops, who lived in the 26th century B.C.. The heroes are captured and imprisoned in the Pharaoh's burial chamber. Batman breaks Hourman's hourglass and they cut their bonds with the broken glass. Starman summons his cosmic rod to lead them out. A number of retcons are made in the post-Crisis version. For instance, Hourman's hourglass is no longer broken as a means of escape. This is because, in the revised reality, the hourglass was a gift from the future Hourman, filled with tachyon particles, which would have significance at a future date. Young Khufu is added as their new means of escape. If this is intended to be the same Prince Khufu that is later reincarnated as the golden age Hawkman, this would place the post-Crisis era for this adventure in the 16th century B.C..]

[Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the Iron Hand captures Diana. Refer to Justice League Of America #101 (Sep 1972).]

The Vigilante winds up in the Old West, circa 1870. Thanks to Johnny Thunder's bumbling, the Vigilante spends about twenty years in the past, but he doesn't really mind. The hero had many adventures alongside such legends as Nighthawk, Madame .44, and Strong Bow. In the late 1880's, he is captured by Indians, who prepare to burn him at the stake. Green Arrow, the silver age Black Canary, and Johnny Thunder locate the Indian village and see the Vigilante's plight. The Vigilante is rescued, and the heroes are magically retrieved. [Refer to Justice League Of America #102 (Oct 1972), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the era is inferred to be around the 10th century, based on the Thunderbolt's comments that he had to search approximately 1,000 years for Johnny Thunder. The Vigilante is captured by Indians who have heard prophecies that the white man will some day take their land. They prepare to burn him at the stake. Green Arrow, the silver age Black Canary, and Johnny Thunder locate the Indian village and see Vigilante's plight. Johnny Thunder speaks his magic word, but the Thunderbolt fails to appear. The heroes are captured, but a few hours later they somehow manage to escape. The Thunderbolt arrives and the heroes escape. In the post- Crisis reality, the Vigilante's time of arrival is deduced based on the fact that the Vigilante spent nearly two decades in the past. His capture by Indians is assumed, but not necessary, due to the new Johnny Thunder "blunder" retcon. The Vigilante's two decade stint in the Old West hearken back to adventures he had in Action Comics #122 (July 1948) & #130 (Mar 1949), and Western Comics #3 (May-June 1948) & #4 (July-Aug 1948).]

The Star-Spangled Kid spends a week in a cave in 14,000 B.C., trying to avoid giving the prehistoric people there the flu. He uses quartz and scrap material to construct something that projects a distorted image of himself to the natives. Aquaman, Wildcat, and the golden age Green Lantern arrive and see the frightened people cornering something in the cave. They see the projected image and realize it is the Star-Spangled Kid. The natives attack the heroes, but when Wildcat knocks out the largest of them, the rest retreat. The trio enter the cave and split up into the side-tunnels. Aquaman finds the Kid, but they are swept away by a flash flood. They escape harm, and all are magically retrieved. [Refer to Justice League Of America #102 (Oct 1972), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: In Justice League Of America #102 and Who's Who #21 (Nov 1986), the estimate for the time period described above was 50,000 years ago. Post-Crisis, this was retconned to be 14,000 B.C.. In the post-Crisis retelling, the silver age Green Lantern was retconned to be the golden age Green Lantern.]

Stuff the Chinatown Kid ends up in ancient Greece, approximately 3,000 years in the past. The silver age Flash, Zatanna, and the Red Tornado arrive to rescue him. They find Stuff under the influence of the sorceress Circe. After freeing him from her enchantments, they are magically retrieved. [Refer to Justice League Of America #102 (Oct 1972), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the golden age Speedy lands on the Isle of Aenea. The sorceress Circe uses her magic wand to cast a spell on him, transforming him into a centaur, like she had done to many others before him. He is forced by her magic to obey her will. The silver age Flash, Zatanna, and the Red Tornado arrive on the small Mediterranean island. They spot Speedy and are shocked to see that he is now a centaur. They are even more surprised when he begins shooting arrows at them. Circe and a band of animal-men appear. Circe uses her wand to enchant Speedy's arrows. When he shoots them at the trio, they are all transformed into animal-men. Circe magically forces the heroes to fight one another, then leaves on Speedy's back. Zatanna reverses the spell, they stop Circe, cure the captured men, and destroy the wand. They are then magically retrieved. The post-Crisis events, which replaces Speedy with Stuff II, are unrevealed and can only be assumed to have occurred along similar lines. The time-period mentioned above is a rough estimate only.]

The heroes all gather back at Justice Society headquarters, albeit more than 40 years after the Soldiers disappeared. Since all the missing Soldiers are accounted for, Johnny Thunder wonders who was buried at the grave site. The Crimson Avenger proudly explains that it was his partner Wing, who bravely and selflessly sacrificed himself to save the world. Mr. Terrific, who traveled to the Himalayas during the rescue missions, tells the Crimson Avenger that holy men from a nearby temple witnessed the battle and laid Wing to rest where he fell. The heroes then explain to the Soldiers that they must rebuild the nebula rod to stop the new nebula menace. The Iron Hand appears and grabs Wonder Woman, pointing his mechanical hand menacingly at her head. The mystery villain is none other than the Hand, the Soldiers' first opponent, who somehow survived death. The villain lost his right hand in that battle, which he later replaced with an artificial one. Using her lightning-fast reflexes, Wonder Woman grabs hold of his iron hand and destroys it. The defeated villain tells the heroes that the controls were in his artificial hand, and that the nebulous hand of the Nebula Man can't be deactivated. The heroes hurry to do the impossible -- build a new nebula rod before time runs out. The rod is rebuilt without any time to spare, but it must be delivered into the heart of the menace, something no human can survive. While the others try to decide who will attempt the suicide mission, the Red Tornado quietly takes the device and slips away. The heroic android stops the menace of the Nebula Man a second time, but not without apparently sacrificing his life. Soon after, the Red Tornado turns up alive and joins the Justice League. [Refer to Justice League Of America #102 (Oct 1972).] [Note: In the pre-Crisis reality, the golden age Green Lantern, the golden age Robin, and Mr. Terrific arrive with the answer to who was buried at the grave site, but the Crimson Avenger proudly offers an explanation. Also, Iron Hand threatens to hurt the powerless Diana, who uses her martial arts skills to get the drop on him. For simplicity, this has been changed to the villain threatening Hippolyte instead, although this retcon has not yet been depicted or suggested.]

Before departing, the Soldiers learn that the Spider was killed by the Shade in 1951. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

When Starman breaks his leg in battle against the British Bat, he offers his cosmic rod and his spot in the Justice Society to the Star-Spangled Kid. [Refer to All-Star Comics #58 (Jan-Feb 1976), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #9 (Apr 2000).]

Pat Dugan goes to Las Vegas, meets Maggie Shaw, and two days later the two marry. Ten months after that, Michael Justin Dugan is born. Eventually, Maggie leaves Pat. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #11 (Feb 1985) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

Greg Sanders and Victor Leong start a chain of hamburger joints called Greg Sanders' Round-Up, establishing the first in Houston, Texas. Victor is made President of Round-Up, Inc.. Greg starts a new hobby, the study of costumed lawmen. [Refer to El Diablo #12 (Aug 1990) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

Since his newspaper had prospered in his absence, Lee Travis retires from crimefighting and decides to travel the world. [Refer to DC Comics Presents #38 (Oct 1981).]

The Soldiers lose contact with the Shining Knight. They believe he may have returned back to his own time-period. [Refer to All-Star Comics #64 (Jan-Feb 1977) - #65 (Mar-Apr 1977), Swamp Thing [2nd series] #87 (June 1989) and #109 (July 1991), Showcase '93 #9 (Sep 1993), and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: Since the Soldiers disappeared in October 1948, it is possible that the Knight's new adventures in Camelot, which didn't begin until Adventure Comics #132 (Sep 1948), took place during this "missing" block of time.]

Shortly after joining the Justice Society, the Star-Spangled Kid converts the cosmic rod into a belt. [Refer to All-Star Comics #64 (Jan-Feb 1977) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999).]

Some months after the Star-Spangled Kid's return from the past, he and the rest of the Justice Society battle the Strike Force in Gotham City. The Kid is captured and held for ransom. The leader of the Strike Force, unaware that the Star-Spangled Kid is actually Sylvester Pemberton, gloats that he plans to use the finances of Pemberton Industries that he inherited from his long-vanished uncle, Sylvester, to become the richest man in the world through criminal means. The Kid hence learns that the Strike Force leader is none other than Arthur Pemberton, his deceased brother's son. After he is rescued by the Justice Society, the Star-Spangled Kid deals with Arthur personally, then uses the courts to legally wrest control of Pemberton Industries and the Pemberton fortune from his corrupt nephew. [Refer to All-Star Comics #70 (Jan-Feb 1978) - #71 (Mar-Apr 1978) and Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984).]

9 years ago, while in Malaysia, Lee Travis learns he is dying from an unknown disease. Travis returns to the U.S. and is admitted to a Detroit hospital. From his hospital window, Travis sees a ship on the Detroit River sending out an SOS. Criminals have taken over the ship in order to steal the valuable experimental chemicals on board. Travis dons his Crimson Avenger costume, reaches the ship, and stops the crooks. Unfortunately, a fire has started on board which will set off the chemicals and destroy a better part of the city. Aware that he has only a week to live, the Avenger sends the entire crew to safety and takes the ship out to sea alone. The ship explodes, killing the Avenger, but saving Detroit. [Refer to DC Comics Presents #38 (Oct 1981) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: Infinity Inc. #11 (Feb 1985) places Lee Travis' death two years prior to the formation of Infinity, Inc.. Who's Who #5 (July 1985) places the hospital in New York City.]

8 years ago, in the city of Houston, Michael Carter, the nephew of Greg Sanders, becomes the Swashbuckler. [1st app. of the Swashbuckler in Detective Comics #493 (Aug 1980).]

7 years ago, two years his sacrifice, the surviving members of the Seven Soldiers of Victory verify that the Crimson Avenger has died. The Star-Spangled Kid sends Stripesy a telegram, but gets no response. They hold a memorial service at his gravesite, but Stripesy does not attend. The Kid, who hasn't heard from his ex-partner since shortly after their rescue from the past, decides to track him down. Sylvester finds Pat and his young son, Mike, in Pat's home outside of Vegas. Pat, needing money, has become indebted to a local mobster named "Boss" Weed. He has built an armored, high-speed vehicle for the mobster to clear his debt. However, when Weed comes for the vehicle, he takes Mike too. Sylvester learns that Pat ignored the telegram, and has ignored Syl because Pemberton Industries stole his patents. Sylvester explains that he was unaware that his cousin Arthur Pemberton stole the patents, and that he would make restitution. The duo then don their Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy costumes, put a stop to "Boss" Weed, and rescue Mike. Although still a member of the Justice Society, the Star-Spangled Kid begins to consider forming his own team. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #11 (Feb 1985) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: This issue refers to Mike Dugan as 6 years old, clearly an impossibility.]

After the Justice Society members reject their children's application to the team, the Star-Spangled Kid quits the Justice Society and forms Infinity, Inc., with the rejects as charter members. Hank King, Jr., the son of the golden age villain Brain Wave, joins the team as Brainwave, Jr.. [1st app. of Brainwave, Jr. in All-Star Squadron #24 (Aug 1983), 1st app. of Infinity, Inc. in All-Star Squadron #25 (Sep 1983) - #26 (Oct 1983) and Annual #2 (1983), origin in Infinity Inc. #1 (Mar 1984) - #2 (May 1984).]

The Star-Spangled Kid brings his cosmic belt, which sustained damage during a battle with the Ultra-Humanite, to Opal City for Ted Knight to repair. The Kid considers changing his code name to "Starman", but reconsiders when he realizes that Ted Knight is more proud of him than his own son Jack. Ted is disappointed when the Kid declines his offer to use the Starman name. The Kid leaves his gold-colored cosmic belt with Ted, who works all through the night to create a new, functional, red-colored belt. Ted has the golden age Flash make a special delivery of the new belt. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999).]

Brainwave, Jr. and the Star-Spangled Kid realize that they are related. Merry, Brainwave's mother and the Kid's adopted sister, never told her son her maiden name. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #3 (June 1984).]

The villain Brain Wave sacrifices his life to save his son, Brainwave, Jr., from the Ultra-Humanite. Before he dies, Brain Wave imparts to his son all of his mental power. Brainwave, Jr. re-christens himself Brainwave. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #10 (Jan 1985).]

6 years ago, the Star-Spangled Kid changes his name to Skyman. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #31 (Oct 1986) and Secret Origins [second ongoing] #9 (Dec 1986).]

5 years ago, under the influence of the Harlequin, Solomon Grundy and Mr. Bones cause the death of Skyman. The Dummy helps organize Injustice, Unlimited. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #51 (June 1988).]

A few months after Skyman dies, Maggie Shaw gets custody of Mike Dugan. She enrolls him at Civic City Military Academy. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

The Shining Knight promises Abby Arcane that he will locate her time-lost husband, the Swamp Thing. He begins his quest, searching various time periods for the missing Earth Elemental. [Refer to Swamp Thing [2nd series] #87 (June 1989).]

4 years ago, in the late Spring, Greg Sanders and Victor Leong travel to Dos Rios, Texas, to satisfy Greg's interest in costumed lawmen. As the Vigilante, Greg meets El Diablo, a local hero. Although it is not cost-effective to build a Round-Up restaurant in Dos Rios, the town does establish the Greg Sanders Museum there. [Refer to El Diablo #12 (Aug 1990) and Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

3 years ago, the Shining Knight returns to Abby Arcane with news of the Swamp Thing. Although less than two years has passed for Abby, twenty years has passed for Sir Justin. [Refer to Swamp Thing [2nd series] #109 (July 1991).]

2 years ago, Brainwave goes mad with guilt over the powers that his father left him. The bad things his father used those powers for took form in his mind, convincing him he must be evil to make his father proud. With other villains by his side, he attacks the Justice League. Maxima uses her mental abilities to get into Brainwave's mind, breaking the control that the guilt has over him. [Refer to Infinity Inc. #10 (Jan 1985) and Extreme Justice #14 (Mar 1996) - #18 (July 1996).]

1 year ago, Greg Sanders calls his old shooting buddy, Max Crandall, for help. Greg has bought Mesa City with the intent of turning it into a dude ranch, however strange accidents have been occurring. Max Crandall and Bart Allen, as Max Mercury and Impulse, help to defeat the culprit, Harvey McTeague. [Refer to Impulse Annual #2 (1997).]

Less than a year ago, Pat Dugan marries Barbara Whitmore, a resident of Beverly Hills. Barbara's daughter, Courtney, is less than thrilled that she now has a new step-father. Barbara has yet to tell Courtney what has become of her natural father. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

Mere months ago, the Shining Knight contacts Pat Dugan in Beverly Hills about strange goings on in Blue Valley. Against his step-daughter's wishes, Pat moves his new family to Blue Valley. Before Pat arrives, the Shining Knight becomes engaged in battle with the Dragon King, his daughter Shiv, and their minions. His mind is all but destroyed during the ordeal. He later re-appears, dazed, in his cover as the high school janitor. When Pat arrives in Blue Valley, he is unable to locate his old friend. In his basement, Pat Dugan completes work on S.T.R.I.P.E., a new computerized body armor which he hopes will aid him against the Blue Valley menace. It was developed with the help of Dr. Robert Crane, formerly known as the golden age Robotman. Pat had asked Crane for his old body parts, and he was happy to oblige. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999), #1 (Aug 1999), #2 (Sep 1999), #7 (Feb 2000), and #8 (Mar 2000).]

Courtney Whitmore, step-daughter of Pat Dugan, rummages through the boxes used in the move to Blue Valley. She comes across the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy's old costumes and some newspaper clippings. She recognizes Pat as Stripesy. Courtney makes herself a new Star-Spangled Kid costume to wear to that night's Blue Valley Soldiers football rally, which has a patriotic theme. She not only wants to get Pat's goat by wearing the costume, because he volunteered to chaperone the dance, but also hopes to get the attention of a boy she likes. At the rally, Pat spots Courtney and notices that she is wearing the cosmic belt. When the dance is attacked by the minions of the Dragon King, the cosmic belt activates and Courtney discovers she has acquired enhanced strength and speed. Pat rushes to his nearby home and returns in the S.T.R.I.P.E. armor. The two chase off the attackers. Pat is furious at Courtney, who refuses to give up her new costumed identity. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999) and #1 (Aug 1999).]

The new Star-Spangled Kid joins the Justice Society. [Refer to JSA #4 (Nov 1999).]

An aged Gimmick Girl reappears with Old Justice, whose agenda is to shut down Young Justice before they get hurt. [Refer to Young Justice #16 (Jan 2000).]

Pat Dugan is shocked when the Red Tornado informs him that Merry Pemberton, the Gimmick Girl, is still alive. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #6 (Jan 2000).]

The Nebula Man rises from Wing's grave in the Himalayas. The monks who had buried Wing in 1948 were unaware that the body of the fallen hero had absorbed the radiation and energy of the creature. It reconstructed the body into a new form, reawakening the Nebula Man. The cosmic entity remembers it's mission ... destroy this world! The Nebula Man wipes out the monks and their peaceful monastery. Back in Blue Valley, Pat Dugan is in his basement lab with Dr. Robert Crane and Crane's robot dog, Robbie. Robbie digs out the old nebula rod from one of the boxes. Pat is surprised to see that it is glowing. Pat explains to Crane that this rod was one of the prototypes that he had built. It disperses cosmic energy, instead of absorbing it like the cosmic belt. The Nebula Man is drawn to the nebula rod and attacks. He declares that he has come to complete his mission of destruction, to destroy Earth, take the energy as his own, and end his pain. Pat attacks the Nebula Man with the nebula rod, but the creature breaks it. The Nebula Man states he had homed in on this one weapon, which emits the same frequency as he does. Once he absorbs the energy from all of Earth's cosmic devices, he'll have enough power to conquer anyone who stands in his way. Unfortunately for Courtney, she uses her cosmic belt in gym class at that very moment to give her an edge, attracting the Nebula Man. While on the school bus, the creature locates her and attacks. Pat contacts Ted Knight and tells him to call the Justice Society. Courtney, who changes into her Star-Spangled Kid garb, battles the Nebula Man over her cosmic belt. When she spots a picture of Benjamin Franklin flying a kite in an electrical storm, she gets an idea. Courtney ties her cosmic belt to a downed phone line, and throws the belt into the heart of the creature, grounding and dispersing it. S.T.R.I.P.E. arrives, followed by a crowd of super-heroes, only to discover that the new Star-Spangled Kid has already dealt with the problem. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #7 (Feb 2000) and #8 (Mar 2000).]

Mike Dugan (age ~9) leaves the Civic City Military Academy and arrives in Blue Valley to pay a surprise visit to his father. Pat tells his son and step-daughter about the last mission of the Seven Soldiers of Victory. Mike then informs his father that he has left the Military Academy to move in with them. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #8 (Mar 2000) and #9 (Apr 2000).] [Note: Mike Dugan's age is deduced from Guide To The DCU 2000 #1 (Mar 2000).]

