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Author Topic: Obscure DCU Characters - Round IV
outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 10:57 PM

Last year, a bunch of us had a lot of fun with a thread started by Hellstone called "Obscure DCU Characters". People tossed out names of obscure heroes and villains, and challenged others to come up with some information on them. The most prolific contributor had to have been Mikishawm, but after nine months of posts, he needed to focus his energies elsewhere, and the thread kind of faded away. In the end, about 200 lesser known characters were covered. Those posts have been archived at www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/msgboards and are available for download.

I thought that perhaps, given that holiday vacations are quickly approaching, we might try to re-ignite the thread. At least for a few dozen more entries. I'll post a few of my own to start it off, and will commit to working on a few more during Thanksgiving break. Please join in the fun!

Right now, I have ready:

Tailgunner Jo,
The original Red Tornado and the Cyclone Kids,
The Odd Man, and
Captain Thunder

By the end of the month, I'm hoping to add
the 1960's Hercules, Samson, and Atlas.


If you're looking for ideas, I believe the following is a list of all the requests to date that were never answered...

Adam Strange II
Astra, Girl of the Future
Astralad
Automan
Azrael I
the Beefeater
Blackrock
Blue Jay
Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun
Captain Incredible
Chain Gang War
Colonel Future
Crusader
El Diablo (western)
Dyno-Man of Sorrta
Element Girl
the Eliminator
Flashback
the Flying Dutchman of Time
Hacker's Files
the Homeless Avenger
the Human Hurricane
Hyper-Boy/Hyper-Man of Zoron/Oceania
Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus
Ibis the Invincible
the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron
Isis
Kolossal Kate
Lando, Man of Magic
the Liquidator
Little Miss Redhead
Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching
Marsboy
Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
Mighty Man
Mister E
Mystek
Nadir, Master of Magic
Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia
Nightwolf
Nubia
Petronius
Power Lad
Power-Man, King of Outer-Space
Pulsar
the Queen Bee (Marcia Monroe)
Sgt. Gorilla
Silver Sorcerous
Slam Bradley
Sonik
Superwoman (Kristen Wells)
Swordfish and Barracuda
the Terrific Whatzit
Tiger-Man
The Tornado Twins
Ultraa
Wendy, Marvin & Wonder Dog
Wild Dog
the Wyoming Kid
Yango the Super-Ape



outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 10:58 PM

Tailgunner Jo #1 (Sep 1988) - #6 (Jan 1989)
created by Peter Gillis and Tomosina Artis

In the early 21st century, a great quake collapsed the Great Lakes into one giant basin, and activated the ring of fire which surrounds the Pacific Ocean. In the space of 15 years, California and Japan were under layers of lava. A newborn land they called Lemuria formed in the Pacific. This disaster hastened the collapse of the governments of the USA and USSR. A brief, dark time under the rule of the Corporate Consortium was followed by the second American and second Russian revolutions. Afterward, the power of the Corporations was restricted to the Utility Cities and to Skyhook. The technology explosion that had begun in the late 20th century resumed. Genetic engineering was severely limited, focusing mostly on microbiological inventions, such as the creation of a bacterium that duplicated the petroleum-producing process. The conflicts in the Middle East region were greatly reduced, but not before the last atomic bomb exploded on Earth destroyed Jerusalem. Over time, the populace became blessed with a reasonably disease-free world. Materials research, super-conductivity, and neurosystem design became the most fruitful areas of technological progress. The Corporations found their last remaining major market to be armaments.

The Tailgunner Jo mini-series takes place in this future world, at some point between the mid-21st and mid-22nd centuries. Lars Gunnar has become bonded with the mind of his daughter Jo. Together they comprise the cyborg called Double Star. The story begins with Lars and Jo on a mission of vengeance, against the corporation called Telemachus.

A few years earlier, the husband and wife team of Lars and Maire Gunnar were working at S'atrap Ltd., a competitor of Telemachus. When their daughter Jo was born with severe birth defects, the couple learned that S'atrap was having them work with powerful teratogens on their project, although the company was well aware of the effects on pregnancy. The Gunnars quit S'atrap and brought their Double Star Project to Telecommunications-Machinery U.S. (Telemachus, for short). Lars and Maire worked hard on their cyborg research for years at Telemachus.

Then, one day, when an important armaments show was approaching, Telemachus grew impatient and demanded the couple produce a demo. The Gunnars insisted they were not ready, and Telemachus appeared to understand. Shortly thereafter, Lars and his daughter Jo were involved in a mysterious car accident. Maire was not informed of the disaster. She was instead directed to perform a new gene-matching technique on two human subjects, unaware that it was her husband and daughter that she was operating on. Maire implanted Jo's brain into a small chamber on Lars' back. Only after the operation is completed does she realize who the subjects were. She is then struck and, we are led to believe, killed. When he recovers, Lars creates a cybernetic fantasy world for Jo, and then transforms her and himself into a Double Star cyborg, complete with an extra set of retractable robot arms and a built-in rocket system.

As the mini-series concludes, Lars and Jo discover that Maire Gunnar is still very much alive. Together they get their revenge against both Telemachus and S'atrap and then, apparently, go on to live happily ever after.



outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 10:59 PM

THE RED TORNADO
created by Sheldon Mayer

Alter Ego: Abigail Mathilda "Ma" Hunkel (maiden name unknown)
Occupation: Housewife, grocer, newspaperwoman
Known Relatives: "Hunk" Hunkel (husband, first name unknown); Huey Hunkel (son), Amelia "Sisty" Hunkel (daughter); Gus and Herman Hunkel (brothers-in-law); Felix Hunkel (nephew). Note: Years later, Mortimer "Dinky" Jibbet married his childhood sweetheart, Sisty Hunkel.
Team Affiliation: Honorary member of the Justice Society of America; member of the All-Star Squadron (by default)
Base of Operations: New York City
First Appearance: All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940)
Height: 5 ft 10 in.
Weight: 230 lbs.
Eyes: Black
Hair: Brown

History: In late Summer of 1940, Gus Hunkel hits a 100-to-1 shot at the track. His winnings are used to help his sister-in-law Abigail "Ma" Hunkel to buy Schultz's Grocery. Shortly after, some racketeers make the mistake of trying to collect "protection money" from the burly Mrs. Hunkel. She musses them up, causing them to flee in their car. The criminals are not aware that Hunkel's young daughter Sisty and her small friend Dinky Jibbet have locked themselves in the rumble seat. The racketeers later discover the children and hold them in the swanky gambling house of their boss, Tubbs Torponi.

Realizing that the kids are gone, the Hunkels and the Jibbets go to Police Headquarters and ask Police Chief Gilhooley for help. Ma Hunkel tells Gilhooley that she knows it was Torponi's gang that kidnapped the kids. The Chief explains that the police have investigated Torponi and found him to be clean. When Ma insists that he be arrested, the Chief says that Torponi is a pretty powerful man in politics and that they will need evidence to arrest him. Ma realizes the Chief is afraid to act and the two families leave.

While driving home in the back seat of the Jibbet's car, Ma Hunkel continues on to her son Huey and his friend "Scribbly" Jibbet about the cops not raiding Torponi's gambling joints. Scribbly says that if the Green Lantern was on the job, they'd have the kids back already. Huey agrees. Ma Hunkel is unfamiliar with Green Lantern, so the kids explain that he fights crime after putting on a mysterious costume so he won't be recognized. This starts the wheels turning in Ma Hunkel's head.

After they arrive at the Jibbet house, Ma Hunkel asks the kids more questions about Green Lantern. They tell her that no one suspects him, and when he gets mad enough about an injustice he goes into action. Ma walks off deep in thought, leaving the boys to wonder what had happened to distract her.

Elsewhere, the kidnappers are being terrorized by Sisty and Dinky. The kids run wild around the gambling house, thwarting the criminals' attempts to grab them. Eventually, Torponi catches them and calls for his gang, but is then hit from behind by a bottle. When the gang reaches the room, they find a strangely clad mystery man standing over their defeated boss. The hero and the kids finish off the stunned criminals. The mysterious stranger calls Police Chief Gilhooley and tells him to come pick up the kidnappers of Sisty and Dinky at Tubbs Torponi's place. When the Chief asks who he is speaking to, the mystery man replies ... the Red Tornado! The hero leaves the kids armed with bottles, then flees before the cops arrive.

Soon after, Mrs. Jibbet receives a call from the police that the children have been rescued. Scribbly runs over to the Hunkel house to tell them the good news. Huey tells Scribbly that his mother took a walk two hours earlier and hasn't returned. Mrs. Jibbet arrives with the kids, who begin telling the story of how they were saved by the Red Tornado. Ma Hunkel enters, sees the kids, and asks about the excitement. She smiles as they describe their adventures with the mystery man. Mrs. Jibbet says the Police Chief never mentioned a mystery man, claiming to have rescued the children single-handedly. Ma, who is secretly the Red Tornado, is furious that the Chief has stolen her credit. She tells the families that she is going for another walk.

Soon after, the Chief brags to the press about his "heroics" and proclaims that talk of the Red Tornado is nonsense. Suddenly, the Red Tornado smashes through the window, confronting him. The Chief tells the mystery man that "he" is under arrest for breaking in, but the Red Tornado tells the Chief to shut up. Ma introduces herself to the newspaper men as the Red Tornado, the true rescuer of the kids from the Torponi gang. When policemen arrive to arrest "him", the hero plows through them and escapes. The next day, all the local papers headline the debut of the neighborhood's new protector, the Red Tornado.

Weapons and Powers: The Red Tornado has no special abilities. She relies solely on her large size and her skills as a scrapper to battle neighborhood crime.

Comments: The Red Tornado showed up at the first meeting of the Justice Society, but made a hasty retreat due to an embarrassing accident to her costume, causing her to miss her only chance to join the group. A few months after her debut, the Red Tornado took on a pair of sidekicks, dubbed the Cyclone Kids (see Cyclone Kids). The general public is unaware that the Red Tornado is a woman.



outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 11:01 PM

THE CYCLONE KIDS
created by Sheldon Mayer

Alter Ego: Amelia "Sisty" Hunkel
Occupation: None
Known Relatives: "Hunk" Hunkel (father, first name unknown); Abigail Mathilda "Ma" Hunkel (mother, maiden name unknown); Huey Hunkel (brother), Gus and Herman Hunkel (uncles); Felix Hunkel (cousin). Note: Years later, Sisty Hunkel married her childhood sweetheart, Dinky Jibbet.
Alter Ego: Mortimer "Dinky" Jibbet
Occupation: None
Known Relatives: Mr. Jibbet (father, first name unknown); Mrs. Jibbet (mother, first name and maiden name unknown); Sheldon "Scribbly" Jibbet (brother, first name assumed). Note: Years later, Dinky Jibbet married his childhood sweetheart, Sisty Hunkel.
Team Affiliation: Sidekicks to the original Red Tornado; members of the All-Star Squadron (by default)
Base of Operations: New York City
First Appearance: All-American Comics #24 (Mar 1941)

History: In late Summer of 1940, young Sisty Hunkel and Dinky Jibbet were kidnapped by the Torponi gang. Sisty's mother, Abigail "Ma" Hunkel, donned a costume and rescued the children, beginning her new career in crimefighting as the Red Tornado (see entry for the Red Tornado for details).

Over the next few weeks, the Red Tornado becomes a neighborhood legend, as "he" systematically drives out the local racketeers. Scribbly Jibbet, the teen-aged brother of Dinky, who works as a cartoonist for the Morning Despatch, is told by his editor that the Red Tornado confines "his" activities to Scribbly's neighborhood, and that Scribbly should stick around his home to get a glimpse of the mysterious character. If he can get a drawing of the Red Tornado, the Despatch will be the only paper in town with a visual of the local hero. Ma Hunkel hears of Scribbly's dilemma, changes into the Red Tornado, and offers to pose for the boy cartoonist. The next morning, the world gets its first good look at the oddly-clad hero.

One day, many weeks later, in late Autumn of 1940, the Red Tornado chases off a bully who has been picking on Sisty. The bully goes to the police and complains. The police decide that this Red Tornado business has gone on long enough. Police Chief Gilhooley, who has had a grudge against the Red Tornado ever since the Torponi affair, has given orders that the mystery man should be picked up if spotted. A group of cops find the Red Tornado and chase "him" into the zoo. Ma Hunkel places her costume on a gorilla and frees him, taking his place in the cage. When the police arrive, she tells them that the Red Tornado freed the gorilla and locked her in. After a wild chase around the zoo, the "Red Tornado" is captured and unmasked. Everyone but Scribbly and Huey Hunkel are convinced that the gorilla was the real Red Tornado.

Later that day, Scribbly tells his editor that the Red Tornado can't possibly be a gorilla because he has heard "him" talk. Scribbly's boss tells Scribbly he was just imagining things. Later, Scribbly complains to Ma Hunkel about the article which is about to run. Ma wonders why it matters. Scribbly explains that all the racketeers that the Red Tornado has scared away will read the paper and return. Ma realizes he is right and changes into the Red Tornado in order to pay the editor a visit.

Soon after, the Red Tornado appears on the window ledge of the editor of the Morning Despatch. The editor is preparing a front page that proclaims that the Red Tornado was a hoax! Just as she is about to enter the window, the Red Tornado loses her balance and falls ... passed the 28th floor, the 27th, the 26th ... down, down she goes. Luckily, the Red Tornado's pants seat becomes snagged on a 7th floor flagpole, saving her. Unfortunately, she is stranded there. The paper hits the streets and, as feared, the criminal element immediately surfaces. Within 12 hours, everyone is talking about the sudden crime wave.

Sisty Hunkel reads the paper and asks Dinky Jibbet if he has heard about the Red Tornado being a fake. Dinky refuses to believe it. Sisty says, fake or not, the gangsters need to be stopped. When Dinky says the country needs more mystery men, Sisty gets an idea and grabs her friend. She begins cutting colorful cloth and fits Dinky with a costume, explaining that she is creating two of the country's best mystery men ... the Cyclone Kids!

After making herself a matching costume, the Cyclone Kids head out onto the streets. They confront two of the city's toughest racketeers, who are counting their ill-gotten money. Sisty demands that they hand over the money. The crooks chase her around a corner, where Dinky cracks both of them over the head with a board. The kids grab the money and run, but the criminals chase them down. They are cornered at the foot of the Morning Despatch! Just as the gangsters threaten to shoot the kids, the editor of the Despatch tosses his cigar out of his window. Miraculously, it lands on the Red Tornado's snagged pants. The cigar burns through the hero's pants, freeing her. She falls on the two gangsters, saving the kids. The next morning, the Despatch retracts its previous article, stating that there is indeed a real Red Tornado after all ... and "he" now has the help of two small editions.

Weapons and Powers: The Cyclone Kids have no special abilities. They rely solely on their cunning and skills as scrappers to battle neighborhood crime.

Comments: The Cyclone Kids were sidekicks to the original Red Tornado (see Red Tornado).



outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 11:02 PM

THE ODD MAN
created by Steve Ditko

Alter Ego: Clayton "Clay" Stoner
Occupation: Private Investigator
Known Relatives: None
Team Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: River City
First Appearance: Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #2 (Fall 1978), Detective Comics #487 (Dec 1979 - Jan 1980)
Height: ~ 6 ft.
Weight: ~ 180 lbs.
Eyes: (as Clay) Blue; (as Odd Man) Wears mask with one red eye and one yellow
Hair: (as Clay) Bronze; (as Odd Man) Black

History: "He came from nowhere, garbed in a confused costume that would make a carnival clown blush with embarassment. His weapons were absurd -- impossible! But somehow he became the terror of criminals, and everyone began to wonder ... who is the Odd Man?". This is how the Odd Man was introduced in his only recorded adventure to date. This story chronicled one of the character's earliest cases in which he battled and defeated the supposed reincarnation of the first Nile Queen and her Pharoah consort.

The Odd Man is really private investigator Clay Stoner who utilizes a rubber mask, an outlandish suit, and many elaborate gadgets in order to aid in the fight against crime. In the aforementioned story, we learn that Stoner is good friends with a River City official named Judge Brass. In one panel it appears that the Judge may be aware of Clay's dual identity however this is never made clear.

The Odd Man has a very bizzare hideout ... at any given time one could simultaneously find a desk resting on the ceiling, an end table and lamp on a wall, and a door on the floor ...

however this could always change since this room could be made to tilt! All this was intended to disorient any person that the Odd Man might bring there for interrogation (not to mention it made for a pretty wild headquarters). At the story's beginning the Odd Man is shown interrogating the city's biggest jewelry fence in the hero's secret hideout. The Odd Man had somehow caused the fence to black out while sitting in his car and later would cause him to black out once again so that he could be returned to his car.

Presumably, the Odd Man is still active in River City.

Weapons and Powers: The Odd Man depends only upon his sharp wits, bizarre appearance, and oddball gadgets in his fight against crime. Among the Odd Man's many devices are his weighted extended tie, a spray he developed which melts certain plastics, powder and smoke gloves which he activates by clapping his hands together, and a slippery oil spray. He also has some unrevealed method of rendering a person unconscious (most likely through use of another spray).