In Detroit, a new Crimson Avenger appears. In St. Louis, someone takes the Spider's old archery bow. [Refer to Stars And S.T.R.I.P.E. #9 (Apr 2000).]

Weapons and Powers: The Crimson Avenger, Wing, the Star-Spangled Kid, Stripesy, the Vigilante, Stuff I, and Stuff II were all highly skilled hand-to-hand combatants. Wing, Stuff I, and Stuff II were all trained in the martial arts. The Vigilante and Billy Gunn were both excellent marksman. The Shining Knight wore enchanted armor which repelled bullets, wielded a magic sword, and rode on a winged horse. The Spider was a skilled archer.

Comments: The history of the Seven Soldiers of Victory was greatly affected by the Crisis on Infinite Earths. The Earth-Two Green Arrow and Speedy ceased to exist when the universes collapsed. They were retroactively replaced, at various times, by the Spider, Billy Gunn, and Stuff the Chinatown Kid I and II.



dnewton
Member
posted January 19, 2003 12:29 AM

Outpost:
I thought you already covered item 161?



dudley soames
Member
posted January 19, 2003 10:32 AM

Hello,
I'd like to know more about:

30 Arsenal Nicholas Galtry
47 Batman 2050 (I'll have try to those issues)
79 Captain Marvel (android)

I should look before I open my mouth, but I think the Force of July was in the short lived ANARKY series. Is Captain Fear the same Cap'n Fear from a BATMAN book a few years ago?

Hellst0ne
Member
posted January 19, 2003 11:22 AM

Heaven, I'm in Heaven...

I so totally and absolutely LOVE this thread.

Just a correction about dibs and asterisks, outpost2. The Extremists are already covered (with the Assemblers and the Justifyers), but the Sponge Man is not. (Although I'm working on him right now...)

Regards.

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 19, 2003 02:53 PM

And I tried to be soooo careful compiling that new list. Well, a few mistakes isn't bad out of 537 entries, right?

If anyone notices any other errors, please let us know. Thanks.

Dudley, Arsenal (Nicholas Galtry) and Captain Marvel (the android) have already been covered. I'll snag Batman 2050, unless you want to take a stab at him.



Continental Op
Member
posted January 19, 2003 04:49 PM

Here's one that's really obscure. I've been hoping someone would bring him up, because I was rereading some old books from the late 80s lately, and I noticed a subplot that never seemed to be resolved...

DEKAN DRACHE

Seems to be the creation of RJM (Randy and Jean-Marc) Lofficier, who were doing a lot of co-plotting on certain DC titles in the late 80s. I don't remember if the character even appeared on-camera at all.

Drache was apparently one of those villainous industrialist types, and had ties to an ex-Nazi scientist type named Dr. Cornelius, who was head of the Cornelius-Krieg company that was an ongoing subplot in BLUE BEETLE. They had a super-villain enemy of the Beetle's named Catalyst working for them. I think this also crossed over into an issue or two of NEW TITANS. And there was some kind of interplay with the Global Guardians subplot going on in the Giffen JUSTICE LEAGUE books at the time as well.

To further complicate things, the Zatanna issue of SECRET ORIGINS around this time mentioned Dekan Drache as an insane sorcerer in the early part of the 20th Century, who was destroyed and became a human host for the spirit of (get this) the Justice League's old enemy Felix Faust, who was suddenly supposed to be thousands of years old. No connection to the other Drache was specified.

BLUE BEETLE was cancelled, and Roy Thomas brought the Lofficiers with him to Marvel when he left DC, so I don't think anyone ever explained what the hell the deal was with Drache or Cornelius-Krieg.

I know that Felix Faust has appeared several times since then, and Catalyst turned up as one of the Captains of Industry, most recently working for Kobra in JSA. But I don't think the Lofficier subplots were ever addressed anywhere.

How's THAT for obscure??



outpost2
Member
posted January 20, 2003 07:39 PM

Summarizing an entry from Michael L. Fleisher's Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes vol. 2...

Tara Terruna

First appearance: Wonder Woman [1st series] #59 (May-June 1953)

Wonder Woman is hurled across a mysterious time warp into a parallel world by a freak electrical storm. This planet exists simultaneously alongside Earth, but in a different era. Everyone on this world appears to be a double of someone on Earth. Wonder Woman encounters her own double, a woman called Tara Terruna (which means "Wonder Woman" in the native language). Wonder Woman helps her counterpart battle and defeat the evil Duke Dazam. She then returns home through the same time warp that had brought her to this strange twin world.



FF TLSOK
Member
posted January 20, 2003 07:47 PM

I can think of at least one obscure DC Comics character off the top of my head...

Strange Visitor.



Positive Man
Member
posted January 21, 2003 12:00 AM

How about Dr. Tyme (DOOM PATROL v1 #92)?



Mikel Midnight
Member
posted January 21, 2003 07:35 AM

Originally posted by outpost2:


Summarizing an entry from Michael L. Fleisher's Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes vol. 2... Tara Terruna
First appearance: Wonder Woman [1st series] #59 (May-June 1953)
Wonder Woman is hurled across a mysterious time warp into a parallel world by a freak electrical storm. This planet exists simultaneously alongside Earth, but in a different era. Everyone on this world appears to be a double of someone on Earth. Wonder Woman encounters her own double, a woman called Tara Terruna (which means "Wonder Woman" in the native language). Wonder Woman helps her counterpart battle and defeat the evil Duke Dazam. She then returns home through the same time warp that had brought her to this strange twin world.


Holy crap! I must learn more details about this character! Anyone out there with this issue?



Koppy McFad
Member
posted February 08, 2003 01:50 AM

Here is an obscure character in comics-- but not in American history:

AARON BURR

In the DC Universe, the third vice-president of the United States is not only alive but living in outer space.

This was shown in the Green Lantern back features that used to appear in THE FLASH after Hal lost his own book.

In FLASH # 230-231 (published sometime in the 1970s), Jordan sees a trainload of exhibits for the forthcoming Bicentennial being hijacked into space by robots disguised as American colonists.

He tracks the robots to their mothership and finds Aaron Burr, still in 1700s garb, sitting inside, mastermind of the whole affair. Thinking Burr is a robot like all the others, he agrees to an old-fashioned "duel" and then tries to short circuit Burr, only to find out he is the real thing.

Burr then recounts how he was taken into outer space the day before his historic duel with Alexander Hamilton in 1804. The inhabitants of a strife-ridden world needed a statesman to lead them and of all the people in the universe, they chose Burr.

A duplicating machine created a perfect copy of Burr which was sent back to Earth in his place, to take part in the duel with Hamilton.

Since that time, Burr has been reforming the alien society while being kept young by their technology.

Aaron says he borrowed the Bicentennial exhibit because he was homesick and just wanted to see some artifacts of his own era.

A huge, hulking, artificial life-form/manservant of Burr's then tries to assassinate him under the command of some reactionary cabal on the alien planet. Hal naturally saves Burr. He then takes Burr back to Earth for a last look at his old home. A tearful Burr recalls how much he missed the Earth but he is needed at his new home so he returns to space.

This story, by Denny O'Neil and Dick Dillin, was clearly intended to tap into the interest in the Bicentennial which was just about one or two years away.

What makes it odd is the choice of Aaron Burr, of all American figures, as being the supposed great reformer who can singlehandedly save an alien culture.

In history, Burr is highly controversial for secessionist plots and his great ambition. Not to mention, his killing of Hamilton in a duel. Jefferson and Washington both didn't like him. Some people even see Burr as a would-be tyrant, yet Denny O'Neil, the flaming liberal of comics in the 70s, makes Burr the hero of this story, depicting him as wise, selfless, and compassionate.

I wonder why Denny didn't choose Thomas Jefferson or Benjamin Franklin or John Adams or any of the other founding fathers?

Oh well. Liberals seem to like Burr. Gore Vidal seemed enarmoured of Aaron Burr too.



MrMGL
Member
posted February 08, 2003 11:52 AM

After reading the entry for Aaron Burr, it got me thinking about other real world figures in the DC Universe.

JACK THE RIPPER

In DCU VILLAINS SECRET FILES & ORIGINS, an incarnation of the Resurrection Man battles Vandal Savage who had just murdered a woman in White-Chapel, London in 1884. This murder was very similar to the murders that would be committed by the mysterious Jack the Ripper several years later. Was Jack the Ripper actually Vandal Savage or did Savage inspire someone else to become Jack the Ripper several years later?

In Grant Morrison's DOOM PATROL, a strange being named Redjack (I think) claimed to have some connection with Jack the Ripper.

In Karl Kesel's SUPERBOY, there was a Jack the Ripper type character. I think he was a clone of the original Jack the Ripper. I don't remember the details.

Were there any other Jack the Ripper appearances/ connections/ references in the DCU???



IAmHungry
Member
posted February 08, 2003 04:28 PM

Could Redjack be a Star Trek reference to that entity that killed women and then framed Scotty for the murders?



outpost2
Member
posted February 08, 2003 08:00 PM

THE BATMAN OF 2045-2050

History:

By 2045, Mr. Cohen had become a world-class gymnast, and a doctoral candidate in criminology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. He idolized the original Batman, and was researching a thesis on the hero's spectacularly brilliant career. Although Batman's true identity had never been revealed to the world, Cohen had deduced it. Beneath abandoned Wayne Manor, in the once proud suburbs of Gotham City, he discovered the original Batcave. He was down in the Hall of Trophies, taking notes and holograms, when the first hail of ICBMs shattered the northeast. World War III had begun. If he hadn't been sheltered far below ground, he might easily have been among the 150 million who died.

When Cohen finally emerged, it was to a scene of soul-numbing horror and devastation. Law and order were non-existent. Plunder gangs roved everywhere -- looting, raping, venting their mindless rage amid the ruins of a world that had gone insane. Miraculously, both his parents had survived the cataclysm. His mother, Miriam Cohen, was a rabbi who, among her other humanitarian concerns, had campaigned fruitlessly but tirelessly for handgun control. His father, Kenneth Cohen, had served as a top-level disarmament negotiator under three administrations. From them, he had inherited a compassion for victims of violence and a fervent desire for world peace. But compassion was in short supply after the holocaust, while the desire for scapegoats seemed to have no end.

One organization of crazed fanatics, the National Reconstruction Alliance, focused their hatred on two groups: advocates of arms control ... and Jews. Unfortunately for them, Cohen's parents were both. They were murdered in cold-blood one night while walking the streets of the city. There was no way he could ever bring them back, but he could do something to help bring back the civilized values they'd believed in ... the values they'd taught him to believe in. It was then that he remembered the Batman.

Cohen established a headquarters in the Statue of Liberty, and created his own bat-costume, equipping it with special features suitable to his place and time. And in memory of his parents, he made a solemn vow. As long as he lived, there would be no firearms allowed in New York ... and God help anyone who tried to stop him from keeping that vow.

The new Batman was last seen in 2050, when the time-lost gunfighter named Jonah Hex was tricked by the criminal organization called the Combine into believing that Batman had kidnapped Hex's friend, Stiletta.

Appearances:

Hex #11 (Jul 1986) "Night Of The Bat"
Hex #12 (Aug 1986) "Siege Of The Terminators"
Hex #13 (Sep 1986) "The Dogs Of War" (behind-the-scenes)



outpost2
Member
posted February 08, 2003 08:04 PM

Oops. I meant to mention that 90% of the above text is lifted directly from HEX #11, which was written by Michael Fleisher.



Koppy McFad
Member
posted February 19, 2003 12:26 AM

Hey, now that Speed Saunders is a supporting character in the HAWKMAN book, how about someone doing some Speed?

Bad pun, but seriously.....



IceMaster14
New Member
posted February 19, 2003 02:01 AM

Hey, I know a bit about #101 (the Global Guardians portion).

What do you need to know?



Rajah
Member
posted February 19, 2003 02:58 AM

THE BLACK BAT

As part of the special double-sized BATMAN #600 that kicked off the "Bruce Wayne: Fugitive" saga, the DC editorial staff decided to include several backup features of "previously unprinted Batman stories". The first of these was "The Mystery of the Black Bat!", a time-travel tale that appeared to be from the lighthearted Batman comics of the 1950s, most likely illustrated by Dick Sprang or Sheldon Moldoff, though "these stories had no credits listed".

Watching the excavation of an old mining town outside Gotham on television, Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson are astounded when the visiting scientist unveils his discovery-- a dime novel from the 1870s called "The Black Bat Rides". The cover of this book features a Batman-like character said to have been based off a historical figure of the time. Intrigued, Bruce and Dick decide to pay a visit to their friend Professor Carter Nichols, creator of a wondrous time machine that has sent them on adventures in many different eras.

Nichols successfully transports them to the 1870s where they promptly change into their Batman and Robin personas. Soon after, they meet Samuel Braxton, a tall black man in a tattered Union uniform. The Dynamic Duo help Braxton fight a group of Confederate soldiers and Braxton is quite taken by the heroes' dramatic (and somewhat frightening) costumes. Batman and Robin continue helping Braxton as he continues his duties as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, helping escaped slaves. The Gotham heroes agree to guide a group of former slaves to freedom while Braxton attends to another mission. As a parting gift, they give him a batarang to remember them by.

Batman and Robin's group is soon taken by surprise and attacked by a Confederate patrol. The soldiers tie the heroes up, mistaking them for Northern spies. Suddenly, a batarang whizzes by and cuts their bonds. The menacing figure of the Black Bat comes riding down the hill and the three costumed champions soundly defeat the soldiers. After the commotion, the Black Bat removes his mask to reveal Samuel Braxton. Influenced by Batman's costume and the awe and fear it inspires, Braxton had decided to spook the soldiers. Seeing the effectiveness of this tactic, he decides to continue helping people as the Black Bat.

Batman and Robin soon feel themselves being drawn back to the present and quickly change back to their civilian clothes. Yet they are left with a conundrum-- was Samuel always the Black Bat or did he become the Black Bat because of their visit to his era? If they inspired him, where did the dime novel that prompted their trip in the first place originate? It's enough to make a crimefighter's head spin.

Just as astounding to the readers of BATMAN #600 is that the tale of the Black Bat is actually not a "lost" Batman story at all. It and several other backup features were created specifically for the issue. "The Mystery of the Black Bat" was in fact scripted by Ed Brubaker and drawn by James Tucker as a homage to that era. In hindsight, this seems obvious. The story was sursprisingly progressive for the conservative 50s and very aware of the paradoxes of time travel.

However, I must admit that for a while, I myself was suckered in by this charming (and misleading) story.

(HISTORICAL NOTE: The Black Bat is also the name of a pulp hero of the 1930s that bore a striking similarity to Batman. His origin may have had an influence on Two-Face's backstory as well. This guy's real though, folks. Honest.)



David Bedford
Member
posted February 19, 2003 08:02 AM

Originally posted by MrMGL:


Were there any other Jack the Ripper appearances/ connections/ references in the DCU???

In SUPERGIRL, Buzz was seen as the man who inspired the Ripper (or someone strikingly similar) to commit his crimes.



outpost2
Member
posted February 19, 2003 11:48 AM

Originally posted by IceMaster14:


Hey, I know a bit about #101 (the Global Guardians portion). What do you need to know?

I gave an overview of The Global Guardians back in Round V, but feel there are a lot of details that could be added. Read the entry at www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/msgboards/obscurechars5 and decide if there is anything you can add. Welcome aboard!



outpost2
Member
posted March 01, 2003 10:10 PM

Recently added:

0.9 Aaron Burr
45.1 Bat-Hombre (Batman #56)
46.1 Batman, Junior (Detective #231)
47.1 Batman of 3000 AD (Batman #26)
47.2 Batman of the 31st century (Batman #67, Detective #216)
47.3 Batman of the far future (Batman #105)
47.4 Batman of Zur-en-arrh (Batman #113)
95.1 Chief Man-of-the-Bats and Little Raven (Batman #86)
122.1 Dekan Drache
129.1 Dr. Tyme (Doom Patrol v1 #92)
236.1 Jack the Ripper
440.1 Speed Saunders (Detective #1-58?, current Hawkman series)
455.1 Strange Visitor (Superman titles)
471.1 Tara Terruna
484.1 Tiger Man (Batman #93)
538 Zorn (Batman #102)


Recently completed:

0.9 Aaron Burr
47 Batman of 2045-2050
54 the Black Bat
122.1 Dekan Drache
236.1 Jack the Ripper
412 the Seven Soldiers of Victory / the Law's Legionnaires (golden age)
471.1 Tara Terruna



outpost2
Member
posted March 01, 2003 10:12 PM
Some people pointed out a few errors to me in the list on page one, so I went back and took a closer look. I don't know how it happened, probably a screw-up when I was editing in Excel, but somehow the asteriskes indicating "remaining entries" got totally jumbled. To save space, I'm just going to post the remaining "to do" list, so ignore what you saw on page one and go with this one. Hopefully, this time, I'll get it right.

Remaining entries:

* 6 All-Star (Justice League Adventures #13)
* 7 Alpha the Experimental Man (1962) (Detective #307)
* 8 Arin the Armored Man (1970's/1990's) (Jimmy Olsen #146, Superman v2 #??)
* 12 the Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man (Doom Patrol v1 #89,95)
* 14 the Annihilator and son (Action #355-357)
* 18 Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel) (Adventure #266)
* 19 Aquagirl II (Selena) (World's Finest v1 #133)
* 20 Aquagirl III (Tula) (Aquaman v1 #33, Crisis #10, more)
* 21 Aquarius (JLofA #74-75)
* 29 the Arrows of Alaska (Adventure #260)
* 34 Astra, Girl of the Future (Sensation #99-103)
* 42 Azrael I (Tales Of The Teen Titans #52, more)
* 45 Bard the Rainmaker (Tales Of The Unexpected #??)
* 45.1 Bat-Hombre (Batman #56)
* 46.1 Batman, Junior (Detective #231)
* 47.1 Batman of 3000 AD (Batman #26)
* 47.2 Batman of the 31st century (Batman #67, Detective #216)
* 47.3 Batman of the far future (Batman #105)
* 47.4 Batman of Zur-en-arrh (Batman #113)
* 50 Belphegor (See Item #101.)
* 58 Black Thorn (Vigilante #45, more)
* 68 Brother Power the Geek (Brother Power The Geek #1, Swamp Thing v2 Annual #5, Vertigo Vision-The Geek #1, Totems #1)
* 70 the Bushmaster (See Item #101.)
* 71 B'wana Beast / Freedom Beast (See Item #101.)
* 75 Captain Compass (Star-Spangled #83, more)
* 76 Captain Fear (Adventure #425-427,429,432,433, Unknown Soldier v1 #254-256, Spectre v3 #40-41, more?)
* 80 the Captains of Industry <-- needs more info
* 85 Cascade (See Item #101.)
* 87 Cathy Perkins (Wonder Woman v1 #184-187,194,203, more?)
* 89 Centrix (See Item #101.)
* 90 the Chain Gang War (Chain Gang War #1-12)
* 95.1 Chief Man-of-the-Bats and Little Raven (Batman #86)
* 96 Chrysalis (See Item #101.)
* 99 Claw the Unconquered (Claw #1-12, Star Hunters #7, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Warlord v2 #48-49, Swamp Thing v2 #163)
* 101 the Club of Heroes / the Global Guardians <-- needs more info
* 103 Colonel Future (Superman v1 #378,399)
* 105 the Conglomerate (JLQ #1,8,12, more)
* 107 the Conqueror (Super Friends #45,46)
* 108 the Conqueror of Barren Earth (Warlord v1 #63-65,67-70,72-74,76-88, Conqueror Of Barren Earth #1-4)
* 109 the Cossack (Showcase #96??)
* 113 Crusader (Aquaman v1 #56)
* 121 the Dazzler (Green Lantern v2 #49)
* 124 El Diablo (western hero) (All-Star Western v2 #2-5,7,10-11, Weird Western v1 #12-13,15-17,10, Jonah Hex #56-60, Swamp Thing v2 #85)
* 126 the Dingbats of Danger Street (1st Issue Special #6, Advs Of Superman #549)
* 128 Doctor Mist (See Item #101.)
* 129.1 Dr. Tyme (Doom Patrol v1 #92)
* 130 the Dogs of War (Hex #13-17)
* 136 Edge (Bloodlines)
* 139 the Eliminator (Action #379)
* 141 the Endless One (JLofA #??)
* 145 Faith (JLA #69, more)
* 148 Fireball (Young All-Stars #22-26)
* 153 Firestar (???)
* 156 Fleur-de-lis (See Item #101.)
* 161 the Force of July (Batman And The Outsiders Annual #1, more)
* 163 the Forgotten Heroes (Action #536,539,540,545,552,553, DC Comics Presents #77,78, Resurrection Man #24-27, Superman:MOS #120, more)
* 164 the Forgotten Villains (DC Comics Presents #77,78)
* 169 Futurio (Super Friends #39)
* 170 Futurio-XX (Super Friends #43)
* 173 the Gaucho (See Item #101.)
* 175 Godiva (See Item #101.)
* 179 Goody Rickles (Jimmy Olsen #139,141)
* 181 Grax (Action #342, #417, Super Friends #7-9,38)
* 184 Greenback (Super Friends #5)
* 185 Green Fury / Green Flame / Fire (See Item #101.)
* 188 the Green Team (1st Issue Special #2, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Advs Of Superman #549)
* 189 Green Thumb (Super Friends #42)
* 193 the Hacker Files (Hacker Files #1-12, more?)
* 195 Hayoth (Suicide Squad v1 #45, more)
* 196 Hazard (Infinity Inc #34-36, more)
* 199 Helix (Infinity Inc. #17, more)
* 205 the Hero Group (JLQ #5)
* 209 Hook (Bloodlines)
* 213 the Human Target (Action #419, more)
* 216 the Hybrid (New Teen Titans v2 #24, more)
* 218 Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus (Superboy v1 #144)
* 220 Icemaiden I (See Item #101.)
* 221 Icemaiden II / Ice (See Item #101.)
* 227 Impala (See Item #101.)
* 229 the Intergalactic Patrol (Adventure #260)
* 234 Jack O'Lantern I (See Item #101.)
* 235 Jack O'Lantern II (See Item #101.)
* 236 Jack O'Lantern III (Primal Force #0, 1-14)
* 237 Dr. Janet Kliburn of S.T.A.R. (various Superman titles)
* 240 Jason Bard (Detective #392, more)
* 242 Jediah Rikane I (Starman) (Adventure #467, more)
* 243 Jediah Rikane II / Power Lad / Power Boy (Adventure #354, Superboy & LSH #240, LSH v2 #304, LSH v3 #12,14, LSH v4 #15,17)
* 245 Jeff Sloane (Adventure #413-415,419, Supergirl v1 #1-2, World's Finest #274-277, JLofA #202)
* 246 Jemm, Son of Saturn (Jemm #1-12, JLA #11-12,15, Martian Manhunter v2 #6,13-16, more)
* 253 Johnny Witts (Detective #344, Batman #201, Super Friends #26)
* 255 Jonny Double (Showcase #78, more)
* 257 Judge Kobold, The Twice-Cursed Man (Secrets Of Haunted House #31)
* 258 Justa Lotta Animals (Captain Carrot #14-15)
* 259 the Justice Experience (Chase #6; Martian Manhunter v2 #17,20,22,36)
* 261 the "Justice League" of another world (Super Friends #10)
* 263 Kathy Warren (Superboy v1 #176, 191)
* 264 King Faraday (Danger Trail v1 #1, more)
* 265 Kingslayer (Super Friends #11)
* 268 the Knight I and the Squire II (See Item #101.)
* 269 the Knights of the Galaxy (Mystery In Space #1-8)
* 272 Kraklow (Rip Hunter #28, DC Comics Presents #77-78)
* 273 Kuei (Young All-Stars #22-26)
* 275 Lady Quark, Lord Volt, Princess Fern (Crisis #4, DC Comics Presents #94, Starman v1 #8, more)
* 277 Lando, Man of Magic (World's Best #1, World's Finest #2-7)
* 279 the Legionary (See Item #101.)
* 281 the Liquidator (Aquaman v1 #38)
* 282 the Little Mermaid (See Item #101.)
* 283 Little Miss Redhead (Sensation #72, more)
* 284 Lola Barnett (various Superman titles)
* 291 Malice (Female Furies) (???)
* 292 the Mamelukes (Suicide Squad v1 #45, more)
* 295 Manitou Raven (JLA #, more)
* 297 Marsboy (Superboy v1 #14, #16; Adventure #195)
* 302 Matt Savage, Trail Boss (Western #77, more)
* 304 the Menagerie Man (Super Friends #6,19,33)
* 305 Mento (Doom Patrol v1 #91, more)
* 309 Mikola Rostov (Warlord v2 #47,62-68)
* 311 Mighty Man (???)
* 313 Minstrel Maverick (All-American Western #103-122,124-126)
* 315 the Missile Men (Metal Men v1 #1,12,54,55, Metal Men v2 #3)
* 321 the Monocle (Super Friends #40)
* 325 the Musketeer (See Item #101.)
* 326 Mystek (Ray v2 #12, Justice League Task Force #30-#32)
* 327 Nadir, Master of Magic (New Adventure #17-30)
* 328 Naiad (Firestorm the Nuclear Man #90-93, more)
* 330 Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia (Action #354)
* 336 Nubia (Wonder Woman v1 #204,205,206, Supergirl v1 #9, Super Friends #25)
* 337 Nu'bia (Wonder Woman v2 Annual #8, Wonder Woman v2 #154-155)
* 342 the Olympian (See Item #101.)
* 344 Onyx (Green Arrow ally) (Detective #546, more)
* 345 Onyx (Deadman villain) (???)
* 351 Overlord I (Super Friends #11,14,15)
* 352 Overlord II / Underling (Super Friends #11,15,25,39,43)
* 353 Overthrow (Blue Beetle #17,20-21)
* 354 Owlwoman (See Item #101.)
* 357 the People's Heroes (Outsiders v1 #10, more)
* 358 Petronius (Lois Lane #3)
* 359 Phantasmo (See Item #101.)
* 360 Phoenix of Steel (Superman Family #187)
* 364 Power Lad (Jimmy Olsen #45)
* 365 Power-Man, King of Outer-Space (Lois Lane #??)
* 374 Pulsar (Superboy foe) (New Adventures of Superboy #31)
* 375 Pulsar (Karate Kid foe) <-- needs more info
* 381 the Ranger (See Item #101.)
* 382 the Recombatants (Tales Of The Teen Titan #48)
* 385 Red Trinity / Blue Trinity (Flash v2 #6,7, more)
* 388 Ringmaster (Flash v1 #261-264)
* 389 the Rising Sun (See Item #101.)
* 391 Robin Hood (Robin Hood Tales #1-14, B&B #5-15, more?)
* 393 Rokk and Sorban the cosmic gamblers (Superman v1 #171, World's Finest #150, Flash v1 #175, DC Comics Presents #79, Action Comics #582)
* 396 Roy Batty (???)
* 405 Scarab (hero) (Scarab #1-8, JSA #1-???)
* 408 the Seraph (See Item #101.)
* 413 the Seven Soldiers of Victory (silver age) (Silver Age: Showcase #1, Silver Age Secret Files #1)
* 420 Silverblade (Silverblade #1-12)
* 428 Skyrocket (Super Friends #4)
* 429 Slam Bradley <-- needs more info on modern apps.
* 433 the Sniper (Quality hero) (Military #5-34)
* 434 Solarman (Superman v1 #298)
* 436 Soyuz / the Red Stars (called Red Stars in Firestorm the NM #69, called Soyuz in #70-71, first in costume in #72-73, more?)
* 440.1 Speed Saunders (Detective #1-58?, current Hawkman series)
* 442 the Sponge Man (Challengers Of The Unknown v1 #47,51)
* 443 the Squire I (Young All-Stars #22-23,25-27) (See also Item #94.)
* 446 Stalker (Stalker #1-4, Swamp Thing v2 #163-164, the All Star v2 #1-2 event)
* 448 Starfire / Red Star (See Item #101.)
* 455.1 Strange Visitor (Superman titles)
* 472 the Tasmanian Devil (See Item #101.)
* 474 the Templar Knight (See Item #101.)
* 476 the Terrific Whatzit (McSnurtle the Turtle) (Funny Stuff #1, more)
* 479 the Third Archer (Andre Reynard) (Adventure #162)
* 481 the Three Musketeers (DC Special #22-25, more?)
* 484 Thunderlord (See Item #101.)
* 484.1 Tiger Man (Batman #93)
* 493 Tuatara (See Item #101.)
* 494 Tundra (See Item #101.)
* 499 Ultraa (post-Crisis) (JLQ #13, Justice League Europe #65, Justice League America #90, more?)
* 500 the Unimaginable (JLofA #42,44, Valor #5-10, Supermen Of America #1-6) <-- needs more info
* 508 the Viking Commando (All-Out War #1-6, Unknown Soldier v1 #266-267)
* 512 Warhead (Super Friends #36)
* 513 the Waterfront Warrior (Huntress v1 #14-16)
* 514 Watt the Question Man (All-Flash #21,29, more?)
* 517 Whirlicane (Action #457, Superman v1 #303)
* 521 the Wild Huntsman (See Item #101.)
* 524 Wingman (See Item #101.)
* 526 Wonder Boy (Quality hero) (National #1-26)
* 528 the Wondertwins (post-Crisis) (Extreme Justice #9, more)
* 530 the Writer (Suicide Squad #58)
* 531 the Wyoming Kid (Western Comics #1, more)
* 536 Yggardis, the Living Planet (Mystery In Space #60, DC Comics Presents #78) <-- needs more info
* 538 Zorn (Batman #102)



outpost2
Member
posted March 04, 2003 08:44 PM

Digging through some old "Obscure Batman Characters" archives, I discovered postings which cover the following characters:
101 the Club Of Heroes
135.1 the Eagle
173 the Gaucho
268 the Knight I and the Squire II
279 the Legionary
325 the Musketeer
381 the Ranger
443 the Squire I
524 Wingman



outpost2
Member
posted March 04, 2003 08:46 PM

Originally posted on the Batman message boards by
Mikishawm on August 20, 2000 09:46 PM :


By 1950, the legend of Batman had circled the globe. The tale of the man who built himself into a crime-fighting icon inspired imitators not just in the United States but across Europe and beyond. These are the stories of a few of them.


An English village known as Wordenshire was home to the Knight and Squire, a father and son team who were secretly the Earl of Wordenshire and Cyril. The Knight was clad in gold armor and chain mail while the Squire wore a matching tunic and archer's cap. Inspired by the story of the Bat-Signal, the duo arranged for the townspeople to sound the rectory bell whenever they were needed. These modern cavaliers rode into battle on unique motorcycles with horse's heads mounted on the front -- their war horses!

A few years earlier, Nazi spies had been captured near Stonehenge and were rumored to have hidden a fortune in stolen gold somewhere in the area. In the latter half of 1950, a band of Gotham crooks led by Matt Thorne (no relation to the Crime Doctor) learned of the gold and headed for the site of the spies' trial -- Wordenshire.

Batman and Robin pursued the gang to England and, inevitably, met their British counterparts. It was not an auspicious occasion. The Knight and the Squire entered the fray between the Dynamic Duo and the Thorne mob and unintentionally allowed the crooks to escape. Batman tried to lessen the embarrassment of the situation by suggesting that the foursome swap partners, allowing the relatively inexperienced British heroes to observe their idols in action.

Even this solution proved less than ideal. The Squire ended up a temporary hostage of Thorne, forcing Batman to stand idle while the gang fled from Stonehenge. Soon after, the Knight was nearly electrocuted, requiring Robin to save him while permitting Thorne to escape yet again.

Capping the whole disastrous affair was Thorne's discovery of the gold beneath the Earl of Wordenshire's own castle. Batman and Robin deferred to the Knight and Squire, allowing them to capture the villains on their home turf. Unfortunately, Thorne had spotted the war-horses in the Knight's version of the Batcave, deduced the hero's true identity and said as much to the assembled reporters and police. The theory failed to hold up under scrutiny, though, especially after the Earl and Cyril appeared opposite the Knight and Squire to inquire what was going on. As always, Batman and Robin's expertise with make-up and disguise was flawless (BATMAN # 62, art by Dick Sprang).


Within six months, another European Batman surrogate made his entry but, learning from the Knight and the Squire's mistakes, his country requested that the Dark Knight train him first. The prospective hero was a naturalized American who belonged to the European nationality. Simultaneously, Robin had suffered a broken leg and was forced to the sidelines for six weeks while Batman took Wingman (clad in a red and yellow costume) as his partner.

Almost immediately, paranoia sunk in and Dick Grayson became convinced he was going to be permanently replaced. Fueling his fears were comments among Gothamites that an adult made a more appropriate ally for Batman than a child and, even more devastating, a snatch of conversation that Dick overhead on his belt radio from Commissioner Gordon: "We don't need any Robin, Batman!"

The final blow came when Dick watched television footage in which Wingman flawlessly rescued Batman from a rooftop robbery. Back in the Batcave, the new hero refused to reveal his identity to the unmasked Robin. In tears, Dick confronted Batman later that evening only to learn that the Wingman he'd met earlier was Batman himself. He and Wingman had swapped identities for the night and Bruce had met Robin in that guise to test its effectiveness. If the Boy Wonder couldn't see through it, no one could. Commissioner Gordon's earlier comment, Batman added, had simply been a statement that the European nation didn't require a substitute Robin.

Embarrassed over his jealously, Dick couldn't help but express his elation that he and Batman were still going to be the Dynamic Duo (1951's BATMAN # 65, by Bill Finger, Sheldon Moldoff, and Charles Paris).


By late 1954, "The Batmen Of All Nations" had proliferated to a great enough degree that Batman decided to hold a formal conference for his counterparts in Gotham City -- inspired by a letter from Australia's Ranger. In addition to the Ranger, a masked man in a brown shirt and hat, those in attendance included France's sword-wielding Musketeer (clad in the trademark uniform), Italy's Legionary (armed with a lance and dressed like a Roman centurion), South America's Gaucho (renowned for his skill with the bolo) and, finally, the Knight and the Squire (DETECTIVE COMICS # 215, by Edmond Hamilton, Sheldon Moldoff, and Charles Paris).

The heroes arrived in Gotham to a spectacular tickertape parade and Batman began a quick overview of his techniques. Casting a pall over the proceedings was the boast of a mobster named "Knots" Cardine "to commit unprecedented crimes under the very noses of these great lawmen". Rising to the challenge, the heroes took off in the direction of Cardine's first reported robbery, the Gaucho and Ranger riding their horses, the Knight and Squire astride their vehicular counterparts, and the rest crammed into the Batmobile.

The gang managed to escape and, incredibly, evaded multiple roadblocks. Only the Legionary seemed to have spotted anything -- a distinctive series of scratches on the side of the getaway car, "as though by bushes -- so their hideout must be in a thickly-wooded country region". The fact that Batman had missed the clue -- and seemed to be at a loss to explain Cardine's getaway -- shook the confidence of the other Batmen, but they kept their opinions to themselves.

Riding with Batman and Robin, the Legionary spotted the bushes that he imagined had scratched Cardine's vehicle. Batman went ahead to investigate an abandoned house in the wooded area and the other heroes could only watch helplessly as the structure exploded in a fireball. The Dark Knight, it seemed, was dead.

With Gotham in a state of shock, the international heroes vowed to avenge him. Taking over as their leader, the Legionary observed that Batman "was a great man -- but only human. ... I believe 'Knots' Cardine set this death-trap to remove Batman so he could strike at that bank currency transferal Batman was to guard".

The Legionary offered to ride with the armored van and, at an opportune moment, pulled a gun on the driver. Cardine's gang poured out of the woods and the door of the truck was opened to reveal -- Batman! With the aid of the now-arriving Robin and the others, the thieves were quickly rounded up. The Legionary was unmasked as Cardine, who'd abducted the true Roman hero the moment he landed in the United States.

"His first 'clue' made me suspect him ... he was on the dark side of that getaway car and couldn't have seen those scratches on it." Suspicious, Batman allowed the Legionary to take the lead in the investigation. As a precaution, the Dark Knight threw his batarang into the supposed hideout and, when it exploded, he allowed Robin and the others to believe him dead until he could draw Cardine's gang into the open. "Knots" had kept his mob abreast of the heroes' plans thanks to "a walkie-talkie mike inside his helmet, with his spear for an aerial".

"To think that for a moment I doubted your ability, Batman!" the Musketeer admitted. "I apologize."

"Si," added the Gaucho. "There is, after all, only one real Batman in the world!"


In 1957, the international heroes (minus the Ranger) were gathered in the United States once more, this time at the invitation of Metropolis millionaire and philanthropist John Mayhew. Years before Maxwell Lord funded the Justice League, Mayhew offered Superman, Batman, Robin, and the others a skyscraper complex that he dubbed "The Club Of Heroes". He offered to sign over the deed for the property to whomever the group chose as their chairman (WORLD'S FINEST # 89, by Ed Hamilton, Dick Sprang, and Stan Kaye).

Superman and Batman each insisted that the other was most deserving and Mayhew was forced to suggest a solution: "Whoever performs the greatest feats in the next few days will be your chairman." In an amusing display of modesty, both Superman and Batman performed their subsequent crimefighting activities with as much discretion as possible -- even as the international heroes were downplaying their own efforts in favor of the two icons.

Abruptly, though, Superman was laid low by a mysterious illness reminiscent of Kryptonite poisoning and a new hero named Lightning-Man, clad in an orange costume with a purple cape and cowl, came on the scene. Even as Lightning-Man's displays of heroism racked up, from dispersing a tornado to preventing an airplane crash, Superman and Batman suspected the worst. They feared the new crimebuster wanted to claim the chairmanship of the Club -- and the property -- for himself.