Comments: The Odd Man was originally slated to appear as a back-up feature starting in Shade the Changing Man (first series) #9 (Sep-Oct 1978). The first story was completed however Shade's book was pulled from the DC line-up, along with other books, when DC made major cutbacks during the 1978 "DC Implosion". For copyright purposes, this story was included in Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #2 (Fall 1978), the second of two B&W comics which were never intended for public distribution (only 35 copies were made). The tale finally made it to the newsstand in Detective Comics #487 (Dec 1979 - Jan 1980). The Odd Man would not appear again for another twenty years, in Superboy [third series] #65 (Aug 1999).



outpost2
Member
posted November 09, 2001 11:03 PM

CAPTAIN THUNDER
Based on Captain Marvel, a character created by C.C. Beck

Alter Ego: William "Willie" Fawcett
Occupation: Employee of WHAM-TV
Known Relatives: None
Team Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Metropolis (Earth-T)
First Appearance: Superman [1st series] #276 (June 1974)
Height: (as Willie) ~ 5 ft. 2 in.; (as Thunder) ~ 6 ft. 3 in.
Weight: (as Willie) ~ 90 lbs.; (as Thunder) ~ 225 lbs.
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black

History: A group of orphan kids, of which Willie Fawcett was one, had been sent to camp every Summer. One night, when his buddies were asleep in their tent, Willie sat outside, with a funny feeling keeping him awake. He couldn't shake the feeling that something was going to happen. Suddenly, he heard a wise old owl, which swooped down and flew overhead until Willie followed. He ran off after the horned owl and followed it until he came to a hillside. The owl looked as if it would fly right into the solid rock wall, when suddenly the walls of the hill opened up. Although Willie should have been afraid to follow the owl inside, he wasn't. What he found was fantastic -- Merokee, last of the great medicine men of the Mohegan tribe.

Merokee explains to Willie that he has awaited the youth's coming. Tribal legends had foretold that one day a boy would come forth who was noble of spirit. He would be invested with great powers by the last of the great Mohegan shamans. Merokee holds up a belt with a buckle bearing the image of a lightning bolt. He tells Willie that, when he wears the magic belt-buckle, he will have seven spiritual powers. Merokee points to the words inscribed on an animal hide hanging on the wall.

  Tornado...Power
Hare......Speed
Uncas.....Bravery
Nature....Wisdom
Diamond...Toughness
Eagle.....Flight
Ram.......Tenacity

Merokee tells Willie to rub the buckle and say the magic word composed of the first letters of every name on the list. Willie rubs the buckle and speaks the word "Thunder!". A brilliant starburst and a thunderous "Sha-boom!" fill the torch-lit chamber, changing Willie Fawcett into Captain Thunder! Merokee raises his eyes to a hole in the cavern ceiling, proclaiming to the Great Spirit that his work is done and that he is ready to pass on. Captain Thunder watches in awe as Merokee is transformed into a spirit that rises out through the opening. Merokee tells Thunder that he is leaving him to battle evil wherever it may appear.

Over the next few years, Captain Thunder would fight many crimes and injustices all over the world. One memorable battle was against the Monster League of Evil. He had fought them across 1,953 dimensions of time and space. Thunder imprisons them in a misty dimension, but not before they secretly do something to him which will make him turn evil. He heads back home across the time-and-space barrier, but ends up as Willie Fawcett in an alley in Earth-One's Metropolis. Sure enough, when Willie transforms into Captain Thunder, he becomes evil, as the Monster League had planned. After two battles with Superman, Thunder is forced to use his wisdom to override the hold the League has on him. Now cured, Thunder realizes how he got lost and, using his magic word, returns to his own parallel Earth.

Weapons and Powers: Captain Thunder derives his powers from his magic belt buckle. By rubbing the buckle and saying the magic word "Thunder!", young Willie Fawcett becomes Captain Thunder. When, using the same method, Thunder transforms back into his young alter ego, Willie automatically appears safely on the ground, regardless of where Thunder happened to be. Captain Thunder has immeasurable strength, super-speed, invulnerability, the power of flight, and great bravery, wisdom, and tenacity. He can also use his magic word to break the space-time barrier and travel to other dimensions.

Comments: Captain Thunder is based on the character Captain Marvel, published by Fawcett Publications from 1939 to 1953. The character was originally going to be called Captain Thunder, but the name was changed to Captain Marvel at the last moment. Sometime after Fawcett ceased publication of Captain Marvel, they sold the character to DC Comics. Even though DC had already started publishing new adventures of Captain Marvel in late 1972, the decision was made to create a derivative of the character to battle Superman, hence Captain Thunder. The mention of "1953 dimensions" in the story is an obvious reference to Captain Marvel's last appearance at Fawcett.

It is unclear what Captain Thunder's proper time period or base of operations are. Comments were made that Willie Fawcett's crew cut is 20 years behind the times. Also, Willie suspected that he had traveled into the future, something he continued to believe even when he had ample time to check the date. One may therefore conclude that Captain Thunder was last active on his Earth in the early 1950's. Given that Willie believed Metropolis to be his own home city, albeit in the future, one can conclude that his city bears the same name.

Although Captain Thunder's parallel Earth was never formerly given a designation, it is referred to here as Earth-T (the "T" is for "Thunder", of course).



GaiDaigohji
Member
posted November 10, 2001 03:25 AM

Mister E

Name: Eric
Height: 6'0"
Weight: 175lbs
Eyes: Unknown
Hair: Black
Family: None
Residence: Boston, Massachusetts
Occupation: Historian
Group Affiliation: None
First Appearance: Secrets Of Haunted House #31
Current Status: Active

Vertigo Information: Although Mister E is now clearly based in the Vertigo Universe, he sometimes appears in the official DC Universe. Sometime in the future, Mister E will approach the heroes of Earth and urge them to band together and destroy Doctor Fate. Mister E has knowledge that the Helm of Nabu will become corrupt over the ages and pose a threat in the distant future. The heroes of Earth will mock Mister E's theories and consider him quite mad.

Powers: Mister E has the special abilities to see the good and evil in people's souls. Mister E also has the abilitiy to travel to any place that he wishes, even though he is totally blind. Mister E is an average hand-to-hand combatant and sometimes uses his wooden cane in battles. On occasion Mister E has used a handgun loaded with silver bullets and sometimes carries wooden stakes.

In addition he has the ability to walk through time, a skill tought to him by an older version of himself walking back to the late 80's from the end of time and his encounter with death (books of magic mini #4)

Limitations: Although Mister E. is totally blind, it rarely effects his ability to "see" using his innate powers. His limitations are unknown.

Principle Adversaries: Unknown

Appearances:
Books Of Magic v1 #1-2 (Jan - Feb 1991)
Books Of Magic v1 #4 (Apr 1991)
Mister E #1-4 (Jun - Sep 1991)
Secrets Of Haunted House #31 (Dec 1980) - First Appearance
Secrets Of Haunted House #32-41 (Jan 1981 - Mar 1982)
Trenchcoat Brigade #1-4 (Mar - Jun 1999)



Tenzel Kim
Member
posted November 10, 2001 05:29 AM

Yay. Obscure characters is back. How I've missed this thread.

I just love these profiles and would love to put them up on the Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe along with complete character chronologies and images and such if you'd permit me to do so.

Tenz.

The Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe
http://www.comicboards.com/dcguide/.



outpost2
Member
posted November 10, 2001 01:16 PM

Hi Tenz!

I can only speak for myself, but you can use anything I might post here. I also have images available. Just e-mail me and let me know what you need. Later.



robomax
Member
posted November 10, 2001 01:34 PM

The Big Gang
First apperance - ????
Known members - Big Ben, Big Deal, Big Bertha, Big Cheese
Adversaries - the Atom



Hellstone
Member
posted November 12, 2001 11:03 AM

THIS IS GREAT!!! I've tried to start this thread again a couple of times but never got any big response! You da man outpost. I'll contribute as soon as I get some time.

See ya soon.

/ola



Atom-Man
Member
posted November 12, 2001 01:06 PM

Blackrock

I'll have to do some research, but I can recall that he was a Silver Age villain of Superman's. He fought Superman with (suprisingly enough) a Black Rock, which I believe was a fragment of meteorite or moon rock, I can't remember which. The rock shot out rays which were powerful enough to stun Superman into submission. I'm thinking there was an issue with him from around the original SUPERMAN run #245. I'll have to look it up.


The Beefeater

First appearance I saw this character was around the #20's of JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE. He was dressed much like an 18th century English guard, with a staff that shot out energy beams. Again, I'll have to pull my old JLE's to get more info.


Blue Jay

Should be easy enough to find. His appearances were from JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA/INTERNATIONAL era, around the #70-85 timeframe, I think. He could shrink to six inch size and had gliding/flying capabilities. Someone said he met his end with Power Girl's stupid cat - he was eaten.



outpost2
Member
posted November 12, 2001 09:29 PM

Hellstone! Good to see you're still lurking around these parts!

I too missed this thread, and felt it was high time for it's return.

I decided last night to add "Starman of 1957" to my "to do" list. This was the temporary identity used by Batman, which later became the inspiration for the post-Crisis "Starman of 1951". I've already finished scanning and touching up a picture for that entry, which I'll post a link to when the text is ready.

Thanks to those of you who have already contributed to this thread, and to those who are considering it. Hopefully, I'll have a few more entries myself to post by the end of this weekend.

Later.



Hellstone
Member
posted November 13, 2001 08:54 AM

I'll return soon with more info on Blue Jay, Silver Sorceress, Automan, and Element Girl. And I know that Mikishawm has handled Astra, Flashback, Little Miss Redhead, and Queen Bee Marcia Monroe in other threads, so I'll try to find them and repost them.

/ola



Hellstone
Member
posted November 13, 2001 09:39 AM

Mikishawm's Queen Bee/Marcia Monroe piece from the Batman board:


The Gotham Blade, undated clippings:

ITEM! Gotham is buzzing with the news that our own Caped Crusader has a new passenger in the Batmobile these days. Last week, we told you how Batman had plucked bombed bombshell Marcia Monroe from the ledge of the Gotham Bridge and given her a long overdue spanking. It seems the rowdy redhead grooved on that display of brute force and has made it her goal in life to be his new partner-in-crimefighting. As more that a few of the highstrung heiress' old beaus can attest, Marcia's a crack shot with the pistol and she proved it when she blasted a billyclub out of the hand of a baddie who was about to bust Batman. Sure, we know what you're thinking. Ol' Bats doesn't have much use for firearms and -- stop me if you've heard this -- "crimefighting is too dangerous for a girl." Unfortunately for the square-jawed one, "no one tells Marcia Monroe what to do." Boy, we wonder what Robin thinks about this?

**************

BRIEFLY NOTED: Just a few days ago, the Gotham Gangbuster was talking marriage but late word has it that his flame-haired beauty has gone back to her playgirl ways and dumped the Bat. Watch out Europe --Hurricane Marcia's on her way!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The Gotham Gazette, December 9, 1965:

Gotham City's law enforcement agencies are in a state of shock this morning as the result of the overnight arrest of the famed Batman. The Masked Manhunter is accused of stealing the Cat Emerald, an international treasure currently on display at the Gotham City Municipal Museum. In a brief statement, Police Commissioner James W. Gordon indicated that the GCPD is in possession of photographic evidence that documents Batman's elevation of the gem from a perch high above the Cat Emerald's display case. The Caped Crusader's claim that he was actually returning the treasure is refuted by a Museum spokesman, whoconfirms that the Cat Emerald is missing. Batman surrendered to authorities without incident and is currently in a holding cell at GCPD headquarters.


Marcia Monroe's Private Correspondence, December 9, 1965:

My dearest Batman,

I can only imagine what you must think of me now but please believe me, I have only your best interests at heart. My love for you has not dimmed in all these months, as our kiss last night must surely have told you.

When we parted, I'd hoped to spare you from becoming involved in the scandal that threatened to disgrace out family. My father had suffered some business reversals and, to my horror, had become involved with the international organization known as Cyclops. To keep his name clear and save him from death by their assassins, I agreed to cooperate with them -- become Queen Bee of their "Hive" here in Gotham.

Fortunately, I've been granted a bit of leeway in how I deal with you and, rather than do the unthinkable and have you killed, I conceived a plan that would leave you safely out of our operations. The assassin whom you rescued me from last night was, in fact, an operative of my own and the story I told you of my murdered lover was, I'm afraid, pure fiction. The Cat Emerald was not stolen by a man determined to prove himself your equal but, instead, by our own forces. The gem that you returned to the Museum was actually a replica designed to dissolve after a short period.

Oh, darling -- please try to understand ... I had no choice! Once caught in Cyclops' web, there's no escape. I only want to put you behind bars -- out of the way of trouble."

Bruce Gordon's Journal, December 9, 1965:

As seems to happen with disturbing frequency, Eclipso has emerged from my body and evaded our attempt to banish him with a burst of light. Apparently, on one of his previous excursions, our foe has made an alliance with parties unknown. How else can we explain the appearance of a trio of flying men dressed as bees who plucked the lunar scourge from our laboratory here in the ruins of Solar City ? As I write these words, Professor Bennett, Mona and I are en route to Gotham City, where rumors of a fiend armed with an energy-projecting black diamond are even now being reported.

The Gotham Gazette, December 10, 1965:

Gotham was terrorized last night by a veritable crime wave, a series of robberies apparently spearheaded by one of North America's most notorious fugitives, the lunar-themed Eclipso, and a new player known as the Queen Bee. Clad in an orange vest, black shirt and striped pants, the mysterious red-head's features are largely concealed by a golden skullcap (complete with antennae) and domino mask. The Queen Bee and her drones (whose faces are concealed by bee-like helmets) were equipped with flight-packs that enabled them to evade any of their robbery victims with ease. Authorities have yet to establish a connection with three earlier criminals who took the name of Queen Bee, women who fought Mister America in 1942, the Blackhawks in 1951 and the Justice League of America in 1963.

"Gorilla" Grimes' Statement to Police, excerpt, December 11, 1965:

Just before I was sprung from jail, I got word from Frankie Malone that Mister E was flyin' into town to have a confab with Queen Bee and the rest of us at the Hive. I guess Bat-Brain must've heard us talking and busted out 'cause he was in the Apis Building right after I got there. I gotta admit, I held my own against the Bat for a minute or two but it was all them fancy gadgets in the walls that really did the trick. While he was dodging spring-loaded office furniture, I was pumpin' the room full of gas.

Now, understand, Mister E, um, Eclipso, and the Queen Bee are both tough cookies but when it comes to dealin' with spies -- especially big guns like ol' Bats -- they just ain't up to snuff. After I went to all the trouble of catching the Bat-bum, Eclipso just chucked his body down a chute into the river and expected him to drown. Hey, I know Mister E's an out-of-towner but he shoulda known better than that. 'Course that's nothin' compared to Queenie. She practically started blubberin' when she thought Eclipso had killed Bats and told E that he was a freak and a murderer. You'd think they were closet good guys or somethin'!

Inside The Sinister Citadels, Galaxy Publishing, 1979:

The Hive was, as one Cyclops recruiter touted it, "the biggest, most deadly underworld set-up ever conceived." Constructed over the course of 1965 as the United States branch of Cyclops' operations, Apis Enterprises seemed no different than the other skyscrapers that had popped up on the Gotham skyline in recent years. Only its name, Latin for bee, offered a hint to its true exterior, with offices on each floor sandwiching weapons, transportation and even areas devoted to training. At first glance, though, perhaps the most striking object in the building may have been the enormous eyeball that peered down from the wall of the Hive's meeting chamber. The emerald orb powerfully conveyed the fact that this was an operation named after the mythological one-eyed men.

The big eye also served as a concealed gateway for Cyclops' European enforcers, something Batman used to his advantage when he raided the facility on December 10, 1965 in the guise of one of the gang's black-hooded executioners. Unfortunately, everything in the Apis building was a potential weapon, from the furniture to the mail slots to the floor, which suddenly began to accelerate in treadmill fashion and sent Batman hurtling towards Eclipso. Fortunately, there were also concealed chamber in the roof that enabled the mysterious Queen Bee to rescue the Dark Knight.

Script excerpt from "The Batman-Tarantula Hour", 1966.

BATMAN: Queen Bee -- Marcia -- you ?!

QUEEN BEE: Yes, Batman ... I see you know who I really am. But believe me, I'm trying to save you now. Hurry, follow me -- this way!

BATMAN: Yes, Marcia, I recognized your voice before. But why have you turned criminal ? Why did you frame me ? Why ?

QUEEN BEE: I ... I had to, Batman. My father got involved with Cyclops. To keep his name clear and save him from death by their assassins, I agreed to cooperate with them -- become 'Queen' of this crime hive. I only wanted to put you behind bars -- out of the way of trouble. I never dreamed you'd turn up this way and tangle with Eclipso.

BATMAN: So suddenly you turn all goody-goody. Kind of late, baby, isn't it ?

QUEEN BEE: Oh darling -- please try to understand ... I had no choice. Once caught in Cyclops' web, there's no escape. I hated doing it to you -- the only man I've ever loved. This door -- it leads to the weapons room ... please save yourself.

BATMAN: Come with me, Marcia. I'll see that you get a light sentence.

QUEEN BEE (kissing him): Like 20 years, darling. No, you'll have forgotten me by then. It's too late for me ... but Batman must live to fight on! Good luck, darling. I'll try to stall Eclipso. Here's a souvenir of my love.

BATMAN: The Cat Emerald! Thanks, baby ... so long, for now.

Commissioner Gordon's Memoirs, recalling the events of December 10, 1965:

Batman's life quite literally hung in the balance, suspended in mid-air between the forces of the GCPD on the ground and Eclipso, firing obsidian energy blasts from his black diamond. Fortunately, the Caped Crusader had an ally in the form of Doctor Bruce Gordon. I'd previously accepted the sandy-haired scientist's offer of help, joking that "we Gordons have to stick together," but I never imagined that he'd play such a crucial role. With no regard for his own safety, Gordon rode a fire engine's ladder to the height where Eclipso was trying to blast Batman from the side of the Apis Building. Without warning, a brilliant flash of white light momentarily blinded all of us on the ground and, when we'd recovered our collective sight, the moon-faced rogue was gone. Doctor Gordon claimed to have banished Eclipso with some sort of light grenade. Frankly, I was a bit dismayed at his evasiveness on the villain's fate but, under the circumstances, I chose not to press the issue.