As Superman's sick spells continued at twenty-four hour intervals, Batman began to form a new conclusion, one that the Man of Steel ultimately confirmed. A fragment of a Kryptonite asteroid had entered Earth's orbit. As it passed over Metropolis each day, Superman fell into a sickly, amnesiac state. "Your strong instincts to prevent disaster, and to keep your identity secret, still moved you to action," the Dark Knight explained. "And so, unaware who you really were, you yourself became Lightning-Man. And each time, when the Kryptonite amnesia-influence passed away, you couldn't remember that you'd been Lightning-Man."

To the cheers of the other heroes, Batman told the Man of Steel that "you won the chairmanship fairly as Lightning-Man ... so we insist that as Superman, you keep it."

"I might have known all the time," added Lois Lane, "NO ONE could ever top Superman, except himself!"


In 1958, Bill Finger (with Jack Kirby on the art) rewrote the DETECTIVE # 215 episode as a Green Arrow story in ADVENTURE COMICS # 250. "The Green Arrows Of The World" included the Bowman of the Bush, the Phantom of France, and archers from Japan, Mexico, Polynesia, and Switzerland. The fake hero in this episode proved to be the Bowman of Britain.


That was then.

This is now.

In the revised history of the DC Universe, the international heroes still existed but were no longer inspired by Batman and Robin. The earliest of these heroes was Percy Sheldrake, the young man destined to be the Earl of Wordenshire. His history was related in the Roy Thomas-scripted YOUNG ALL-STARS # 22 (1988):

"My father was ... killed in North Africa (in 1940). Just prior to my twentieth birthday (in early 1942), mother and I moved from Wordenshire village to London -- where we were promptly caught in one of the Luftwaffe's bombing raids." The Shining Knight rescued Percy but his mother had perished. With Winston Churchill at his side, "Sir Justin vowed at once to take me as his Squire, so that I could serve Great Britain in a very special way. He worked with me since then, whenever he was in England ... but kept me a secret, until quite recently."

With chainmail armoring his torso and a red bandana as a mask, Percy took the identity of the Squire and joined other international heroes in June of 1942 on a "morale-building" tour of the U.S. with the Young All-Stars. The All-Stars' Tigress became enamoured of the young Englishman but he quickly brushed away her advances, revealing that his wife and young son, Cyril, waited for him back in Britain. Riding astride the Shining Knight's flying horse, Winged Victory, the Squire fought off an attack by agents of Axis Amerika but was too late to save the life of the Tigress (YAS # 23).

In the wake of the final battle with Axis Amerika (YAS # 25), the Squire prepared to return to England (YAS # 26), first joining the Shining Knight and the Seven Soldiers of Victory in their battle with the Skull (YAS # 27, a post-Crisis account of LEADING COMICS # 5). "Just wait till (Cyril's) old enough to realize his dad was once Squire to the Shining Knight, from the days of King Arthur. Say -- perhaps, one day, I'll be a Knight, and my son will be MY Squire. Wouldn't THAT be a corker?"

During the same time, the Justice Society had embarked on a good will mission to Europe to deliver "food to starving patriots" (YAS # 27, based on ALL-STAR COMICS # 14). As explained in Thomas' 1986 INFINITY, INC. # 34 (using "historical concepts created by R.J.M. Lofficier"), "during the early 1950s, several recipients of the JSA's kindness, while having no super-powers themselves, became some of the first real costumed heroes to emerge outside the borders of the United States itself:"

"The Legionary, who had been a young anti-fascist Italian in the early 1940s; the Knight and the Squire: as a British subject, the father had spent the war as a P.O.W.; The Gaucho, who, though an Argentinian, had spied for the Allies inside Nazi Germany itself; The Musketeer, who'd been a member of the French Resistance, at home with either sword or firearms; and Wingman, who, though born in neutral Sweden, had fought as a youth with the Norwegian Underground."

In 1957, the metahuman immortal known as Doctor Mist urged the creation of "a supra-national organization code-named the Dome, headquartered in (a) mansion in Paris. ... At first, only the five masked Europeans operated under the Dome's supervision, the Gaucho having returned to Buenos Aires." As the years passed, more international heroes joined and eventually the team became known as the Global Guardians.

At least two of the original heroes were still semi-active in recent years. The Legionary was part of a Global Guardians investigation of a pharmaceutical company's role in the resurrection of Agent Axis (1987's BLUE BEETLE # 20, in an R.J.M. Lofficier subplot), while the second Squire (now Sir Cyril, Earl of Wordenshire) was a British spymaster (1988's NEW TEEN TITANS # 44, also scripted by the Lofficiers).


DETECTIVE # 215 and WORLD'S FINEST # 89, by the way, were reprinted in 1968's WORLD'S FINEST # 180 and 179, respectively, while ADVENTURE # 250 was reprinted in 1982's DC SPECIAL BLUE RIBBON DIGEST # 23.

A personal note: I've always taken a tiny bit of pride in the fact that, most likely, I played a role in the creation of the 1950s Global Guardians. In 1984, I had an article published in AMAZING HEROES # 50 that listed all of DC's international heroes. In addition to the relatively recent Global Guardians, I also included the Batmen of Many Nations and the truly obscure Wingman, whose sole 1951 appearance has never been reprinted. Imagine, my surprise, then, when Wingmen and the other 1950s heroes turned up in that issue of INFINITY, INC. I wonder if the Lofficiers read that article?



outpost2
Member
posted March 04, 2003 08:47 PM

Originally posted on the Batman message boards by
Hellstone on August 23, 2000 07:28 AM :


The latest sighting of Sir Cyril / Squire II was a one-panel appearance in JLA #26 (Feb 99) where he had taken the identity of Knight II and had a third, female Squire on his side. They were both part of the Ultra-Marine Corps of Superbia. (They were not identified/named in this story, but Grant Morrison later explained it in an interview.)



outpost2
Member
posted March 04, 2003 08:48 PM

Originally posted on the Batman message boards by
Mikishawm on January 06, 2001 02:18 PM :


Amateurs made Batman nervous. There were exceptions -- including, he'd grudgingly admit, Batwoman -- but generally the would-be crimefighters who'd used Gotham as their launching pad were more trouble than they were worth. Particularly those with hidden agendas. Even now, Deadshot weighed heavily on the Dark Knight's mind.

All of these thoughts ran through Batman's head on a summer evening in 1959 (BATMAN # 127, art by Dick Sprang and possibly written by Bill Finger). While making an appearance at the Gotham Book Fair, he and Robin had leaped into action to prevent the Joker's theft of the proceeds but found themselves locked in an armored car instead. In the darkened interior, the Dynamic Duo watched in astonishment as the reinforced metal doors crumpled before them. Of course, they must have thought, Superman was paying one of his frequent visits to Gotham.

Not quite, they soon learned -- unless the Man of Steel had taken to dressing like a bird. The stranger was covered head to toe in an orange/tan feathered costume, complete with sharpened claws on his hands and feet and a beak to match, brown tufts on his forearms and calves, a feathery brown cape, and a red chest icon displaying the United States' noble symbol. "I must conceal the secret of my REAL IDENTITY, gentleman, but you may address me as The Eagle. With my unusual powers, we can battle against crime side by side."

With the Dynamic Duo bringing up the rear, the Eagle pursued the Joker towards some of Gotham's ubiquitous giant props, in this case gargantuan replicas of books such as "Treasure Island" and "The Adventures of Robin Hood". Escaping the heroes through a passageway in "Doorway To Laughter", the villain cackled that "there's nothing like losing yourself in a good book!"

If Batman and Robin had been surprised by a new hero muscling into their team, they were completely thunderstruck to find him waiting for them in the Batcave. The Eagle was Alfred Pennyworth!

While cleaning the Batcave's trophy room, the butler had lost his balance and become entangled in the wires of a super-weapon confiscated from "Doc" Cranium. The weapon, in turn, fired a bolt of energy into a crystalline space artifact contributed by Superman. The crystal reflected the force back at Alfred and the end result, he declared, was that "I'm INVULNERABLE! I can LEAP hundreds of feet and LIFT a ton. You WILL accept me as a third member of your team, won't you?"

Alfred had always aspired to be a crimefighter, even going so far as to borrow Batman's costume early on and masquerade as the Dark Knight (1944's BATMAN # 22). And Batman had to acknowledge that he'd benignly supported such activities by asking his trusted friend to impersonate him on multiple occasions (BATMAN # 55, 87, 94, 117, 120). What else could he say but yes?

The following morning's encounter with The Joker seemed to fulfill all of Batman's misgivings. Displaying the grace of his namesake, the Eagle soared into the air towards the rogue's perch on a podium. Unfortunately, he overshot the Clown Prince of Crime, leaving evidence of his passage in two successive billboards. Even as the Joker was climbing to the safety of a helicopter and Batman and Robin were swinging towards him, the Eagle was attempting to salvage his first attempt by using super-strength to tear a giant net from the billboard he'd just damaged. Instead of snaring his target, the Eagle only succeeded in tangling his partners in the webbing.

Undeterred, the Eagle promised "an amazing example of super-strength coupled with super-ingenuity" as the Joker and his gang fled the Museum of Egyptology. Blocking the underpass on the escape route with a looming bronze statue of Anubis, the Eagle swooped in to knock the villain out cold. Ominously, the Joker laughed off the blow and responded with one of his own that rendered his opponent senseless. Diving into the fracas with a pair of chariots, Batman and Robin deflected the Joker and company's barrage of spears and left the entire gang sprawled on their backsides.

His powers now evaporated, Alfred took a degree of satisfaction in that evening's Gotham Globe, which played up the Eagle's role in the capture. "I guess I WAS pretty good, after all. A little more experience and I might have surpassed you and Robin."

"No doubt about it, Alfred," Batman smiled. "Lucky for us, you lost your powers."

Whatever Alfred's failings as a super-hero may have been, he was a truly good man and a selfless friend, facts that were proven beyond a shadow of a doubt only five years later. In 1964, taking the force of a falling boulder meant for Batman and Robin, Alfred Pennyworth gave his life for his friends (DETECTIVE # 328).

A medical examiner had confirmed that Alfred was dead and yet, against all reason, the noble butler was discovered days later in a state of semi-consciousness within his refrigerated crypt. The intervention of an eccentric scientist saved Alfred's life that night ... and unintentionally gave birth to the butler's dark side while he tried to restore his health. In possession of an impressive complement of psionic powers, the strange albino-like being declared himself the Outsider, sworn enemy of Batman and Robin (DETECTIVE # 356).

Did dormant super-energy in Alfred's body pull him back from the jaws of death -- and perhaps influence his transformation into the Outsider? The 24-hour career of the Eagle may have been more significiant than anyone realized.



outpost2
Member
posted March 17, 2003 08:59 PM

AQUAGIRL
Adventure Comics #266 (Nov 1959)
"Aquaman Meets Aquagirl!"

Lisa Morel studies marine life through the glass bottom of her yacht, when suddenly she sees a man trapped on the sea floor in the grip of a giant clam. She is so desperate to save him that she dives into the water without any breathing equipment, carrying only an underwater torch. She quickly recognizes the victim as Aquaman. Lisa works under the water for over five minutes before she finally frees him. Certain that the woman is about to drown, Aquaman rushes her to the surface.

Aquaman questions how Lisa survived under the water for so long, but she doesn't understand it herself. They decide to experiment and, after one hour underwater, Lisa claims she feels that she could last for many hours more. She mentions that her father is Dr. Hugo Morel, the famous ichthyologist, who has written many books on the natural history of fish. Aquaman suggests that they ask her father if he has any theories. Lisa races Aquaman through the water, and even swims up a waterfall, back to her home.

Lisa's parents cannot believe her remarkable claims, so she demonstrates by mentally commanding some seals swimming in the water nearby. Dr. Morel is amazed, and asks Aquaman to recount his own origins for possible clues. Aquaman tells them of how his Atlantean mother married his father, a lighthouse keeper. He also says his mother left him a diary about life in Atlantis. He then informs them that his hour on land has expired and he must return to the sea for the rest of the day.

The following morning, Aquaman returns to the Morel's home where he finds Lisa in a costume which is identical to his own. She explains that a few minutes after he left she began gasping for air, so she slept all night in their swimming pool. Lisa has named herself Aquagirl and says she can now join Aquaman on his sea patrols. He insists that she can't, and tells her not to ask why. She ignores him and dives into the sea.

The following day, Aquaman and Aquagirl help a chartered boat celebrate someone's birthday.

The next evening, they discover that an iceberg has floated into busy shipping lanes. Aquagirl fails to completely destroy the berg, so Aquaman uses luminous fish to warn the ships off.

The next day, as Aquagirl explores an undersea grotto to collect rare shells for her father, she suddenly can't breathe or swim, and feels the pressure of tons of water crushing her. Aquaman rescues his new "sidekick" and brings her to the surface. He says he expected this would happen, and tells her that she has permanently lost her powers.

Aquaman explains that, after he had left Lisa's house on the first day, he read through his mother's diary. He found the following passage: "Because of continuous seepage through the glass dome, our people had to adapt gradually to undersea life! However, some children were born who were throwbacks to an earlier era! They could adapt only a brief time to underwater life and would eventually die in Atlantis' watery world! These infants were ejected in waterproof lifeboats to the surface! However, those rare children rejected by Atlantis for their own survival's sake ... were sent upward only when a passing ship was spotted! This insured their being picked up alive!"

When Lisa asks what those infants have to do with her, Aquaman explains that his mother wrote that Atlantis' doctors were able to recognize every "throwback" at birth by a physical characteristic peculiar to them alone. They all have purple eyes ... just like Lisa's! The powers came to her suddenly because of the stressful situation of seeing him "drowning", but they were fated to vanish almost as suddenly.

Later, Dr. Morel admits that 20 years earlier, while cruising in his yacht, he spotted an infant in a lifeboat. The Morel's were childless, so they decided to raise Lisa as their own. Even though she is now powerless, Lisa Morel is thankful for her brief career as Aquagirl.



Xanadude
Member
posted March 17, 2003 09:14 PM

Outpost!

Thank you for posting the Aquagirl bio...

Now if someone could just find some info on the OTHER obscure Aquagirl that was around before Tula...



outpost2
Member
posted March 18, 2003 11:41 AM

You're very welcome, Xanadude. We lucked out on Lisa Morel because her story was reprinted recently in the AQUAMAN ARCHIVES. I too hope that someone else reading this has access to WORLD'S FINEST #133 and would do us the favor of summarizing the second Aquagirl story. Maybe I'll take a shot at the third Aquagirl (Tula), since I own her first appearance.



Hellst0ne
Member
posted March 20, 2003 01:29 PM

Resuming my duties...


THE SPONGE MAN (a.k.a. The Sponge)
Created by Arnold Drake and Bob Brown

PERSONAL DATA:

Alter Ego: Miklos
Occupation: Deep-sea sponge-diver
Known Relatives: None
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Florida, later at the bottom of the ocean
Height: (as Miklos) N/A (as Sponge Man) variable
Weight: (as Miklos) N/A (as Sponge Man) variable
Eyes: Blue
Hair: (as Miklos) black (as Sponge Man) none
Skin: (as Miklos) white (as Sponge Man) orange, sponge-like

First appearance: Challengers Of The Unknown [1st series] #47 (Dec 1965-Jan 1966)

HISTORY:

Miklos was a deep-sea sponge-diver who lived a rather good life on the coast of Florida. He earned enough money to live on, had a good apartment, and a shy, continous flirt with Lisa, the girl next door.

One day Miklos came upon a spectacular find at the bottom of the ocean, a strange sponge-like object, almost shaped like a man, rotted to a likewise peculiar, green-hued rock. While examining the thing, a vicious moray eel suddenly flashed by. Jerking aside, Miklos accidentally gashed his hand on the jagged rock. At first Miklos dismissed the injury as "just a scratch", but after bringing the strange sponge to the surface and carrying it home, his hand had begun to throb intensely, his body ached, and he just wanted a night's sleep.

When Miklos wakened the next morning, he was in for the shock of his life. His injured hand had... changed. And not only his hand, he discovered. His entire body had mutated into a freakish sponge-like being.

Knowing that the famous Challengers of the Unknown were in town testing diving gear, the desperate Miklos sought them out, figuring that they may be the only ones to help him. Arriving in Miklos' apartment, Prof Haley of the Challengers examined his find, concluding that the "rock" was actually a meteor possessing a freakish life-force that had been transmitted to Miklos through the cut on his hand.

Miklos lowered his voice and explained that this was not all of it. He had found out that by concentrating, he could now do strange things, absorbing water just like a sponge. But not only water - energy and sound could apparently be absorbed by his freakish body. Stunned, the Challs decided to take a sample of the meteor and test it, promising Miklos to do their best to counteract his condition.

What neither Miklos nor the Challengers were aware of, was that his next-door neighbor, a sinister man named Stacy, had overheard the entire conversation from the other side of the wall. When the Challs had left the building, Stacy came over to Miklos and explained that he knew of a doctor who could help him. Sadly, this doctor lived in another country and it would cost a fortune bringing him here and setting up a lab for him. Miklos answered that he was not a wealthy man and could not raise that kind of money. Stacy protested: "With your special powers, you could take it! In your condition, who would blame you?"

Miklos refused to steal to cure himself. But later that night, as the strange-looking man restlessly prowled the streets, he was tormented by the fact that people around him were repulsed by his appearance, even Lisa, the girl next door.

The next day, the Challengers discovered Miklos on the streets and gasped in shock as the Sponge Man started to absorb all color in the area, leaving a black and white world in his trail. Shortly afterwords all sound was absorbed as well. Without functioning traffic lights, the traffic was stuck in a jam. And without sound, the police were not reached by the burglar alarm of a nearby bank, from which Stacy ran out with a big loot. The Challs attempted to stop Stacy, but the Sponge Man then absorbed all their strength, leaving them unconscious. Lying in the streets, the Challengers would have been killed by a driverless truck, had they not been saved by Miklos. Miklos explained that he wished them no harm but that Stacy and the stolen money was his only way to be cured.

The Challs of course realized that Stacy had tricked Miklos. After a wild chase, they were able to approach him and let him catch a glimpse of Stacy's police record, proving that Stacy was a cheap crook. As Miklos realized the terrible truth of the revelation, his mind snapped. In a state of shock, he left the Challs and Stacy behind him, wandering aimlessly, absorbing all water in his path, and growing as he did.

Prof theorized that the Sponge Man would continue to drain the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Ships would strand, populations would thirst while the creature would grow bigger and bigger until he eventually would become bigger than the Earth.

To ensure that the worst would not happen, the Challengers prepared a lake with tranquilizing chemicals, in hope of putting the Sponge Man to sleep. The Sponge Man absorbed the body of water, and the Challengers' plan had nearly succeeded when a forest fire started near the lake. While the Challs evacuated the area, the tranquilized Sponge Man was nearly consumed by the flames. Suddenly, the cry of a child pierced his dulled mind. A frightened little girl was trapped in the midst of the fire while the Challengers helplessly watched. But the cry made the giant Sponge Man regain his senses. With a final effort, he lurched to his feet and let the water of his body pour down on the flames and put out the forest fire.

Once the water - and the sleeping potion - were expelled from his body, the Sponge Man was reduced to normal size. The Challs offered peace and asked him to come with them so they might find a cure for him. But the Sponge Man refused.

"A cure? When? Next year? In ten years? Maybe never? And all that time, where will I be... locked up in a laboratory cage... like a guinea pig? No, thanks! I'm a freak! There's no place for me on land!"

With these words, Miklos jumped into the ocean, trading his old life for a new one on the bottom of the sea, surrounded by sponges and marine life. While the Challs would continue searching for a cure, it seemed as if the Sponge Man had finally found peace.
(Challengers Of The Unknown [1st series] #47)

Months later, that peace was disturbed when U.S. military forces began to build an undersea defense system called "Fortess Fish Hook", a dome with aqua-troops, submarines, missile launchers and more. To their assistance, they had America's foremost underwater experts, the Sea Devils.

However, dynamiteers clearing the area for the installation were rather ruthless and destroyed a huge region, killing all sea life in the area... and waking the dormant Sponge Man. Stunned by the blast, the sinister sea thing regained its feet and stared at the carnage about him, including all of his dead "friends". Furiously, the Sponge Man once again started absorbing water into his swelling body, and attacked the engineers, the military forces, and the Sea Devils in a fit of rage.

After a quick battle, the Sponge Man captured the female Sea Devil Judy Watson, but let her go since she somehow, deep in his dim memories, reminded Miklos of the neighbor girl Lisa he had once been in love with. The Sponge Man turned away leaving the Sea Devils behind him.

The Sea Devils had recognized the creature as the Sponge Man that the Challengers had encountered months earlier, and they decided to get their assistance in capturing the creature. The cooperation would not be frictionless, though. The Challs still considered Miklos their friend and would not agree to hurt him. The military and the Sea Devils, on the other hand, had only witnessed the Sponge's destructive side and intended to do whatever was needed to stop the monster. Furthermore, tension grew between the two teams as Judy Walton, girlfriend of the Sea Devils' leader Dane Dorrance, started to show interest in Ace Morgan of the Challengers.

Meanwhile, a meeting was being held in the secret HQ of the notorious criminal organization known to the world as Scorpio. A "foreign power" had paid Scorpio to sabotage "Fortress Fish Hook", but to their luck, the Sponge Man was doing their work for them.

When the Sponge next appeared, attacking an army platform, the Challengers tried to reason with their friend. The creature cried out: "No, you are not my friends! My friends are the fish of the sea! You humans killed them... now I kill you!" With those words he attacked the Challs. The Sea Devils joined the battle, but even the combined might of the two teams was no match for the absorbing abilities of the Sponge. Drained of energy, heat, color and sound, the heroes were almost defeated. Finally, they got lucky as they were able to stun the Sponge with an electrical shock.

The Sponge Man was captured and contained in a plexi-glass cage. The military was satisfied but the Challengers were disturbed. Was there no way they could help Miklos?

Then, fate seemed to intervene. Appearing on the scene was Lisa, Miklos' former neighbor, who claimed she would do anything she could to help him. The Challs brought Lisa to meet Miklos, and as her soothing voice penetrated his warped mind, the never-forgotten love that Miklos had for this girl jogged his memory. He remembered his true self as Lisa told him that the Challengers were his friends. If they could cure Miklos, he and Lisa could be together. Miklos calmed down and agreed to cooperate.

But of course, this was not the end of it. As soon as Miklos and Lisa were left alone, she let him out from his imprisonment, fooling him into believing that the Challs were evil liars, then manipulated him into destroying the military bases once again.

When the Challengers and the Sea Devils learned about the Sponge's escape, they first quarreled about whose fault it was, then started fighting each other, but when June admitted that she had deliberately flirted with Ace to make Dane jealous, both teams calmed down and analyzed the situation. Realizing that Lisa was the only one who could have let Miklos out of his cage, they learned that she was, in fact - a Scorpio agent!

June made amends for her childish flirting games by making Lisa talk. Knowing every female's weakness, she simply threatened Lisa with cutting off all her hair, after which the hard-boiled villainess sang like a canary. Effective torture, if not politically correct.

The heroes then attacked Scorpio's headquarters, defeating most of the criminals, but were nonetheless unable to prevent their launching of a missile filled with poisonous gas, in order to pollute the waters around the military sites. However, the Sponge Man arrived on the scene, grown to gargantuan size after absorbing loads and loads of water. Believing that the missile was aimed at him, Miklos caught it and threw it back on the Scorpio HQ. The Challs and the Sea Devils avoided being crushed by it, but the poisonous gas had started leaking out, threatening the heroes, the villains, and the entire nearby town.

Hesitantingly, the Sponge Man decided to absorb the gas and save the humans, but then, ironically, he started to transform back to human himself. Were he now to absorb the gas, it could kill him when he had fully returned to human, making him face an unbearable dilemma: "Why should I die now... when I can really live again as Miklos?"

But as his common sense returned, Miklos realized that there was no question about how he should act. With the last of his inhuman powers, he absorbed all of the spreading poison. Then, finally completely human again, dived into a water tank to contain it. Miklos found peace in death, knowing that he had done the right thing.

When the press asked the Fortress' Admiral about the event, the military man replied:
"Just say I was wrong about him... and that Miklos died a hero's death."
And Ace Morgan filled in:
"Miklos made up for all the harm he caused... like a sponge, he wiped the slate clean.
(Challengers Of The Unknown [1st series] #51)

As a footnote, Scorpio later returned to fight super-heroes such as the Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and were partly responsible for Celia Forrestal becoming the heroic Skyrocket, to avenge her parents killing at the hands of Scorpio. (Power Company: Skyrocket #1). They would return even later to battle the hero known as Thunderbolt (Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt #2-3, #7-12). Miklos' neighbor Lisa could very well be identical to Scorpia, unit leader of the Scorpio troops.

POWERS:

The Sponge Man had the uncanny ability to absorb virtally anything - liquid, gas, energy (including light, heat, and kinetic energy), and sound - into his body. He would grow in size and strength while doing it, and would also adapt some of the traits of what he absorbed (i.e., absorbing colors would make him colorful, absorbing heat would make him burning hot and his victims freezing cold, etc).

Due to the oxygen he absorbed through his body, the Sponge Man could survive underwater.

APPEARANCES:

  • Challengers Of The Unknown [1st series] #47 (Dec 1965-Jan 1966)
    "The Sinister Sponge"
  • Challengers Of The Unknown [1st series] #51 (Aug-Sep 1966)
    "Smash the Sponge Man... or Die"

More to come...

/ola



Hellst0ne
Member
posted March 20, 2003 01:32 PM

THE CRIMSON METEOR
Created by Danny Fingeroth and Bob McLeod

PERSONAL DATA:

Alter Ego: Willie Schuman
Occupation: Cartoonist
Known Relatives: Cloris Danes Schuman (wife, deceased)
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Metropolis, formerly Seattle
Height: N/A
Weight: N/A
Eyes: Brown
Hair: White, formerly brown
Skin: White

First appearance: Superman 80-Page Giant #1 (Feb 1999)

HISTORY:

In the 1940s, Willie Schuman worked for the Seattle News as a staff artist, mostly drawing political cartoons and courtroom sketches, winning a few awards on the road. Then he ghosted a bunch of strips for other cartoonists and later did one under a pen name for years. He also earned some money painting portraits of one of the minor super-heroes of the 1940s, the Crimson Meteor.

In his old age, Willie moved to Metropolis and sold his new strip "Captain Tomorrow" to a syndicate, finally getting to sign his own name to a strip.

When Clark Kent a.k.a. Superman first read the "Captain Tomorrow" strip in the Daily Planet, he was shocked to see the similarities between the main character and himself. The super-hero Captain Tomorrow was secretly the mellow Bill Trent, newspaper artist for the Daily Criterion in Cosmopolis. He even had a sweetheart named Clorid Dane, and fought several villains reminiscent of Superman's foes. Too close to be a coincidence.

Furthermore, some people, particularly children, started to confuse Superman with the fictional Captain Tomorrow. Disturbed, Clark Kent visited Schuman in an attempt to get an interview with the artist, but was met with utter suspicion. When Clark asked about from where Schuman got his inspiration or whether he had any agenda beyond entertainment, Schuman snapped:

"For all I know, you're the one with a hidden agenda. Maybe you want to steal my ideas and do a strip of your own, or sell movie rights to something I've created. Wouldn't be the first time it happened to me." Then Schuman asked Clark to leave.

It was not until Clark revisited Schuman as Superman, that he learned the truth. Delighted to meet one of his idols, Schuman told Superman his life story. In the 1940s, Willie was subjected to the radiation of a strange meteor and gained super-powers. As the heroic Crimson Meteor of Seattle he did not get as much publicity as the "Eastern guys" got, but his feats were admirable and his powers made him a Superman of that era. His powers, though, started to fade pretty soon after he got them, and in his old age, they were long gone.

Upon the death of his wife Cloris, Schuman moved to Metropolis and created the "Captain Tomorrow" strip, based on his life as a hero, his former secret identity and powers, mixed with some sci-fi elements and, he admitted, "some of the modern exploits of Superman himself. Hope you don't mind."

Although still amazed by the similarities between their lives, Superman was calmed by Schuman's story and did not mind. He then granted Schuman a favor. It had been decades since Schuman had last flown, but grabbing Superman's hand as he took off for the skies, Schuman experienced that feeling one more time. Helping Schuman "fly like an eagle" once again made Superman feel like a great hero. Maybe even as great as Captain Tomorrow.

POWERS:

In his prime, the Crimson Meteor could juggle pianos, fly like an eagle, and laugh if some goon hit him with a lead pipe. He could see things a mile away and hear a baby cry in the next country.

APPEARANCES:

  • Superman 80-Page Giant #1 (Feb 1999) "Too Close To Home"


Hellst0ne
Member
posted March 20, 2003 01:34 PM

And one of my favorites...


THE FLY-CATCHER
Created by Steve Skeates and Berni Wrightson

PERSONAL DATA:

Alter Ego: Vernon Glute, a.k.a. "the Gourmet"
Occupation: Fly-catcher, former millionaire
Known Relatives: None
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Sleez-Zee Diner, in a poorer part of an unnamed U.S. city
Height: N/A
Weight: N/A
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Black, balding
Skin: White

First appearance: Plop! #1 (September-October 1973)

HISTORY:

The story as related by Cain of the Dreaming:

Vernon Glute was a millionaire with no concern for his fellow man. Words as "fat", "gross", and "a slob" would easily apply to him, although he considered himself a gourmet. All of his money was spent on eating, exotic dishes, an excellent kitchen and elegant dining falilcities. Stories are still told of how Vernon Glute spent millions to obtain exotic fruits from faraway lands, of how these fruits would be soaked for years and years in expensive brandies and liqueurs, before they would finally reach the table of the master gourmet, to be savored and consumed.

Yet not even these fruits could compare with Vernon Glute's favorite delicacy - frogs' legs. Mounds and mounds of frogs' legs. Never growing tired of this food, Vernon Glute demanded that the frogs' legs be as fresh as possible. The frogs were to be slaughtered right in his own kitchen.

Sitting down to eat perhaps the 300th batch of frogs' legs he had had that year, Glute was utterly shocked upon discovering that they were under-cooked. Angered, he called for his humble cook and butler Hormsley. When Hormsley suggested he would cook them some more, Glute furiously threw the plate away and demanded a new batch full of newly killed, freshly cooked frogs' legs.

The clock ticked as Vernon Glute impatiently waited and waited for Hormsley to return from the kitchen. But for some reason, that never happened. Finally, Glute's curiousity got the better of him. Lifting his bulk and standing up from the dining table, something he seldom did and therefore quite a task, Glute made an attempt to go out into the kitchen himself and find out the reason for the delay.

But no sooner had he risen than he heard strange sounds, a squaking, as from old wheels, and Hormsley's horrified shouting:

"No! Stay away!... Please! I didn't mean to! I was only doing as I was told! I..."

Then, a blood-chilling scream.

Vernon Glute froze with fear, as the sounds started to appear from everywhere around him, from behind each and every door, growing louder and louder until it became an unbearable symphony. Things began to thud at the doors. Millions of small objects were hitting the doors again and again, causing the woods to splinter. The doors gave away and the terrified Vernon caught a glimpse of what was coming to him.

Frogs. Hundreds, thousands, millions of frogs. Legless frogs, walking with crutches and rolling on squeaking wheels, leaping upon him, croaking for revenge...

Vernon Glute was never heard from again. Years passed, and the stories about him became legend.

Years later, an incident was reported from a sleazy diner in a poorer part of town. The joint had some vermin problems, with summer flies flying and buzzing everywhere. Annoyed, one of the cooks whistled for "the Fly-Catcher". Into the restaurant rolled a fat, slobby, well-dressed but legless man on four squeaking wheels. He surveyed the scene, his eyes riveting on one of the flies. Then, a frog's tongue propelled out from his mouth and caught the fly. The Fly-Cather swallowed his prey, then wiped the corner of his mouth with a linen napkin. Two young costumers fled the diner in disgust.

Vernon Glute's fate was ironic. The man who had once savored only the best of foods was now transformed into a half-human creature, cursed for the rest of his miserable life to dine on the most common of insects.

APPEARANCES:

  • Plop! #1 (September-October 1973) "The Gourmet"
  • Reprinted in DC Millennium Edition: Plop! #1 (July 2000)


Hellst0ne
Member
posted March 22, 2003 04:15 AM

Hi again.

Just want to point out that one of the really obscure characters from Round II -- DC's own "Popeye", Captain Strong -- makes a brief appearance in this week's GREEN ARROW #22.

/ola



Dr. Midnight 32
Member
posted March 22, 2003 12:56 PM

THE FORGOTTEN HEROES

All of the following text is taken from Adam Arnold's wonderful 'Unofficial Forgotten Heroes' page.

ACTION COMICS #536
Wolfman, Kupperberg, Staton
"Battle Beneath The Earth!"

The Omega Men must rescue a powerless Superman from the center of the Earth. To accomplish this, they enlist Lois Lane to find someone who can help. That person is the now reclusive Cave Carson, who at first refuses because he gave up the adventure business to get away from the madness. But after Lois Lane has an outburst, Cave Carson agrees to lend his assistance in the matter.
536.10.1-536.10.4 - Cave Carson, "Like I said, my friends and I came across this city by accident. But after we all... drifted apart, I went through a series of assistants-- --one of whom ran off with an earlier model of the Mighty Mole, as well as charts of some of our subterranean explorations. That's when I started learning I couldn't trust anyone."
Lois Lane, "There's more to it than that, isn't there, Cave? One bad apple couldn't be enough to drive you away from all mankind."
Cave Carson, "Yeah.. There's more. But it's none of your business, Lane. It concerns nobody. Look, I agreed to help you-- --so save your questions! Just don't badger me!"
'Silence fills the cabin of the Mighty Mole as those within peer uncomfortably ahead into the gloom. They feel sorrow for this embittered man-- --but there is little they can do for him.'
The group soon save Superman after a big scuffle, and the heroes part ways, with Cave Carson wishing to be left alone.

ACTION COMICS #540
Wolfman, Kane
"World Enough and Time"

540.11.2 - 'Later, at the offices of The Daily Planet'
Lois Lane, "Okay, Perry, I worked up this story on forgotten super-heroes, But I still think it's taking advantage of Superman's problems."
Perry White, "You worry about writing the stories, Lois! I'll worry about what's fair!"
540.11.3 - Lois, "okay, okay. Take it easy! Look, I checked up on a whole slew of once-famous heroes..."
Clark enters and says, "Er-- Perry, can I speak to you? It's rather urgent! I'm still not all that well..."
540.11.4 - Lois, "We have Cave Carson, of course, and then the Sea Devils, you might remember them..."
Clark, "...and frankly, I think it might be a good idea to get away for awhile... to relax ..take it easy."
540.11.5 - Lois, "There was also the Suicide Squad, and a western hero called The Vigilante. There was Ragman... ...of course there was Rip Hunter, the Time Master, and something called Bwana Beast, and..."
Clark, "I thought I'd go to Europe or someplace like that..."
Perry, "Hold it! Hold it! HOLD IT!"
540.12.1 - Perry, "Lois, just do your story! Kent, you've got a vaca-? Kent?! Great Caesar's ghost! He's gone!"
540.12.2-540.12.4 - 'And streaking across Metropolis...'
Superman, "Lois' story may have provided the single hope I've been searching for! Satanis magically sabotaged every time-travel method I knew about-- --but I'd never heard of this Rip Hunter till Lois mentioned it. And if he's everything my x-ray vision scanned from Lois' notes, then I may have found my entry back into the past! How frustrating not possessing my super-speed. In the past, I'd be in California within a nano-second. Now it will take more than an hour! Please, Rao, save my other half till I can make it to his side! Perhaps together we'll figure a way to combine once again!"
540.12.5 - 'Time slowly crawls on. But finally...'
Superman finally arrives over a mountain with a lab located just below it's summit, "Lois' notes are accurate... there's a lab in these northern California mountains. And my x-ray vision shows it belongs to Rip Hunter! Now if he can help--"
540.13.1 - 'But...'
Superman arrives through the roof of the lab to find the severely aged group of time masters, "Great Krypton! You're so--"
Rip Hunter, "Old? We know that, Superman. Why do you think we came here to be alone? What do you want of us?"
Bonnie Baxter, "Rip, maybe Superman can help us?"
Rip Hunter, "That's not why he came, Bonnie-- is it, Superman?"
540.13.2 - Superman, "No, it isn't. But maybe I can help. What happened to you?"
Rip Hunter, "Time simply caught up with us! And no you can't help! Don't even try! Now what do you want?"
540.13.3-540.13.4 - Superman thinks, 'Strange. He's the second recluse hero I've recently met*! Wonder if there's a connection?' [* Cave Carson in ACTION #586 - Julie]
Superman, "Uhhh, I almost feel guilty asking you, Dr. Hunter, but I need your help. My life is at stake!"
540.16.5 - Superman appears in the time sphere yelling, "You're wrong, Satanis! I am here! And I'm ready to fight-- --if need be, to the finish!"

ACTION COMICS #541
Wolfman, Kane
"Once Again -- Superman"

The time sphere disappears, leaving Superman in the past to battle his other self and Satanis. Meanwhile in the present, Lois Lane is in the middle of rewriting her forgotten super-heroes story.

ACTION COMICS #545
Wolfman, Kane
"...With But a Single Step!"

545.21.1 - 'Evening streaks the Grand Canyon in ribbons of gold and scarlet. Here, away from any city, away from civilization, man and nature become one... ...excepting, of course, when man has corrupted what God has wrought...'
545.21.2 - Inside the lab Rip Hunter, Bonnie Baxter, and Jeff Smith are discussing the matter at hand. Bonnie asks, "What do you think, Rip?"
Rip replies, "I wish I knew... everything's going so poorly. I hate it. Here I am-- Rip Hunter --the Time Master, they called me-- --and right now time is my worst enemy!"
545.21.3 - "Rip, the helicopter's landing! They're coming!"
545.21.4 - Rip Hunter greets the two arrivals, "Cave Carson, is that you? I hardly recognize you."
Cave replies, "Yeah, Hunter. It's me... and this is Dane Dorrance of the Sea Devils."
545.21.5 - Rip, "What about Rick Flagg, Dolphin-- and all the others?"
Cave, "Don't let your pants itch, Hunter. They'll be here soon enough."
545.21.6 - Rip, "I hope so, Carson. To the world at large we're all the Forgotten Heroes-- --but now only we can save the world!!"
'Rip Hunter's words may be true enough, but not for the reasons he expects...'