To my great relief, we found ample evidence within Apis Enterprises to support Batman's claim that he'd been framed, not the least of which was the Masked Manhunter's own recovery of the real Cat Diamond. The warrant for Batman's arrest was voided immediately.

Script excerpt from "The Batman-Tarantula Hour", 1966.

BATMAN (picking up a garment near Apis Enterprises): Queen Bee's costume ... Marcia's gone. Some day, she'll have to pay for her crimes -- and when that day comes, she'll need all my help. Until then -- farewell, honey!"

Inside The Sinister Citadels, Galaxy Publishing, 1979:

According to declassified CIA documents filed by agent Urania Blackwell, Cyclops' central headquarters was finally laid bare in November of 1966. The base was a former Nazi stronghold hidden in Holland that had been converted into a a major crime syndicate facility. As with Apis Enterprises, the European stronghold was replete with war machines and deathtraps, including an ultimate failsafe. In the event of the lair's exposure, "one push of a button will blow up the entire dike system - bringing the sea crashing in on half their land." The combined efforts of Metamorpho and Blackwell, alias Element Woman, prevented the catastrophic fate and captured the apparent mastermind of Cyclops, Stingaree, a green-costumed villain with a deadly artificial tail.

In early 1967, several mid-level Cyclops administrators were part of a consolidation of European super-syndicates but, with no central leadership, the organization soon collapsed. No definitive connection has been established between the Hive overseen by the Queen Bee and the subsequent Hierarchy of International Vengeance and Extermination.

The Gotham Blade, April 19, 1966:

ITEM! Batman has an itch that he can't scratch and she goes by the name of Poison Ivy! Witnesses tell us that us that the Gotham Goliath couldn't keep his lips off the auburn-haired beauty during yesterday's battle in the suburbs. We hear that Ivy only made it into custody because Robin (that spoilsport!) interrupted the proceedings. The Batty One sure seems to have a thing for redheads. Say, has anyone seen Marcia Monroe lately ?


**********

Afterword:

The strange story of Batman's affair with Marcia Monroe was recounted in late 1965's THE BRAVE & THE BOLD # 64 ("Batman Versus Eclipso"), a story subsequently reprinted in 1976's SUPER-TEAM FAMILY # 5. Though entertaining in its own right, the whirlwind romance between Batman and Marcia, who goes so far as to usurp the unmentioned Robin's place as the Dark Knight's partner, along with Batman's hip dialogue makes for a rather bizarre reading experience.


The previous Queen Bees, incidentally, fought Mr. America in ACTION COMICS # 42, 46-49, the Blackhawks in BLACKHAWK # 38 and the JLA in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 23. And there was even a fourth prior Queen Bee, this one a mutated insect who faced the Sandman in his first exploit with Sandy (ADVENTURE COMICS # 69), a story that transcends B&B # 64 for pure freakiness.


The B&B story was, of course, scripted by Bob Haney (with art by Win Mortimer), whose dialogue I've quoted throughout the above article, not all of it obviously. Haney went on use Cyclops in METAMORPHO # 10 and tossed them (and other mid-1960s criminal syndicates) into the background in BLACKHAWK # 229 and 231. Marv Wolfman's own version of the H.I.V.E. was a regular threat during the early 1980s both in various Superman-related series and, of course, THE NEW TEEN TITANS.


And, finally, Poison Ivy (created by Bob Kanigher) showed up five months after the Queen Bee, already boasting of an extensive criminal career that had yet to be uncovered by law enforcement agencies. That brings to mind an intriguing thought. Could Marcia Monroe have been an alias of Pamela Lillian Isley, using her powers to seduce Batman as a final test before her debut as Poison Ivy ? Bees and pollen naturally lead one to think of plant life and who is more familiar with plants than Ivy ?



Hellstone
Member
posted November 13, 2001 09:43 AM

Mikishawm's FLASHBACK piece from the Batman board:


The past several months had been difficult ones for Diana Prince. Steve Trevor, the love of her life, had been restored to life by the goddess Aphrodite (WONDER WOMAN # 223) only to perish again at the hands of a madman (WW # 248). Seeking a new start as an astronaut with NASA in Houston, Texas (WW # 252), Diana found herself feeling homesick for New York and her job with United Nations security (WW # 255). The last straw came when Diana, as Wonder Woman, unmasked the new leader of the Royal Flush Gang in Texas -- and found her new boyfriend, Mike Bailey staring back at her. Within twenty-four hours, Diana Prince had left the space program, intent on returning to the U.N. (WW # 256).

The U.N.'s head of security was convinced that Diana was a security risk (WW # 256) and said as much (WW # 263) but the young woman still had plenty of friends who wanted to see her back. Hoping to ease some of the tension, they invited her to a reception for French ambassador in Manhattan's Gramercy Park in October of 1979. Making the most of it, Diana was only too happy to hold back when Batman, of all people, stepped in to stop a trio of gun-toting thieves in stocking masks.

Working through the crowd, Diana eventually cornered Bruce Wayne for a personal thank you. He was in the Big Apple, he explained, on behalf of the Wayne Foundation. The United States had been privately pushing for France to be the home of a proposed European automotive plant and Bruce was there to consult with the ambassador. "It means jobs ... prosperity ... and an important step toward easing international trade tensions."

As Bruce joined the ambassador, Diana spotted an intruder on the grounds and realized that Wonder Woman was going to have to make an appearance, after all. The stranger wore a violet body suit with blue tinted goggles and a white gas mask. His gloves were white as was the icon on his chest, a circle with lines of varying lengths erupting from it as if in a burst of light. And, most ominously, he wore holster belt that contained a gun of sorts, a weapon he was prepared to draw on the Amazing Amazon.

Accustomed to deflecting bullets with her bracelets, Wonder Woman nearly laughed when several small green glass spheres struck her. In a moment, her eyes were burning and she was lost in a fog of emerald gas. And suddenly it was 1968 again and a powerless Diana Prince was entering the mansion of millionaire Robert Fass in search of Doctor Cyber (WW # 180). "Go BACK!"screamed Steve Trevor from the top of a staircase. "Get OUT OF HERE!" "You're walking into a TRA ..." The cracking of gunfire roared in Diana's ears and a sobbing Wonder Woman could do nothing but scream.

Alerted by the agonizing cry, Bruce Wayne made his apologies to the ambassador and rushed outside to help the still disoriented Amazon. As his JLA teammate regained her composure, Bruce observed that it "sounds like a drug flashback ... a chemically-induced case of deja vu. Normally it only happens to people who've had a bad trip on LSD."

A collective chill ran through Bruce and Wonder Woman when she recalled that the intruder had a French accent. Racing to the ambassador's side, they were horrified to find the elderly Frenchman convulsed and giggling in a state of madness. The attack of the thieves and the masked subsequent confrontation with Wonder Woman had both been efforts to divert attention from his true target. "There shall be no 'deals' between the people of France and the American traitors!" a note read. "The ambassador is a warning. Anyone who attends the Paris conference will suffer at the hands of Deja Vu!"

Vowing that the economic summit would proceed, Bruce Wayne took his place at the meeting the following week while Wonder Woman paid a visit to the DuBois chemical plant elsewhere in Paris. "Several of the compounds used in the fog were developed at (DuBois)" and "the glass spheres containing the fog used a form of silicon unique to this region of France." The Amazing Amazon was stunned to find "the man we call Flashback" at the site and intently mixing a new brew of his mind-altering compound. Having managed to distract his opponent for a second time, Flashback escaped again, gloating that "you cannot stop me, ma jolie cherie. The traitors will die! They will die -- tonight, in memory of one who died before!"

Aware that he'd have costumed interference, Flashback made it a point to fire a volley of spheres at Batman and Wonder Woman before proceeding with his attack on the international delegation. In a heartbeat, Bruce Wayne was nine years old once more, reliving the murder of his parents and vowing that, this time, he would strike back at their killer. In his delirium, Batman hammered Wonder Woman with punches, convinced that he was pummeling Joe Chill. The beating, coupled with Diana's "Amazon constitution," shielded her from the effects of the nightmare fog but she was far from secure.

Diana and the deranged Dark Knight were now dangling above the streets of Paris, prevented from falling only by a thin loop of Wonder Woman's lasso wrapped around a rooftop spire. Pulling the lasso free, Wonder Woman and Batman began to descend rapidly, finally jolting the Dark Knight back to reality and putting his acrobatic skills to the test as he dived for the cushion of a fabric restaurant awning.

Rushing into the meeting, the Justice Leaguers found Flashback standing on top of the conference table, tossing dozens of glass spheres and laughing maniacally as the economists began to relive the darkest hours of their lives. The Amazing Amazon twirled her lasso into a cyclonic force that blew the fog towards Flashback, obscuring his vision long enough for Batman to land a knockout punch on his jaw. Now aware that even his iron will wasn't enough to withstand the villain's drug, the Dark Knight wore a gas mask as he prepared to air out the room.

Following the terrorist's incarceration, authorities learned that Flashback had been a chemist at DuBois whose "father lost his life working in an American canning plant in southern France ... All his life, he's BLAMED it on Americans and American business."

His confidence still shaken by the effects of the gas, Bruce Wayne wondered what his own hatred of crime said about his mental state. "There IS a difference, Bruce," she emphasized. "HIS obsession ALMOST made him a killer. YOUR obsession leads you to SAVE lives."

"Thank you, Diana," Bruce nodded. "I need to be REMINDED of that, now and then ..."

Published in October of 1979, THE BRAVE & THE BOLD # 158's "Yesterday Never Dies" represented the beginning of a new era in that title's history. Hoping to inject some new voices and perspectives into the venerable Batman team-ups, editor Paul Levitz had removed veteran writer Bob Haney from the book in favor of a succession of guest-writers working with artist Jim Aparo. Gerry Conway was the first of these and, making it a family affair, he featured a villain created by his wife, Carla. Flashback had originally been called Deja Vu, a name that still survived in the art on the villain's manifesto. Destined to be a one-shot wonder, Flashback was sentenced to a long stay in his prison, where he relives his mission of vengeance to this day.



Hellstone
Member
posted November 13, 2001 11:09 AM

My own Element Girl piece (with help from DarkMan's Indexing Domain):

Element Girl was originally Urania "Rainie" Blackwell, a U.S. espionage agent who successfully infiltrated the European crime syndicate known as CYCLOPS (mentioned above in Mikishawm's "Queen Bee" biography. Unfortunately, the unsecure Urania fell in love with and married the leader, the terrorist codenamed Stingaree. She was spurned by the man she fell in love with, and volunteered for a mission to expose herself to radiation in an Egyptian temple. This action was duplicating the process by which a man named Rex Mason became Metamorpho, the Element Man.

Like Mason, Urania became an elemental being, looking almost exactly like the freakish Metamorpho (except for getting long green hair instead of Rex's baldness). Shocked by her new appearance, Urania sought out Metamorpho's help in defeating Stingaree and CYCLOPS. (METAMORPHO (Vol. 1) #10, January-February 1967)

Following this incident, Urania adopted the codename "Element Girl" and hang out with Metamorpho from time to time. Noted mostly for being inactive in the background (METAMORPHO (Vol. 1) # 11, March-April 1967), or getting kidnapped by the evil Professor Zorb and turned against her allies (METAMORPHO (Vol. 1) #12-13, May-August 1967), she nevertheless acted as a full-fledged heroine against such menaces as the midget Thunderer, who actually managed to split Metamorpho and Element Girl into three beings apiece. Luckily, a teenage genius put them back together. (METAMORPHO (Vol. 1) #14-15, September-December 1967).

When Metamorpho was tried, sentenced, and executed (obviously, it didn't work) for the murder of a Wally Bannister (Sapphire Stagg's former husband), Element Girl was there to save him. Together, they then encountered Algon, an ancient Egyptian elemental like themselves, after which they went away to free Metamorpho from the false murder charges. (METAMORPHO (Vol. 1) #16-17, January-April 1968).

Shortly after this, the METAMORPHO series was cancelled, and the storyline remained unfinished. When Metamorpho next appeared, teaming up with the Batman in THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD (Vol. 1) #101 (April-May 1975), he was free from the murder charges and Element Girl was nowhere to be seen.

Fact is, she wouldn't be seen for another twenty-two years. Metamorpho himself appeared from time to time, in THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD, WORLD'S FINEST, ACTION COMICS, JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA, in the mid-80s as a member of the OUTSIDERS, and still later in JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE, but no writer seemed to want to bring Element Girl back. Neither did she show up in CRISIS ON INFINITE EARHTS, HISTORY OF THE DC UNIVERSE, or even WHO'S WHO, where such obscure parties as Automan, Claw the Unconquered, and Chris Kl-99 appeared.

Enter the Sandman. Just like yours truly, Neil Gaiman always had a soft spot for many of the lesser-known characters in the DC Universe. In SANDMAN #20, he taught us what happened to Rainie. She had developed romantic feelings towards Metamorpho, but Rex only had eyes for his Sapphire. Heartbroken, Urania had a breakdown, and spent many years completely alone, abandoned by her employers and afraid to interact in society, because of her freakish appearance. She considered suicide, but couldn't do it - a metamorph's greatest curse is that he or she is virtually immortal. No temperature, no poison, no known force on Earth can kill them.

However, Death of the Endless felt Rainie's despair, and comforted her. She herself couldn't give Rainie the peace she wanted, but she pointed out that one of her kin, Algon, had actually died (in METAMORPHO #17), so eternal peace was not impossible. Death then helped Rainie get into contact with the Egyptian Gods that had granted her her powers in the first place.

Rainie looked into the face of the sun god Ra, and finally made her peace with the Gods. She was transformed into dust and claimed by Death. (THE SANDMAN (Vol. 2) #20, October 1990)

After her death, Element Girl finally got her own Who's Who page in the loose-leaf format WHO'S WHO IN THE DC UNIVERSE #10, June 1991, featuring art by Colleen Doran and Malcolm Jones III.

Recently, she had a retrospective one-panel cameo, showing her interacting with Metamorpho, in SILVER AGE SHOWCASE #1, July 2000.

I think those are actually all of her appearances. I know Rex mentioned her in an issue of JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE, but can't remember when.

Element Girl Stats:
Height: 5'10"
Weight: 130 lbs.
Hair: Green (as Urania: Blonde)
Eyes: Black (as Urania: Blue)



Hellstone
Member
posted November 13, 2001 11:52 AM

Additions and comments to the other bios:


Tailgunner Jo - thank you, Outpost. I always wanted to know more about this character. The only I've seen of her is a cameo in the Elseworlds MXYZPTLK/BAT-MITE: WORLD'S FUNNEST.


Red Tornado I - she also appeared in the recent ALL-STAR COMICS 80-PAGE GIANT. And a variant of her was part of the Justice League in the Elseworlds KINGDOM COME. In a recent issue of YOUNG JUSTICE, we were told that she is dead.


Cyclone Kids - not "Cyclone Twins" as Peter David keeps calling them, have aged normally and married, and were part of the "Old Justice" team seen in YOUNG JUSTICE and the SINS OF YOUTH miniseries.


Captain Thunder - had a cameo as one of many alternate Captain Marvels in THE POWER OF SHAZAM a couple of years ago.


Mister E had a cameo in the UNDERWORLD UNLEASHED - ABYSS, HELL'S SENTINEL, December 1995.


Blackrock - there were two Blackrocks. One older and then his nephew, Les Vegas (!). He/they was actually a corporate hero, owned by some TV company that rivaled Morgan Edge's Galaxy Communications.

Post-Crisis, it was assumed that Blackrock never existed or battled Superman, but in JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA #43 (October 1990), he appeared fighting the League together with Black Mass, Crowbar, Brainstorm, the Cavalier, and Sonar.

I'm not sure, but I think that Blackrock was later one of the villains who got their weaponry absorbed by the Replicant in the pages of FLASH about a year ago.


The Beefeater was actually Michael Morice, the caretaker of the JLI London Embassy, first seen in JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL (vol. 1) ANNUAL #3 (1989). In JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE #20 (November 1990), he adopted the garb of the Beefeater, who he claimed had been worn by his father, fighting alongside General Glory in the second World War. The Beeafeater wanted to join the JLE, but only managed to destroy their Paris Embassy. Later, the Beefeater fought Eclipso during the "Breakdowns" storyline, and was humiliatingly defeated. When last seen, the Beefeater took off together with JLI Liaison Camus. They have not been seen since.

The character of Morice/Beefeater was based on John Cleese, or rather, his character Basil Fawlty from "Fawlty Towers".


Blue Jay - let me return with a full biography of him. I just want to add that he appeared much earlier than the JLI era. He, along with Silver Soceress, Wandjina, and Jack B. Quick first appeared in the original JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #87, February 1971. AND I want to point out that he is still alive, although he hasn't been seen since JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE #48, March 1993.

/ola



Hellstone
Member
posted November 16, 2001 09:56 AM

The Automan biography:
(main source: WHO'S WHO #2)

AUTOMAN
Created by Lee Elias
First appearance: TALES OF THE UNEXPECTED #91, November 1965.