ACTION COMICS #552
Wolfman, Kane
"Another Time! Another Death!"

Vandal Savage has unleashed a series of prehistoric roots that have ravaged Suicide Slum, but the timely intervention of Superman has averted the loss of life. Meanwhile a meeting is getting underway 'Somewhere on the western coast of the United States...'
552.4.1-552.4.6 - "I certainly don't mind a free vacation, but I'd like to know why I've been invited."
Rip Hunter, "I agree. And I'd say it's about time we all learned the truth."
Dolphin, "Feel so... strange here. So... far from the... water. Will... Dolphin... be here... long?"
Cave Carson, "Afraid so, lady. Y'see, the fate of the world rests in our hands! A world I wanted to forsake!"
Rip Hunter, "We've all accepted our tragedies in different ways, Cave. But I agree. It's about time to level with our newfound friends."
Animal Man, "What I wanna know is-- how'd you know about me bein' Animal Man? I thought nobody knew. I mean, I recognize a couple of you-- Cave Carson, America's numero uno geologist. Even Rip Hunter, the famous time-master -- although I thought you were younger. But some of you-- sorry if I offend ya-- but you mean nothin' to me."
552.5.1-552.5.4 - Rip Hunter, "You're right about me being younger, Animal Man I am! Which is a part of the reason you're all here. But frankly, I don't know all of you either. Only one man does-- --the one who brought us all here. But he's asked that you meet him later for reasons which shall then become clear. When Cave's done you'll see a connection."
Cave Carson, "You done, Hunter? Let me get on with it. Animal Man's right... I'm a geologist. And to make my work easier, I created a little machine called the Mighty Mole."
552.5.5-552.15.2 - Cave Carson relays a story of how he came across a temple filled with treasure but soon found himself before a government grand jury because he was on government property. Thus, he had to give all the maps and treasure back to the government and then dropped out of sight.
Next, Dane Dorrance of the Sea Devils relates a similar story of discovering a golden temple under the sea and then being taken in by the government.
Rick Flagg of the top secret government group the Suicide Squad relates an even similar story to Cave Carson's. Two days later the Suicide Squad was disbanded.
Animal Man and Congo Bill, who exchanges minds with the golden gorilla named Congorilla, both relate stories of discovering the temple in the jungles of the world and finding their passports revoked when they were caught by the government.
Dolphin tells her side of the story as she sees the temple beneath the waves, but she hides when she sees the Sea Devils coming. But, soon she is captured by the government and taken aboard their ship where she manages to escape back to the sea.
Lastly, Rip Hunter relates the story of his group traveling to the dawn of time to discover the truth of it all. The journey was going fine until they mysteriously came across the temple floating in the rainbow of energy waves of the time stream. The temple started emiting a high-pitched sound and the group was rendered unconscious. They somehow made it back to the present, aged beyond their years.
554.15.3-554.15.5 - Rip Hunter, "We had left the present time no older than thirty-five! Even young Corky, only nineteen, was now eighty!"
Congo Bill, "I see connections, but I still don't understand."
Animal Man, "Yeah, and how did you know about me?"
Rick Flagg, "There are still many questions left unanswered."
Rip Hunter, "Don't worry, Mr. Flagg. You'll get your answers soon enough. In fact, I think it's time you met the man who asked us all to come here. He may be the only one who can help my friends and me become young again... ...who can solve your particular problems-- --as well as save the world from being destroyed by its greatest hero! Here's the man who lead us into a battle against Superman! And heaven help the Earth if we fail at our task!"
Meanwhile in Metropolis, Superman is facing a prehistoric jungle in a protective barrier that seems to be expanding.
554.23.1-554.23.6 - 'Meanwhile...'
A man enters the room and explains, "I'm pleased that you all could make it. Let me introduce myself. My formal name no longer has any meaning-- --but you can call me Immortal Man! I've brought you here because, in your own right, you have all been heroes. You are needed to battle a danger that even now is striking the city of Metropolis."
Rick Flagg questions, "Metropolis? That's Superman's turf. What are we needed for?"
Immortal Man continues, "Mr. Flagg, Superman is the cause of the disaster striking Metropolis. Indeed, the only way we can defeat the menace is to kill Earth's Greatest Hero!"

ACTION COMICS #555
Wolfman, Kane
"The World At Time's End!"

Vandal Savage is briefing his scientist at Abraxas, Inc. as Superman unknowingly spreads prehistoric spores throughout Metropolis park. A scientist reveals that "We did not build the time pyramids. We can't even guess who did... ...or what their actual purpose might be. We can only tap their power and use it as you have commanded."
555.2.1-555.5.6 - Meanwhile, the meeting that was called by the Immortal Man continues as the Immortal Man tells a prehistoric tale of how Vandal Adg and the Immortal Man faced off for the first time... but "fate, in the form of some mysterious fireball, intervened." The radiation from the fireball made Vandar Adg immortal, and the Immortal Man found a jewel within the fireball which he took with him as an ornament, which has made him immortal. Over time, the two became immortal enemies as Vandar Adg became Vandal Savage and became a king in Ancient Summer, built pyramids in Egypt, and ravaged cities as Genghis Khan.
The Immortal Man goes on to explain that he has learned Vandal Savage infected Superman with a "time-seed which will turn the Earth into a prehistoric nightmare! If this growth is allowed to flourish, it will, quite frankly, mean the end of everything! I tried contacting the Justice League but was unable to. I needed people working with me... people who had abilities of their own. All of you Forgotten Heroes fit that category. I need you. The world needs you. One way to another, we've got to stop Superman before he destroys everything we hold dear. Are you with me?"
And with that the group of men and women 'as one all chime in agreement!'
555.6.1-555.10.3 - Superman tried to prevent the spreading of the jungle without avail, and the mayor is giving a press conference on the situation. Suddenly, Vandal Savage appears and feeds the press what they want to hear concerning the prehistoric jungle and how it was meant to help mankind, but Superman has ruined it.
555.10.4 - The Forgotten Heroes watch the news cast as Vandal Savage says, "I am sorry, but I... I tried to help."
Animal Man comments, "That crummy liar! He's got them eating out of his hand."
Immortal Man replies, "Now you understand the urgency, Animal Man!"
555.11.1-555.11.3 - Congo Bill, "Trouble is, Superman can't set the record straight!"
Immortal Man, "Not until after he does what we told him to do. Still, Superman doesn't need defending, he needs our help. We've got to destroy the pyramids!"
Animal Man, "Yeah, I know. How'd a jerk like Savage build them anyway?"
Immortal Man, "He didn't, Animal Man... but that is a problem for another time. Now, you all have special abilities-- here is how you will use them."
555.11.4-555.11.5 - 'Meanwhile, ninety million miles from Earth...'
Superman thinks, "I still don't want to believe it, but my microscopic vision confirmed what the Immortal Man 'told' me! I am the one who spread those time spores... ...and the only way to remove them is to burn them off in the heat of our sun! ...assuming they can be burned away!"
555.12.1-555.17.6 - In the Bahamas, Dane Dorrance and Dolphin make their way to the golden pyramid beneath the sea, but not without some easily put-down government resistance.
In Africa, Congo Bill makes a quick mind-switch with Congorillia and storms the pyramid to find it is extremely advanced.
In Cambodia, Rick Flagg faces off against a prehistoric beast before he storms the main complex.
In Brazil, Animal Man tries to find out how Vandal Savage is tapping into the pyramids, but he is stopped by a bunch of guards and must flee.
In Metropolis, Superman cages a series of prehistoric beasts before he is contacted by the Immortal Man telepathically. Superman is instructed to meet him at their headquarters.
555.18.1-555.18.6 - 'Shortly...'
Superman, "You're kidding?"
Immortal Man, "No, Superman, I assure you I am not!"
Superman, "But even Vandal Savage hasn't the ability to harness the energy of the Big Bang which created the universe!"
Immortal Man, "He didn't build the pyramids. He is merely utilizing them for his own needs. If we're to stop the prehistoric plague, we must destroy the pyramid that is at the beginning of time."
Superman, "Then I'll do it!"
Rip Hunter, "We're coming with you, Superman! That pyramid turned my partners and me old! If there is a way to reverse it-- --we have to try!"
Superman, "Dr. Hunter... What if it ages you further?"
Rip Hunter, "That's a risk we've all agreed to take!"
'Rip Hunter, Jeff Smith, Bonnie and Corky Baxter, lead Superman to the time sphere... The five of them will journey to the beginning of time... ...to the creation of the universe itself!"
555.19.1-555.19.2 - The passengers begin to experience the ringing again as Superman comments, "Something wrong, Dr. Hunter?"
Rip Hunter, "Just scared, Superman. This is where we lost consciousness the last time. There was light, tremendous pressure, then-- N-NO! It's starting now! Starting all over again-!"
Superman, "They're unconscious. That means it's up to me!"
555.19.3-555.19.6 - Superman exits the time sphere and flies off to the energy mass, "The time pyramid is somewhere in that blinding light. Problem is, can I reach it? The force is tremendous... ...the pressure terrible! This is the moment... the birth of everything! I can't look-- I mustn't look! The light could even blind me! And the gravity... it's increasing! All gravity's centered right here... ...right at this spot... right at this moment!"
555.20.1-555.20.5 - Superman suddenly sees the pyramid and flies to it, "Have to guide myself through instinct... push my way through the pressures. I... I just don't know if I can... the pain is... increasing. Increasing faster than I expected! God! Feel the impassible energy. The terrible force! And I... sense tranquility inside here... the calm in the eye of the hurricane. Got to break through... no matter the pain... no matter the agony... I'VE GOT TO BREAK THROUGH!"
'The Man of Steel screams as barrier after barrier gives way. As machinery built in another time and place pulses with energy all around him... Then... SKRAA-BOOOOMMM!!'
555.21.1-555.21.3 - 'Time--the present:'
Vandal Savage is screaming at the current situation involving his machine, "Cruise-- What is happening? Explain!"
Cruise, "Sire, there is power-feedback the likes of which I've never seen! More powerful than any nuclear bomb known on Earth!"
Savage, "Do something!"
Cruise, "Sir... I-- I cannot. The pyramids... look at the machines... The pyramids no longer exist!"
555.21.4 - 'The Rocky Mountains:'
The time sphere reappears as Congo Bill comments, "What? The time sphere's returned? Did they fail?"
Animal Man replies, "Congo Billy-boy, I like a positive attitude!"
555.21.5 - Animal Man opens the hatch and yells, "Hurry, help me get them out!"
555.21.6 - Inside, the disoriented time masters regain their bearings as Animal Man comments happily, "Well, I'll be-- Look at them! All of you! I-- I don't know what happened back there-- but Rip Hunter and his friends-- --are young again!"
555.22.1-555.22.4 - Congo Bill, "They've succeeded! Look here! The prehistoric jungle is vanishing! Whatever power kept it alive is gone!"
Dolphin, "What... about Superman? Where... is he?"
Congo Bill, "Superman--?! Great guns! He didn't return with Rip Hunter!"
Immortal Man, "Superman was subjected to the Big Bang! As powerful as he is... ...I-- I doubt that even he could have survived! My friends, we saved Metropolis... but at what cost! We destroyed Superman!"
555.22.5-555.23 - 'The Pentagon:'
The General is giving his report on the matter, "They're all gone-- just like that! One moment the pyramids were here... ...the next they've vanished! [picture of world map on screen] I've checked with the other nations that harbored pyramids similar to ours and they've all reported the same findings! All we knew was the pyramids had been placed on our planet during the time of the cavemen. Their purpose is unknown. Their power incredible. [picture of pyramid on screen] Yet, these people somehow destroyed them before we could learn their purpose. [picture of Forgotten Heroes faces on screen] Because of the alien nature of the pyramids, we did not reveal their existence. Now that they've been destroyed, the president has asked that we all forget they ever existed at all. [picture of Superman on screen] My friends... whatever they were here for is a secret we shall never know!"

ACTION COMICS #554
Wolfman, Kane
"If Superman Didn't Exist..."

554.7.1-554.7.6 - 'Millennia later, the pyramids were discovered and their energies tapped by the immortal villain known as Vandal Savage... To stop Savage, Superman joined with famed Time Master, Rip Hunter, and traveled back to the moment the universe was formed... There, at the dawn of creation the Man of Steel discovered the central pyramid which powered all the others... And using his incredible powers, he destroyed it... ...unknowingly triggering a wave of energy which rippled throughout all time... ...and changed our world seemingly beyond repair... Superman vanished and all he represented disappeared with him... The Justice League was no more. The Titans were never born. No warrior in any age ever raised a sword in battle... There was no mythology. There were no heroes. There were no wars..."

DC COMICS PRESENTS #77
Wolfman, Swan, Hunt
"Triad of Terror!"

A luncheon ceremony in Metropolis between the press and the Forgotten Heroes is suddenly crashed by Ultivac and Mr. Poseidon. The Forgotten Heroes quickly spring into action but they are unable to defeat the metallic machine and it's cohort. Across town, Superman has a run in with Atom-Master and his pets as they manage to rob the Midtown Bank and vanish. Superman manages to track him down, only to discover a secret meeting between Ultivac, Enchantress, Kraklow, and Atom-Master who all vanish when Superman breaks up the meeting.
Soon, Superman asks the Forgotten Heroes for help and they travel in Rip Hunter's time sphere to the Middle Ages. En route, Superman is turned into a dragon by Kraklow's magic, but Animal Man quickly brings down the dragon by using it's powers against it. The team plan a strategy for how to storm Kraklow's castle. They soon split into two teams: Rip Hunter, Cave Carson, Rick Flagg, Immortal Man, and Congorillia burrow underground in the Mighty Mole, while Animal Man, Dane Dorrance, and Dolphin swim the lake surrounding the castle so they can storm the front door. The dragon crashes in through the ceiling and Superman returns to normal, but Kraklow vanishes along with his castle leaving the Forgotten Heroes to face the Faceless Hunter from Saturn.

DC COMICS PRESENTS #78
Woldman, Swan, Hunt
"The Triad"

The Faceless Hunter from Saturn lifts a rock and hurtles it at the group of heroes, and Superman quickly uses his heat vision to shatter it. But, the debris hits the Immortal Man... killing him. The heroes then go on a full-out assault on the creature which ends with Superman forcing the creature to reveal why he joined the enemy team and where he can find them hiding at. Suddenly, a reincarnated Immortal Man appears on the scene in the body of a strapping youth and the team then heads into space with Superman's help.
En route to the Sorcerer's World they must take a rest and seek aid on the water world of Qaria due to the current course being through a red sun system. Soon, the Space Cabby arrives on the scene to take the heroes further on their journey. But, the combined will of the Enchantress and Kraklow bring the cab down on an mysterious world where they are soon rescued by the crew of The Pioneer: Chris KL-99, Jero, and Halk.
The bizarre gathering of heroes soon come across the planet Yggardis, which is no mere planet, but a living, thinking organism. The ship is attacked and brought down to the planet as Superman is dragged far below the surface. The Forgotten Heroes soon find Superman and escape from the planet aboard The Pioneer at full speed. Realizing the entire planet is the third Sorcerer, they activate full lasers and disorient the planet long enough for the triad of sorcerers' link to be broken. The Enchantress' monsters turn against her, her plans crumble, and thus she vanishes leaving a brief ripple-effect shuddering throughout the universe.
On Earth, the heroes bid their goodbyes to the The Pioneer and its' crew and vibrate back to the Middle Ages so they can reclaim the Mighty Mole and the time sphere. They briefly ponder the events and then head back to the present. Meanwhile on a small satellite orbiting the Earth, the Monitor and Lyla try to locate Kraklow and the Enchantress without avail. But, Lyla detects the energies forming, and the Monitor instructs Lyla to cancel all frequencies to Earth's criminal population because they have all been tested for their strengths and weakness and no longer need to provide council to them. The Monitor's true purpose has begun and he sets his scanners on Earth-Three, for it is feared that it is where the trouble will begin.

WHO'S WHO (1985-1986) #8

Forgotten Heroes - Members:

  • Animal Man
  • Cave Carson
  • Congo Bill
  • Dane Dorrance
  • Dolphin
  • Immortal Man
  • Rick Flagg
  • Rip Hunter

History: Animal Man, who could assume the powers of any living beast; Cave Carson, the internationally known geologist; Congo Bill, the world-famous explorer and naturalist; Dane Dorrance, leader of the aquatic adventurers called the Sea Devils; Dolphin, mysterious underwater beauty; Rick Flagg, leader of the top-secret military team know as the Suicide Squad; and Rip Hunter, the legendary Time-Master. They were all once-prominent heroes who had stumbled across identical ancient golden pyramids at various points around and inside the Earth, only to find themselves censured when they reported their finds to the U.S. Government. Their careers for the most part ruined, with nowhere else to turn, they all responded to a summons by the mysterious figure known only as the Immortal Man, who explained to them that the pyramids were part of a plan by his ages-old foe, the equally immortal Vandal Savage, to destroy Superman and conquer the world.
Under Immortal Man's direction, and with Superman's eventual aid, these forgotten heroes managed to destroy the pyramids and save the world. At Immortal Man's suggestion, the group decides to band together formally to protect the world against menaces only their unique skills could hope to defeat. To this end, they have already faced an organization of forgotten villains who were attempting to form a supernatural coalition that would dominate the Earth.
First appearance: Action Comics #552

CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS #11
Wolfman, Pérez, Ordway
"Aftershocks"

Throughout the 'Crisis', the Forgotten Heroes were all fighting on their own: The Sea Devils [CRISIS #5], Dolphin [CRISIS #10-12], Congo Bill [CRISIS #12], Cave Carson [CRISIS #11-12], Rip Hunter [CRISIS #5,10-12]. But it wasn't until after the universes had merged, after the dramatic battle between the super-heroes and the Anti-Monitor at the beginning of time, that some of the team banded together again.
11.9.6-11.9.8 - Animal-Man, Dolphin, Rip Hunter and non-members Captain Comet, Adam Strange, and Atomic Knight journey in the time sphere to aftermath of the second front of the battle only to discover Brainiac's skull ship. They board it in hopes of discovering the power they need to finally defeat the Anti-Monitor.

CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS #12
Wolfman, Pérez, Ordway
"Final Crisis"

12.1.1-12.3.11 - The three Forgotten Heroes and three tag-alongs search the ship for a power-source and they learn the monitors were focused on the Earth, but for some reason it is gone. Suddenly, Brainiac awakens and the heroes must reason with the machine for help in finding a power supply significant enough to stopping the Anti-Monitor. Brainiac researches the topic and they soon begin a star-trek to find the ultimate power supply.
12.9.6 - The Immortal Man dies as a civilian casualty.
12.14.1-12.14.6 - Brainiac takes the team to Apokolips where they encounter Darkseid the destroyer.
12.33.5-12.33.8 - Darkseid and the others peer into the anti-matter universe through Alex Luthor's eyes.
12.35.5-12.35.9 - Darkseid uses Alex Luthor to unleash a scorching blast of pure Darkseidian wrath upon the Anti-Monitor.
12.36.1-12.36.4 - The heroes give their thanks to Darkseid, which he rejects by giving a grime warning of "When, next we meet, it shall be as enemies."