Stats:

Alter ego: Robot #32198
Occupation: Robot for hire
Known relatives: Miller Sterling (creator), Ilda (wife)
Group affiliation: None
Base of operations: Robot Tech University
Timeframe: Late 21st century
Height: 6'11"
Weight: 514 lbs.
Eyes: Photocellular
Hair: None
"Skin": Golden metal

History:

Dubbed "Automan - the automatic man" by his creator, Professor Miller Sterling, robot #32198 was the first graduate of Robot Tech, an institute for higher learning designed exclusively for mechanical men, a.k.a. "computer men". These artificial intelligences were fed a wealth of information via intricate teaching computers, then programmed for independent action.

After graduation, Automan embarked on a successful career as a robot-for-hire, working as everything from a mechanical manservant to a beautiful blonde actress. His missions inevitably made him come into contact with danger, adventure, and heroism, often together with his master Miller Sterling, and the latter's beautiful daughter Stella. (TALES OF THE UNEXPECTED #91, October-November 1965, #94, April-May 1966, and #97, October-November 1966.)

At the end of the 21st century, Automan encountered the intergalactic detective known as Star Hawkins, and his robot secretary Ilda. While Hawkins got romantically interested in Stella Sterling, Automan fell in robotic love with Hawkins' android assistant Ilda. They chose each other as life-mates and now consider themselves married. (DC COMICS PRESENTS #33, May 1981)

Automan's body apparently still exists in the late 30th century, and will be displayed at the robot section of the Time and History Museum in Metropolis. (LEGIONNAIRES #68, February 1999)

Powers and weapons:

Constructed entirely of meteorite manganese, Automan's body is completely bullet- and fireproof. The robot's internal equipment includes a forehead film recorder, a radar-scanner, a powerful electromagnet, laser-beam eyes, and a self-contained parachute system. Furthermore, Automan possesses superhuman strength and, by virtue of his programming, is an excellent hand-to-hand combatant. His knowledge and intelligence rate is extremely high according to human standards.



the4thpip
Member
posted November 16, 2001 12:53 PM

Astralad was the Superboy villain with the long hair and funky outfit, right? If I find that issue, I'll write something up about him.



Rajah
Member
posted November 16, 2001 05:58 PM

Ibis the Invincible was a Fawcett Comics character who first appeared in WHIZ COMICS #2 (which also contained the debut of Captain Marvel among others). He and the other Fawcett heroes were acquired by DC in the 1970s.

Ibis was originally Prince Amentep of ancient Egypt. He was chosen by Thoth (the God of Wisdom) to bear the Ibisstick, a magic wand which could grant its owner's every wish. Amentep and his lover Taia had everything their hearts desired but soon grew bored. They were also oppressed by Amentep's cruel relative (his uncle, I believe), the Black Pharoah. Using the Ibisstick, they placed themselves under a spell of sleep and vowed to awaken in "more interesting times."

Believed to be dead, their mummified bodies were later found by archaeologists and placed in seperate museums. Amentep ended up in Fawcett City. In the 1940s, he was awakened by the wizard Shazam who knew of the prince from his years in Egypt. (An unnamed man looking at the sarcophagus in the original Fawcett story was revealed as Shazam in DC's THE POWER OF SHAZAM.) Ibis (as the museum employees had nicknamed him) set out to find his lost love, Taia. Once they were reunited, Ibis began operating as a mystery man and joined the loose affiliation of heroes who worked for Shazam in Fawcett City, among them Spy Smasher, Minute Man, Bulletman, Bulletgirl, Mr. Scarlet, and Pinky. (Pre-Crisis, they were known as the Squadron of Justice and were the heroes of Earth-S. They were featured in a crossover with the JLA and JSA in the 70s.)

I know little of Ibis' Golden Age stories other than the fact that the Black Pharaoh resurfaced, kept alive by dark sorcery. After the war, Ibis returned to his mystical sleep and was awakened in modern day by Mary Marvel in an issue of THE POWER OF SHAZAM. In that series, Ibis was depicted as being very bored because of his near infinite power. His youth faded later in the series, supposedly due to something in the Genesis crossover (perhaps Thoth withdrew his influence from the Ibisstick). There was also some tension between Ibis and Taia but the two eventually reconciled. Unless I am mistaken, Ibis has returned to his mystic sleep to await "more interesting times" once more.



outpost2
Member
posted November 18, 2001 04:24 PM

HERCULES

Alter Ego: Born Alcides, renamed Herakles, later adopted the alias Hercules
Occupation: Demigod
Known Relatives: Zeus (father); Alcmene (mother, deceased); Iphikles (half-brother, deceased); Amphitryon (step-father, deceased); Megara (first wife, deceased); Deianira (second wife, deceased); Hebe (half-sister, third wife, annulled); Perseus (great-grandfather, deceased); Andromeda (great-grandmother, deceased); Hera (step-mother); Ares (half-brother); Hephaestus (half-brother); Athena (half-sister); Apollo (half-brother); Artemis (half-sister); Hermes (half-brother); Dionysus (half-brother); Hestia (aunt); Hades (uncle); Poseidon (uncle); Demeter (aunt); plus many more relatives (too numerous to mention)
Group Affiliation: The Gods of Olympus
Base of Operations: 12th century BC Greece and Italy, late 20th century Earth
First Appearance: (Earth-S, mentioned only) Whiz Comics #1 (#2 on cover) (Feb 1940);
(Earth-Two) All Star Comics [first series] #8 (Dec 1941-Jan 1942);
(Earth-One) Wonder Woman [first series] #105 (April 1959);
(Parallel Earth future) Hercules Unbound #1 (Oct-Nov 1975)
Height: 6 ft. 5 in.
Weight: 327 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Black

History: The story of Hercules begins some 3200 years ago, in the nation of Greece. Amphitryon, grandson of Perseus and Andromeda, had married his cousin, the beautiful Alcmene. One year, while Amphitryon is away at war, the adulterous god Zeus, who had come to desire Alcmene, devises a plan to have her. On the night the general is to return home, Zeus disguises himself as Amphitryon and sleeps with Alcmene, conceiving the child that would later become Hercules. Zeus then slips away as the true Amphitryon returns. Amphitryon in turn sleeps with his wife, conceiving a second child. Hera, the wife of Zeus, becomes enraged when she learns of this latest "conquest", however she is powerless to take her anger out upon her husband, so she vows she will take it out on his son instead.

As his son's birth approaches, Zeus declares that the next descendant of Perseus to be born will be the future king of Mycenae. Hera succeeds in delaying the delivery just long enough to allow Eurystheus, another grandson of Perseus, to be the first born. Alcmene then gives birth to two sons, Alcides and Iphikles. Amphitryon and Alcmene soon learn that Alcides is not really Amphitryon's son, but Zeus'. A few weeks after the twins' birth, Hera sends two snakes to kill Alcides in his cradle. Alcides grabs both of the snakes, protecting his defenseless brother, and squeezes them to death. After that, Alcmene so fears Hera's wrath that she decides to abandon Alcides. Athena, seeing what has transpired, tricks Hera into taking a walk, whereupon they encounter the abandoned child. Athena prevails upon Hera, the goddess of childbirth, to tend to the hungry infant, whom they name Herakles, "the Glory of Hera". The infant unintentionally hurts Hera though, and she hurls him away.

As an adult, Herakles marries Megara, daughter of King Creon of Thebes. Hera later places a spell of madness upon Herakles, causing him to murder his wife, their three sons, and his brother's two children. To atone for his sins, Herakles goes to Delphi, where the Oracle instructs him to serve his cousin, King Eurystheus, and perform twelve labors on Eurystheus' behalf. One of those labors is to steal the girdle of the Amazon queen, Hippolyta. Herakles is uneasy about an unprovoked attack on the Amazons, but Ares taunts him, claiming Herakles is afraid of a mere woman. Angry at the attack on his masculinity, Herakles leads a mighty army to the Aegean island of Themiscyra, the home of the Amazons. When they arrive, Hippolyta challenges Herakles to single combat. Using the great strength granted to her by the magic girdle, a gift from the goddess Aphrodite, Hippolyta defeats him. Unfortunately, Hippolyta allows herself to be seduced by Herakles into letting him hold the girdle, which he steals. Herakles and his army then attack, defeat, and enslave the Amazons. Hippolyta prays to Aphrodite and, with her help, regains the girdle and their freedom. The goddess then guides the Amazons to Paradise Island, where they become immortal and eternally young, providing they remain there, apart from the world of men.

After his labors are completed, Herakles is freed from his debt, and he goes on to take part in many heroic adventures. At one point, Herakles travels to Italy, changing his name to the Latin form "Hercules", and spends several years there defending it's people. The exploits of the mighty demigod become well-known throughout the region. In fact, a few generations later, the legends of Hercules would inspire another Roman hero to continue on in his name. In the end, though, Hercules longs for home, so he says his farewells and returns to Greece.