WHO'S WHO UPDATE '87 #5

Appendix: Forgotten Heroes -
In the recreated DC Universe, Rip Hunter was not a member of the Forgotten Heroes since he had not yet made his first time trip when their group was formed.



Dr. Midnight 32
Member
posted March 22, 2003 12:57 PM

THE FORGOTTEN HEROES (post-Crisis)

Again, all of this is from Adam Arnold's wonderful 'Unofficial Forgotten Heroes' site.

RESURRECTION MAN #24
Abnett, Lanning, Guice
"Forgotten But Not Gone"

The mysterious Forgotten Heroes gather together to join Mitch, who they believe to be the missing Immortal Man. But can the likes of the Ray, Animal Man, Ballistic, Cave Carson, and the sorcerous Fetish save Mitch from a mad yuppie with a powerful exoskeleton - especially when the skeleton in question is that of Mitch's greatest foe: Hooker! You know things must be bad when even the villainous Body Doubles come to the good guy's side! Plus, how is Mitch's feud with Vandal Savage (as seen in DC ONE MILLION) connected to these strange goings-on?

RESURRECTION MAN #25
Abnett, Lanning, Guice, Ryan
"Millennium Then"

Mitch discovers more about his origins in a guest-packed twenty-fifth issue! In Part 1 of the 3-part "Millennium Meteor", Mitch escapes The Lab with the help of his new friends, the Forgotten Heroes (among them the Ray, Animal Man, Vigilante, and Cave Carson) who belive him to be their long-lost leader, the Immortal Man. Is Mitch the man they have been looking for? And what does the Immortal Man's greatest foe - Vandal Savage - plan to do if he is?

RESURRECTION MAN #26
Abnett, Lanning, Williams
"Millennium Now!"

Superman, the Titans, Green Lantern, Young Justice, and Wonder Woman guest-star in Part 2 of the 3-Part "Millennium Meteor". Only Mitch - and his new pals, the Forgotten Heroes - stand between Vandal Savage and what the immortal villain believes to be a piece of the meteor which gave him his powers millennia ago. But when the meteor hits, out comes the Warpchild, a being of seemingly infinite power that quickly makes waste of Savage's goons, along with some of the Forgotten Heroes! Can Mitch succeed against this mysterious being where some of DC's most powerful heroes have failed?

RESURRECTION MAN #27
Abnett, Lanning, Guice
"The Ends of The Earth"

A guest-star packed final issue concludes the 3-part "Millennium Meteor". As Earth's mightiest heroes (Superman, Wonder Woman, and members of the Titans and Young Justice) fall before the reality-altering power of the Warpchild, it's up to Mitch Shelley, Vandal Savage, and the Immortal Man to track down the monster. Can they succeed where the others have failed? More important, can these immortal enemies work together long enough to defeat a common foe?

SUPERMAN: THE MAN OF STEEL #120 (January 2002)
"What Lies Beneath"
Schultz, Guichet, Vines

Calvin "Cave" Carson, the world-renowned geologist and inner Earth explorer has dropped by the Daily Planet to talk to Clark Kent about a rather large story he has been involved in. Clark asks Cave to cut to the chase and give him some background information.
120.5.5 - Flashback of the recent Forgotten Heroes team in battle as Cave relays his story, "I've been exploring the mysteries of the subterranean world ever since I was a young man, Mr. Kent... Long before this whole metahuman explosion. The hidden wonders of the Earth have always obsessed me. Several years back-- down there-- I stumbled on the immortal Vandal Savage's conspiracy of world domination... ...and helped form the Forgotten Heroes, a clandestine company of warriors dedicated to ending Savage's threat."
120.6.1 - We see Cave and Fetish going over some documents. "As it turned out, I also wound up as the Heroes' chief financer. A couple of years of this and then one day I woke up to find the coffers empty, and the banks banging at my door."
120.6.2-120.6.5 - "I'm not proud of this, Mr. Kent, but to escape my many creditors, I did as I've always done when confronted with personal crisis... ...I fled into the bosom of mother Earth. For two years I chose exile over financial responsibility, and wandered the fiery depths of the globe, stumbling on countless underworld glories. Eventually my iron steed-- The Mighty Mole --failed me. Such a sophisticated piece of equipment requires expensive maintenance. I continued on foot until I came across traces of an alien tech I later learned was the legacy of Brainiac 13... ...and I became aware that a great war was being fought on the surface. I followed the tendrils back toward the surface. I was too late for the war... ...but I met my future on the way up-- in the shape of one Talia Head, chief executive officer of Lexcorp!"



Enda80
Member
posted March 23, 2003 10:51 AM

Originally posted by MrMGL:


Were there any other Jack the Ripper appearances/connections/references in the DCU???

Originally posted by IAmHungry:


Could Redjack be a Star Trek reference to that entity that killed women and then framed Scotty for the murders?

Yup, in an episode written by Robert Bloch. Redjack also appeared in a few DC STAR TREK issues.

Pre-Crisis, the ghost of Jack the Ripper turned up in an issue of LOIS LANE. I will have to do some digging to get the exact reference.

Check out http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix's entry on Zaniac for their references to Jack the Ripper.



Hellst0ne
Member
posted March 23, 2003 11:37 AM

Years ago, HELLBLAZER had a story involving demonic activities, the Royal Family of England, and Jack the Ripper. And it would be DCU since it was pre-Vertigo, I believe.

A quite recent issue of SUPERGIRL (sometime around, #55-60, I think, Dr. Fate was on the cover and it was about the history of Buzz) stated - true or not - that the demon Buzz inspired the Ripper (who was in fact the boyfriend of the last girl murdered, can't remember his name right now) to commit the Whitechapel Murders.

Also - the villain Red Jack from Morrison's DOOM PATROL claimed that he was God and Jack the Ripper (and others) in one.

/ola



The Vigilante
Member
posted March 23, 2003 11:01 PM

I've got a Dingbats of Danger Street web page done (why, yes, I did have a lot of free time that week, thank you kindly), but I haven't gotten around to transferring the info to the list. Will do that this week sometime.

Also, have an I-Spy page done, but I don't think I have enough info on King Faraday's appearances outside that or the DANGER TRAIL limited series to really post it here.



The Vigilante
Member
posted March 24, 2003 02:13 AM

THE DINGBATS OF DANGER STREET

The Dingbats of Danger Street were basically just a colorful street gang, much in the same vein as many other Kirby (and Kirby/Simon) creations like the Kid Cowboys of Boys' Ranch, the Newsboy Legion, and the Boy Commandos. There were four young lads who made up the Dingbats:

- "Good Looks", the handsome 'brains' of the gang. A fairly non-descript leader.

- "Krunch", the group's muscle and hair.

- "Non-Fat", the skinny shrimp with a chip on his shoulder. Apparently he eats a lot and stays incredibly skinny. From the way he was drawn (knowing Kirby's style) and the way he was scripted, I have the distinct impression that he was meant to be an African-American, but either the colorist got it wrong or something else behind the scenes changed the situation

- "Bananas", the kid who looks like a geek but tries to act like a spaz. He basically comes off as a complete jerk (think Guy Gardner without the fine graces).

The Dingbats' first adventure begins with the quartet hanging out on a street corner. Good Looks is reading, Non-Fat is contemplating a hot dog, Krunch is exercising, and Bananas is spazzing out, when suddenly a man in a costume leaps the fence, being chased at gunpoint by Police Lt. Terry Mullins. The man, a criminal known as Jumpin' Jack, gets himself and Non-Fat entangled in Krunch's rubber exerciser, which allows Mullins to capture the wily criminal, giving thanks to the Dingbats for their help.

Soon after the villain is taken to jail, Non-Fat chokes on his hot dog (much to Bananas' delight) and coughs up a small cylinder containing a strip of microfilm. They are immediately accosted by Jumpin' Jack's partner in crime, a helmeted goon known as the Gasser. After a brief struggle, the Gasser flees without the film cylinder, but with Non-Fat clinging to the roof of his escape vehicle ... a camper. Apparently he spent too much of his loot on his costume and gas devices to buy a proper getaway car.

The Gasser also has a second man in the camper, a person they had kidnapped for ransom earlier. Meanwhile, Mullins is interrogating Jumpin' Jack at police headquarters when the boys barge in with the film cylinder and needing help to track down Non-Fat. Jumpin' Jack takes the opportunity to escape from custody, though he is unknowningly being followed by Mullins and a police detail (who surprisingly seem to be able to follow the nimble villain from rooftop to rooftop with ease).

Jumpin' Jack meets up with the Gasser at a deserted waterfront pier (talk about stereotypical situations), and they decide that the kidnap deal is off and that the Dingbats have to pay for interfering with their plans. As they were about to kill their hostages, Mullins and the police arrive. The Gasser uses a new weapon which amounts to a flamethrower, which he uses to burn Mullins. The police lieutenant's wounds aren't enough to prevent him from dropping the Gasser with a kick, and Jumpin' Jack is also captured fairly quickly. Non-Fat and the victim are thawed out and everything is back to normal, with Mullins telling the Dingbats they can call on him for help whenever they need it (and also finds out that the Dingbats stay together because they each had a bad experience with grown-ups at one time or another).

And that was basically it for the story of the Dingbats of Danger Street. The gang appeared one more time, twenty-seven years later, in the pages of ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN. As a fairly incidental part to this story (Superman, in his blue electric form, was trying to keep Intergang from getting involved in Suicide Slum's street gangs), the Dingbats and the Newsboy Legion were squabbling over squatters' rights to the abandoned Goldberg Theater. At the end of the tale, the theater was purchased by fellow 1ST ISSUE SPECIAL alumni, the Green Team, for conversion into a youth center that both gangs could use. So pretty much besides for establishing the Green Team and the Dingbats into regular DC Continuity (and putting the Dingbats in Metropolis' Suicide Slum), there wasn't much to this story either.

Appearances:

  • 1st Issue Special #6
  • Adventures Of Superman #549

THE WRITER

The Writer was one of the members of the Suicide Squad that was assembled by Black Adam to attack Circe's island during the lamentable "War of the Gods". Apparently whatever he wrote (or in this case, typed into his laptop computer, which was suspended from a harness on his chest) happened. Unfortunately, shortly after the assault began, he got a case of 'writer's block' and got his throat ripped out by one of Circe's werebeasts.

The Writer was actually Grant Morrison, who had previously appeared in ANIMAL MAN #26, where he had a long theological and existential discussion with Animal Man, revealing that he wrote the hero's life and adventures. It was Morrison's last issue writing the book, and he wrote himself into the continuity to get some ideas across and thank his fans (and to, ostensibly, pull a deus ex machina by bringing Animal Man's family back to life). John Ostrander and Kim Yale apparently decided that this meant he was a DC character, and he became the Writer... and cannon fodder.

Appearances:

  • Animal Man #26 (as Grant Morrison)
  • Suicide Squad #58 (as The Writer)

FIREBALL

Sonya Chuikov was born to a pair of Soviet scientists in 1922. Her parents had been investigating the mysterious Tunguska Fireball that had struck central Siberia in 1908, and apparently their exposure to the aftermath of the event had a mutagenic effect on Sonya. Soon after she was born, her wrists burst into a cool, non-burning flame. The flame could heat up and cover her entire body at times when she became angry or upset. As she grew, she learned to control the fire, being able to hurl firebolts and fly for short distances. Josef Stalin made her a ward of the state, and she was drawn into the War when her village was attacked by Nazi planes. Her family was killed and she almost died herself from wounds she received while destroying some of the planes. She was one of the Allied "mystery-men" who were gathered to open a second front (along with the Squire, Kuei, and Phantasmo). Franklin Roosevelt had brought the four together to go on a War Bond Drive with the Young All-Stars.

Fireball went with Iron Munro to New York City's Columbia University, where they were attacked by Ubermensch and Gudra the Valkyrie of Axis Amerika. She was left for dead and Iron was captured by the Nazi "heroes", as were several prominent scientists (including Albert Einstein). She then proceeded to the Perisphere to get help from the All-Star Squadron, and she and the Atom headed out to try to save Iron and the scientists, who were all taken to a hidden laboratory in Kansas.

The scientists were put into a strange apparatus that would harness their intellects and will to detonate a plutonium device that Baron Blitzkrieg had hidden in Kansas City. Their test worked fine on a model, and as they prepared to use the device for real, they were attacked by a team of All-Stars (the Squire, Kuei, the Atom, Fury, Fireball, and Flying Fox). After a pitched battle with many injuries on both sides, Axis Amerika was forced to retreat.

The War Bond Drive was cancelled after those events, and Fireball returned to her homeland.

Appearances:

  • Young All-Stars #22, 24, 25, 26

KUEI

The unidentified Chinese soldier who would become Kuei was born in 1922, in Shanghai. He studied at university (where he learned English) and became a soldier. His entire regiment was slaughtered by enemy troops, and he was injured so severely that he threw himself into a nearby river to escape the pain by drowning himself. As he was dying, he saw a Japanese soldier peering down from the edge of the water, and he instinctively reached out to save himself. He grasped the soldier with the hand of a demon, and killed the man. He had become a kuei, which was, according to Chinese legend, the soul of someone who drowned or tried to commit suicide and cannot attain a further incarnation. Such a person would instead walk the Earth as a powerful and dangerous spirit. He was one of the Allied "mystery-men" who were brought together by Franklin Roosevelt (along with the Squire, Fireball, and Phantasmo) to head a war bond drive with the Young All-Stars.

Kuei was later attacked by policemen as he exited the plane that had taken him to the first War Bond Rally. Luckily, Flying Fox, Neptune Perkins, and Tsunami were on hand to calm things down. They were unfortunately unable to stop the kidnapping of three scientists (including Heisenberg) from Le Conte University by Kamikaze and Sea Wolf of Axis Amerika.

The scientists were put into a strange apparatus that would harness their intellects and will to detonate a plutonium device that Baron Blitzkrieg had hidden in Kansas City. Their test worked fine on a model, and as they prepared to use the device for real, they were attacked by a team of All-Stars (the Squire, Kuei, the Atom, Fury, Fireball, and Flying Fox). After a pitched battle with many injuries on both sides, Axis Amerika was forced to retreat.

The War Bond Drive was cancelled after those events, and Kuei returned to mainland China.

Appearances:

  • Young All-Stars #22, 23, 25, 26

KING FARADAY

King Faraday has been on the scene for quite awhile in the DC Universe, and has been for probably a lot longer than the average fan realizes. Faraday was a recurring character throughout a lot of the government & espionage-oriented super-hero titles of the eighties, including CHECKMATE, SUICIDE SQUAD, and CAPTAIN ATOM. He was "retconned" into being the mentor/contact for Nightshade when she was brought over from Charlton Comics with Captain Atom. Faraday also starred in the four-issue limited series DANGER TRAIL in the early nineties. But before all that activity, King Faraday was in virtual limbo for over twenty years ... and technically a bit longer than that. Originally, Faraday was the one of the stars of the original DANGER TRAIL series, which lasted five issues in the 1950's (and is now highly prized by comic collectors). He was created by Robert Kanigher (best known for The Metal Men and Sgt. Rock) and Carmine Infantino (best known for the Silver Age Flash, Batman, and the Elongated Man).

Faraday was a very competent and fairly dashing secret agent working for the U.S. Government's counter-espionage forces. He traveled the world, ending up in a variety of exotic locales. And, even in those pre-James Bond movie days, he got his share of attractive ladies as his companions on his journeys. Now, I doubt that there are really that many folks out there who really remember reading the original DANGER TRAIL, but many do remember those adventures because of an auspicious reprinting of them. DC Comics' published a landmark series called SHOWCASE, which was a try-out title - characters were given a short run (usually one to three issues) to see if their popularity and sales justified giving them a regular feature or comic of their own. Such Silver Age stalwarts as the Flash, Green Lantern, the Atom, the Metal Men, Adam Strange, and the Inferior Five earned their comic book wings in this manner.

The May-June 1964 issue of SHOWCASE was the 50th issue of the title, which is normally a landmark for any title (especially nowadays). That issue was the first of two featuring 'I-Spy', each reprinting two adventures of King Faraday. I don't think a lot of folks at the time realized these tales were just reprints of stories from DANGER TRAIL (and WORLD'S FINEST COMICS, to be accurate). Supposedly, a feature known as Yankee Doodle was to have headlined the issue, but it was dropped at the last moment, and the DANGER TRAIL reprints ran instead. SHOWCASE #50 did have a four-page framing sequence by Kanigher and Infantino, which may have caused a few people to think it was full of new material, but the dramatic changes in Carmine's style in the ensuing years is readily apparent to the trained eye.

There were four King Faraday stories reprinted in the two issues of SHOWCASE: "Spy Train" (which had Faraday on the Orient Express), "Hangman's House", "Hunters of the Whispering Gallery", and "Thunder Over Thailand". The introductory sequence introduces readers to King Faraday and his job as a spy for our government. The important officials that King meets give him the codename of 'I-Spy', and try their best to dissuade him from taking the thankless job ... but King Faraday is definitely their man!

- "Spy Train" (originally presented in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #64): King Faraday boards the fabled Orient Express to search for a spy who has stolen vital information from our government. The catch: No one knows exactly who the spy is or exactly what he stole, making him doubly dangerous. King gets to meet the lovely actress Vina Flora, as well as almost getting killed several times until he finally deduces the identity of the traitor in his midst.

- "Hangman's House" (originally presented in DANGER TRAIL [1st series] #2): King meets up with old friend Jimmy West, who needs the ace spy's help to find a missing scientist who is being held captive in the legendary Hangman's House. When Jimmy is killed by the same men, King heads into danger to avenge his friend and collect the scientist before the fiends can torture all of our secrets out of him.

- "Hunters of the Whispering Gallery" (originally presented in DANGER TRAIL [1st series] #1): King overhears a chance remark in the train station that indicates that someone is about to be murdered. That someone turns out to be a lovely redhead, who is being pursued by a man from her past who wants to eliminate everyone who could possibly identify him to those pursuing him for his heinous war crimes. One possible error in the 're-mix': The ending of the first story in this issue features King telling readers that 'I-Spy' was concluding in that issue "for now". I think this message was supposed to be at the end of the book, so perhaps the editors laid out the stories in this issue in the wrong order.

- "Thunder Over Thailand" (originally presented in DANGER TRAIL [1st series] #3): A man falls out of a skyscraper window and King finds a strange elephant charm clutched in his dead hand, leading the ace spy to Thailand and into the hands of a Nazi madman with a terrible new weapon.

********

DANGER TRAIL was also the name of a very underrated limited series that DC Comics put out in 1992. I don't believe it was very well received financially, and I am almost sure it was critically panned in it's day because of the creative team (and the sensibilities of the time), but this series is a little gem. A four-issue spy story that manages to entwine a whole bunch of archetypical espionage situations with a likeable hero and a very evil villain, DANGER TRAIL was a fun book.

DANGER TRAIL featured DC's version of James Bond, the operative named King Faraday. In the 1950's, Faraday starred in the original DANGER TRAIL series, a short-lived adventure anthology with a spy bent. The series was reprinted in part in SHOWCASE #50 and 51, as 'I-Spy'. Faraday has since been used infrequently but prominently as a major member of the DC Universe's intelligence community. He acted as a contact and mentor for Eve Eden, the former Charlton Comics character known as Nightshade, and has had dealings with Captain Atom, Amanda Waller (and her Suicide Squad), Sarge Steel, Checkmate, and nearly every other espionage organization. DANGER TRAIL was his first real solo outing since the fifties.

DANGER TRAIL: "The Serpent in the Garden File"

After preventing the assassination of President Ortega of San Madeira, King Faraday returned to the Washington Office of the Central Bureau of Intelligence to get his next assignment from Sarge Steel (who was Secretary of the Office of Meta-Humans). Faraday was to escort Natalia Sokoloff from Istanbul back to Washington. Natalia, the former personal assistant to Professor Gregor Mendekov, a missing nuclear physicist. She claimed to have important information on those responsible for the professor's disappearance, but would not talk until she was in Washington, as she believed her life was in danger.

Faraday met up with Natalia in a safe house, which ended up being not quite so safe as they had to escape a number of men intent on taking Natalia. Faraday and Natalia got away, and got on the Orient Express out of Istanbul wearing disguises. Faraday was again accosted, this time by the porter. Faraday dispatched him off the train, only to find himself caught between two gunsels on the roof of the train.

After using the time-honored tradition of ducking to dispatch his pursuers, Faraday returned to Natalia, who became extremely upset when Faraday absent-mindedly traced the shape of a tattoo he saw on one of his attackers on the carriage window. She attacked her companion and then jumped off the moving train, forcing Faraday to follow. By the time he caught up with her and calmed her down, the train moved on without them, forcing them to walk to the next stop. A helicopter attacked them as they traveled, but luckily Faraday got the pilot to stray too near to some power lines and the copter went down in flames. In the next town, Faraday and Natalia came to, they were again attacked but managed to escape in a power boat.

Word of Natalia's escape had reached the mastermind searching for her, who was in fact the despotic Kobra. Meanwhile, Faraday and Natalia reached Venice, where Faraday's old friend Pietro gave them some assistance. He also sold them out to Kobra's agents (and ended up dying in a hail of gunfire). Faraday used a shattered fish tank and a broken lamp to electrocute the thugs and they escaped onto the canals in a motorboat. Faraday managed to contact Sarge Steel and arrange for a pick-up in Paris, atop the Eiffel Tower.

After a rather uneventful night in the back of a supply truck (well, uneventful in terms of not being attacked, anyway ...), Faraday and Natalia reached Paris and the Tower, only to find their contact, Dupree, already dead. Kobra's men descended on them and Natalia was taken. Faraday pursued, jumping after the men onto a rope from a helicopter, only to have the belt of the man he was clinging to break, causing him to fall from the upper deck of the Eiffel Tower ...

In true James Bond fashion, Faraday managed to glide on the air currents to land atop a nearby hot air balloon. Sarge Steel met up with Faraday as he made it back to solid ground. Meanwhile, Natalia was brought before Kobra. The madman had been gathering nuclear experts from around the world to build the "ultimate weapon", a nuclear device that, when detonated, yields no harmful radiation (I assume that the explosive power would still be present, or this goes from 'ultimate weapon' to 'really stupid weapon'), in order to bring about the Kali Yuga (the age of Chaos) which was Kobra's eternal quest. Professor Mendekov told Kobra that he couldn't function without his assistant, which is why the manhunt for Natalia was commenced.

Faraday and Steel went to the French branch of the CBI (a very James Bondian operation) and was able to track the whereabouts of Kobra's stronghold by the unique radiation that one of his deceased agents was emitting, which was Chernobyl. Faraday and Steel accompanied the Russian military force that was storming Kobra's base. Faraday confronted Kobra and Kobra was forced to flee in his Ark. Faraday had booby-trapped the vehicle earlier and it exploded. Faraday and Natalia went back to finish the task of getting her safely to Washington.

Appearances:

  • Danger Trail [1st series] #1-5
  • World's Finest Comics #64
  • Showcase #50-51 (reprints)
  • Batman #313-314,333-335
  • Ms. Tree Quarterly #8
  • Danger Trail [2nd series] #1-4
  • more

BTW, Take me off the list for Slam Bradley ... don't have the time to search out the CATWOMAN issues (nor do I really want to, as I try to avoid all the Bat-Books nowadays).



The Vigilante
Member
posted March 24, 2003 02:24 AM

If no one else is doing them, I'll handle these:

12. Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man
164. The Forgotten Villains
405. Scarab
413. Silver Age SSOV

I'm currently doing a website on THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD http://members.tripod.com/braveandboldreview so I can do some more of their baddies as well, since we don't have a lot of them on the list.



Enda80
Member
posted March 24, 2003 01:54 PM

Someone asked about Jack the Ripper references. Pre-Crisis, Jack the Ripper's ghost appeared in LOIS LANE #108.



dcexplosion78
Member
posted March 24, 2003 08:19 PM

King Faraday was recurring in the Marv Wolfman run on BATMAN in the 80s and I think appeared once with Robin in NEW TEEN TITANS.



Mikel Midnight
Member
posted March 30, 2003 09:42 AM

King Faraday was also retconned-in as Nightshade's trainer and lover in an issue of SECRET ORIGINS (to senselessly replace Captain Atom) though that's just as likely been re-retconned out by now.

I was thrilled to read that summary of the Dingbats/ Newsboy Legion/ Green Team crossover, it sounds hilarious.



The Vigilante
Member
posted April 02, 2003 12:13 AM

THE ANIMAL-VEGETABLE-MINERAL MAN

Dr. Sven Larsen was a former student of Niles Caulder (a.k.a. The Chief) who had once accused Caulder of stealing one of his ideas. He had returned to demonstrate his new experiment, which involved the bombardment of amino acids by lightning that he believed to be the key to create life artifically. Unfortunately, Larsen fell into the vat of amino acids he was using and was transformed into a giant paramecium. Instead of destroying the creature, the Chief had Negative Man bring a tank of liquid oxygen to temporarily freeze it. The creature soon began a startling transformation into a living mass of sulphur that dissolved the ice. Elasti-Girl grew to giant size and picked up the sulphur being, only to have it change again into a mass of creeping ivy that she was barely able to escape. The being next changed into a bird and flew off.

Upon examining Larsen's notes, the Doom Patrol discovered that Larsen's "accident" had been planned, and that he already had discovered the ability to change into any animal, plant, or mineral form through his experiment. After a rampage through the city and a battle with the Doom Patrol, the Chief was finally able to stop the Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man with his anti-decay ray (which would halt all changes in living cells), the very device that Larsen believed that Caulder had stolen from him. The Chief and the Doom Patrol reversed the process that had given Larsen his powers and bundled him off to jail.

The Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man returned to plague the Doom Patrol several months later, right after an accident had forced the team to function with their powers switched around (Elasti-Girl had Negative Man's powers while he had hers, and the Chief and Cliff's abililties were substantially switched as well). The same device was again used to stop the A-V-M Man, and he was again sent back to prison.

Over four years later, Larsen was broken out of prison by General Immortus in order to aid him in bringing the Chief out of seclusion. This also brought him into conflict with the Doom Patrol again, at least the team that Celsius had assembled to help her find the Chief for herself. Larsen still wanted revenge on the Chief for the invention he believed was stolen, and went against Immortus' orders and attempted to kill the Chief himself. Unfortunately for the A-V-M Man, the one weapon that Immortus' men hadn't found in the Chief's wheelchair was a water pistol full of a chemical retardant to stop the villain's transformations. The Chief had miscalculated and the chemical only slowed the changes. It took Scott Fisher to almost accidentally stop the A-V-M Man by burning him severely with his hands. Celsius then encased the now normal Larsen in ice.

Appearances:

  • Doom Patrol [1st series] #89, 95
  • Doom Patrol [1st series] #122 (reprint of #89)
  • Doom Patrol [1st series] #123 (reprint of #95)
  • Doom Patrol [2nd series] #15-16


The Vigilante
Member
posted April 02, 2003 12:29 AM

VILLAINS FROM THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD, Part 1


THE CAPSULE MASTER

Vulkor was a Martian who had been exiled from Mars because he had sought to steal a super-weapon and take over the planet. The weapon was thought to have been destroyed in the final battle that resulted in Vulkor's capture, but it wasn't. It ended up on Earth inside various meteors, most of which landed around Star City. Vulkor's giant capsule (and massive robotic arm) and three Martian lackeys ended up battling Green Arrow and the Manhunter From Mars to obtain the meteors with the weapon fragments inside them. Naturally, the two emerald heroes (with help from Green Arrow's partner Speedy) was able to stop the villain's plan, and the Manhunter imprisoned the four Martians within an active volcano (?!).

Appearances:

  • The Brave And The Bold #50

THE MOLDER

The Batman was investigating a string of strange robberies that were besieging Gotham City, not knowing that they were being perpetrated by the Molder, a super-villain who wants to bring about "the age of plastic". He created a small army of "Plastoids" (polymer plastic conditioned with DNA and bio-genetic plasma) to rob a subway train and stop the Batman, who was almost killed by an on-coming train. He was saved by the timely intervention of Plastic Man, who was in town tracking the Molder on a case of his own. They pursued the Molder, but he evaded them both, rending Plas limb from limb and bogging down Batman's whirly-bat with a plastic web. The Molder's next crime was to cover City Hall in a cocoon of plastic, which used catalytic molecules to increase in size to inundate the city. The Molder also sprayed Plastic Man with the catalyst, which caused his body to do the same thing. Batman's arrival didn't help things, as he was soon caught in the virtual quicksand of Plas's expanding body. A police sharpshooter with a bazooka began firing charges into Plastic Man's body in hopes of stopping his rapid growth, but only succeeded in severing his head and shoulders from his body. Plas landed, by chance, in the Molder's laboratory, where he drank some of his memory plastic, which allowed him to regain control of his body. This freed the Batman, who knocked the Molder off the roof and into Plas's malleable hands.

Appearances:

  • The Brave And The Bold #76

THE QUEEN BEE

The Queen Bee was really Marcia Monroe, a playgirl who Batman had fallen in love with, and who double-crossed him to further the ends of an international crime organization called Cyclops. She worked with Eclipso, but eventually double-crossed the Demon of Darkness as well to save Batman and make good her escape.

Appearances:

  • The Brave And The Bold #64

SHAHN-ZI

Shahn-Zi was a Chinese myth come to life as Gotham City's Chinatown was celebrating the Year of the Bat. The Lord of the Yellow River created a force field around the Chinatown area and revealed his plans to regenerate himself, using Mayor Bill Loo's son Danny as his receptacle. Shahn-Zi's power also attracted the attention of the visiting Jim Corrigan, and his alter-ego the Spectre. The Astral Avenger and the Batman battled Shahn-Zi, and the River Lord had nearly destroyed the Spectre when the Batman found and destroyed the source of his power, a model water wheel using water from the Yellow River of China.

Years later, Shahn-Zi appeared at yet another New Year's celebration in Chinatown, though this time Bill's son Danny was presiding over the festivities. This time, the combined strength of Batman and Jason Blood (also known as Etrigan the Demon) was barely able to stop the Lord of the Yellow River from taking over the city (and Etrigan needed to get special help from his master Merlin in order to defeat him).

Appearances:

  • The Brave And The Bold #75, 137


simplicio
Member
posted April 24, 2003 06:37 PM

Would anyone be able to supply a profile of the Love Syndicate of Dreamworld? It was like an alternate JLA (including Sunshine Superman, Speed Freak, and Magic Lantern) and appeared in the 'comic book limbo' storyline in ANIMAL MAN. Have they been seen before?



Hellst0ne
Member
posted April 25, 2003 03:54 AM

Heh. I remember those. Sunshine Superman, Magic Lantern, and Speed Freak.

No, I'm sure those were invented by Grant Morrison for the story. Even creators like Joe Simon weren't THAT hippie-ish in the 70s.

/ola



John Moores 3
Member
posted April 27, 2003 12:28 PM

Is this still going? Just kidding - I love it - just spent a very enjoyable Sunday afternoon reading the "old" threads on Outpost's site!

Well, as a veteran of the first "Obscure Thread", I'll give this a "bump" and ask someone to fill in the gaps on the following obscure characters (just 'cause I wanna give them a shout-out and see their names in "print" one more time ).

Add these dudes to the list, if you would:

Moximus: The sorcerer of Pompeii who gave Supes a load o' heartache in 1980's SUPERMAN #343.

The second Hunchback (not the guy I detailed, from Fawcett's Golden Age, but a musical killer from the early-eighties Batgirl strip, who killed girls to get inspiration for his music).

The Trilligs: Those marine monsters who were the McGuffin in the clash between the evil Captain Kalamari and the Superman/Batman/Phantom Stranger team in WORLD'S FINEST #249!

Also on a W.F. tip, the Werewolf of Krypton, Lar-On was his name?

And did we ever get Whirlicane, a.k.a. Emilio Storn?

Or the villains from the Batman Sunday/Newspaper strip: The Iceberg, The Lamp, The Gopher and the lovely Sparrow?

Or the various villains known as The Blaze, with reference to the badnik in the 40s Superman Sunday strip, and the femme fatale Lil Danvers, from the Dailies a.k.a. the infamous Blonde Tiger?

Or the original Golden Age Ghost from ACTION #39, a.k.a. the tormented Brett Bryson?

I love 'em all! (And maybe they deserve one more place in the sun, at that!)



John Moores 3
Member
posted April 27, 2003 12:36 PM

Jeez... I just remembered something that'd been bugging me for a couple of days - anyone done or can do the villains from Dial 'H' for Hero - aside from the Evil Eight?

These guys are actual villains, right, not created by the Master or whatnot?: Games Master (some kind of Joker protege, right?), Sky-Raider, Coil, Wildebeest - any others? I was thinking about them the other day [I know, I know... ] but don't have any Dial 'H' stuff anymore [And I'm not in a real big hurry to track it down ] but now I know this is still going...

There was something like a Son of Satan, too, right? Grokk? Grock?



Hellst0ne
Member
posted April 27, 2003 03:02 PM

Nice to have you aboard again, Mister Moores. You've been missed. Care to cover one or two characters on the "to do" list?

Actually, "Grockk the Devil's Son" from the old Dial 'H' for Hero comics was already handled in round two or three (I think). It was written by the Mighty Mikishawm, so I guarantee you it's worth reading.

/ola



John Moores 3
Member
posted April 27, 2003 06:16 PM

You've twisted my arm! [Ah, rainy Sunday... ]


ALL-STAR:

Alter Ego: Olivia Dawson
Occupation: Student, Adventurer (retired)
Known Relatives: Unnamed mother, Craig (brother)
First Appearance: JUSTICE LEAGUE ADVENTURES #13 (Jan 2003)
Base of Operations: Apex City

All-Star joined the Justice League (animated style) as a temporary replacement for the Green Lantern John Stewart, utilizing the power of the "star-charm", an artifact belonging to the evil Weaponers of Qward. With youthful exuberance and the powers of flight, force blasts, and the ability to levitate objects, All-Star aided the JL against the Qwardians, Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy, Grodd, Chemo, a force of Bizarros patterned after the League, and climatically, Brainiac, who had mentally enslaved the Green Lantern Corps. After a crisis of confidence, All-Star saved the day... at the cost of her powers. Nevertheless, Batman himself assured Olivia that she is, and always will be, one of them. The world believes All-Star dead.


ALPHA, THE EXPERIMENTAL MAN (1962):

Alter Ego: N/A
Base of Operations: Gotham City, Earth-One
First Appearance: DETECTIVE #307 (Sep 1962)

Alpha, an android created by Dr. Burgos (named for Golden Age Marvel writer Karl?) has a busy week: he aids Batman against the Green Mask Bandits, goes on a destructive rampage after a misunderstanding, and falls in love with Batwoman. In the end, Alpha, who has super-strength but "the emotions of an infant", sacrifices his life to save Batwoman.


AQUARIUS:

Alter Ego: N/A
First Appearance: JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #73 (Aug 1969)
Final Appearance: JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #74 (Sep 1969)

Mad star Aquarius is banished from "the Council of Stars". So he does the only sensible thing - steals Starman's Cosmic Rod and destroys Earth-Two. All that remains of the planet are the JSAers who attempted to battle him - Superman, Wonder Woman, Doctors Fate and Mid-Nite, Black Canary and hubby Larry Lance, and the Red Tornado, the plucky android sent across the dimensional barrier to Earth-One, to enlist the aid of the JLA, who keep Reddy waiting two weeks as Hawkman is turned to salt (don't ask). The JLA eventually cross over, but are attacked by the mind-controlled JSA, who have been kept alive in a mystic bubble by Dr. Fate. The JLA subdue the JSA, but at the cost of Larry Lance's life, after the P.I./second banana hurls himself in the path of Aquarius' blast to save his wife. The two GLs lure Aquarius into the anti-matter universe, where he is destroyed. Black Canary leaves Earth-Two for Earth-One, as "the memories are too painful".


That's the first three anyway....



Mikel Midnight
Member
posted April 29, 2003 12:53 AM

Originally posted by Hellst0ne:


Heh. I remember those. Sunshine Superman, Magic Lantern, and Speed Freak.
No, I'm sure those were invented by Grant Morrison for the story. Even creators like Joe Simon weren't THAT hippie-ish in the 70s.


For the curious, I went ahead and timelined them (as well as Overman et al):
http://blaklion.best.vwh.net/timeline17.html



outpost2
Member
posted June 14, 2003 12:00 PM

Recently added:

the Blaze (Superman newspaper strip)
the Blonde Tiger (Lil Danvers) (Superman newspaper strip)
the Capsule Master
the Crimson Meteor
the Fly-Catcher
the Ghost (Brett Bryson) (Action Comics #39)
the Gopher (Batman newspaper strip)
the Hunchback Killer (Detective #505-506)
the Iceberg (Batman newspaper strip)
the Lamp (Batman newspaper strip)
the Love Syndicate of Dreamworld (Animal Man #23-24)
the Molder II (B&B villain)
Moximus (Superman v1 #343)
Overman (Animal Man #23-24)
Shahn-Zi
the Sparrow (Batman newspaper strip)
the Trilligs (World's Finest #249)
the Werewolf of Krypton (Lar-On) (World's Finest #256)

Recently completed:

All-Star
Alpha, the Experimental Man (1962)
Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man
Aquarius
Aquagirl (Lisa Morel)
the Capsule Master
the Crimson Meteor
the Dingbats of Danger Street
Fireball
the Fly-Catcher
the Forgotten Heroes
King Faraday
Kuei
the Molder II (B&B villain)
Shahn-Zi
the Sponge Man
the Writer





To be continued in Obscure DC Characters, Round VIII.




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