Years later, Hercules marries for a second time, to a woman named Deianira, daughter of King Oenus of Aetolia. When Deianira becomes jealous of another woman, she is tricked into putting a deadly poison, which she is told is a love potion, onto a cloak. When Hercules dons the cloak, it becomes stuck to him, and he begins to die an agonizing death. He struggles to build a huge pyre and has it set afire. Hercules' mortal self burns away, but what remains rises to Mount Olympus, fully transforming the demigod into an immortal. Once in Olympus, Hercules finally reconciles with Hera, and he marries her daughter Hebe to bind the two closer together.

Nearly a 1000 years later, in the gardens of Mount Olympus, Hercules observes Ares and another god, Cyphus, falconing with their birds. Ares is particulary proud of his bird, Redclaw, who was a gift from their father Zeus. On this day however, something goes terribly wrong. Redclaw is killed by Cyphus' bird. Hercules has never seen Ares so distraught over the death of any creature. Ares bends over his falcon, touches it, and suddenly it lives again. It is then that Hercules realizes that the god of war also possesses the power to restore life.

Over the next few decades, Hercules and Ares begin to feud over mankind. Hercules feels most gods treat men as puppets. This attitude is not well received by the gods, especially by Ares, but not for the reasons Hercules believes. Soon after the fall of ancient Greece, circa 300 BC, the gods begin to blame themselves for the failings of their mortal children. They formulate a secret plan, envisioned as a divine exorcism, designed to free them from the vestiges of evil that still linger in them all. Zeus, Hera, Hermes, Athena, and Ares combine their divine energies to isolate their dark sides, literally extracting them from their very beings. An entity of pure evil is spawned by the exorcism, something the gods had not foreseen. Using armaments forged by Ares, they stun the creature, but it is only a temporary solution. They require a more permanent means of restraining the dread anti-gods they have created. After desperately striving for alternatives, only one solution presents itself. It involves mounting a conspiracy against Zeus' beloved son, Hercules.

Hercules is invited to, and attends, a grand feast in which his usual nemesis Ares plays a most gracious host. Hercules is drugged through a nectar he consumes, and an entire unit of Olympian warriors are required to subdue him until the drug takes effect. Unconscious, Hercules is carried to a remote Mediterranean isle that the gods had selected, where enchanted chains are fettered by Ares' hammer. Ares places a spell of invisibility around the island, and Poseidon provides fearsome behemoths to stave off any potential visitors. Hercules awakens, finding himself all alone, bound to a rock, incorrectly believing he is solely a victim of Ares' treachery. For more than two thousand years, Hercules remains chained, as no being ventures remotely near the island.

On October 9th, 1986, a nuclear missile strikes Greece, it's point of origin unknown. A limited nuclear exchange ensues. Ares is intrigued by the potential for great battle, and heads to Earth. On October 20th, a subterranean race of mole-people, bent on conquering the surface world, trigger the launch of scores of missiles, which escalates the war. The last bomb falls on October 29th, then the Earth falls silent.

Four weeks after the outbreak of World War III, a young boy and his dog sail perilously close to the small isle, the same day that the constant thrashing of Hercules' titanic strength is finally enough to break the enchanted bonds. Hercules figures that Ares is either dead or up to something, and he vows revenge. He hears the boy, Kevin, and his dog, Basil, fighting off a sea beast from their sailboat. Hercules, occupied with rescuing the teen from the raging sea creature, doesn't realize that the rock he has left behind is the prison the gods had created to contain the anti-gods. It was Hercules' strength, channeled through his chains, that was binding the rock and making it an inescapable cell. Hercules is also not aware that the long dormant anti-gods have amassed enough power to thrust out one of their number, the Anti-Ares, who hastily needs a physical shell in which he can rest and slowly strengthen his malevolent force. While Hercules finishes off the beast, Kevin is possessed by the escaping anti-god.

After saving the boy and his dog, Hercules realizes that Kevin is blind. Kevin relates the tale that brought him to the island. He was in Athens with his brother Jason. Jason and their father were in foreign service, his father was the U.S. Ambassador to the Vatican. Air raid sirens began to blare, and the two brothers and their dog ran for cover. Jason shoved Kevin into a shelter, but was incinerated himself by the nuclear blast. After spending two weeks underground, Kevin came out. When he was attacked by scavengers, he ran to the docks and escaped with his dog on a sailboat. Hercules then introduces himself. He explains that his enemy Ares, the god of war, had bound him to this rock, and that he will seek him out and get his revenge. Elsewhere, in Rome, Ares watches a battle in the streets. He delights as he pits one side against another, reflecting that it has been a long time since he was last on this world.

Three days later, Hercules and Kevin arrive in Rome. They are attacked by Ares' forces, and Hercules is amazed at how well Kevin handles himself without seeing. Soon, Hercules confronts Ares himself. Ares sends a creature he calls the Smasher against his enemy. Kevin ultimately kills the beast with a slingshot. He realizes too late that the Smasher was his father, mutated beyond recognition. Hercules turns to face Ares, but the god of war is gone.

After many weeks, Hercules and Kevin make it to Paris, where they meet Dave Rigg, Simon St. Cloud, and Jennifer Monroe. Hercules battles Cerebus, who has been sent by Ares. Cerebus captures Jennifer and flees. Hercules and Kevin descend into the underworld, where they rescue Jennifer from Cerebus' clutches. Pluto, the god of this dark realm, is convinced by Orpheus to allow these innocents to leave.

A few weeks later, Hercules, Kevin, and Jennifer sail across the English Channel to London, on their way to find Dave Rigg and Simon St. Cloud. They are attacked by cat-people and brought to England's new self-proclaimed ruler, Hunter Blood. Mutated by radiation, Hunter uses his deadly eye beams to defeat Hercules and capture Jennifer. Hercules is later found by other animal-men, led by the ape Durak. Hercules and Kevin are taken to the National Medical Research Center in London. Durak explains how animals evolved and humans disappeared. Before the war, Durak was a mere lab animal. Researchers, led by Dr. Janson, were testing a chemical called Cortexin, developed by an American doctor named Michael Grant. When the bomb exploded, Dr. Janson, his assistant, and an orderly were turned to dust, along with every other human in the area. A mist spread through the room from some beakers broken on the floor. Cortexin was spreading everywhere, reaching all across London. The animals evolved to their current state in a matter of hours. Kevin postulates that he too has been mutated. Hercules soon defeats Hunter Blood, and rescues Jennifer, but Kevin's dog Basil is killed in the process.

Hercules, his friends, and his new animal-men allies are attacked by Ares warriors. Hercules finally locates Ares at Stonehenge. He sees that the god has captured Dave Rigg and Simon St. Cloud. Hercules and Ares then enter into battle. Hercules learns the reason why Ares hates him so. Ares believes that their father Zeus spurned him for his half-brother. Hercules finally wins the fight, and a truce is called. Remembering that Ares possesses the power to restore life, he asks that Basil be revived. Ares raises the dog in return for his freedom. Hercules states that if he finds Ares again, one of them will die.

While on his way back to his camp, it begins to dawn on Ares that if Hercules is free, then the anti-gods' prison must have been breached. Up until this point, Ares resentment of Hercules had blinded him to that fact. Ares begins to panic, and returns to Olympus with his forces to warn the other gods. An ominous cosmic storm begins to form around the extradimensional home of the gods.

Back on Earth, Hercules, Kevin, Jennifer, and Dave arrive in Loch Ness in Northern Scotland. They are captured by Casper Zedd, who has been mutated by radiation. Zedd claims he has met, and now serves, the Loch Ness Monster. When Zedd summons the beast, Hercules recognizes it as Oceanus the Titan, who he had fought eons ago. Hercules surmises that Oceanus felt the vibrations of the nuclear bombs in the netherworld where he lay dormant. Thinking the end of the world had arrived, Oceanus had returned to Earth. Hercules battles the creature, sending it back into the void from which it came.

Shortly thereafter, Hercules, Kevin, Jennifer, and Dave travel on a raft on the Irish Sea. They are unaware that they have entered a timewarp, which has drawn them six years into the future. They are suddenly attacked by 1944 jet fighters, which destroy the raft. Hercules saves Kevin and Jennifer, but Dave appears to drown. When they reach land, they are taken by android women warriors to meet their creator, Lady Agatha Simms. Lady Simms tells them that, before the war, she had become a master technician, who designed advanced computer systems for various governments. Her machines can reach through the time-barrier and call up a simulacrum of any war machine from the last five decades. For the last few months, she has been engaged in a war game with some unknown opponent. It started when a few of her planes were shot down over the Isle of Man, and they have been going at it ever since. Lady Simms demonstrates that she can restore Kevin's sight, but will only make it permanent if they help her beat her opponent. Elsewhere, Dave grabs a floating log and makes it to shore. He is captured by a robot and brought to Lady Simms' mysterious opponent.

Hercules leads his friends and a band of android warriors across the Irish Sea to the Isle of Man. They fight their way into the opponent's fortress, but are shocked to learn that their enemy is Dave, now hooked up to a vast computer network. Dave uses the machines at his disposal to beat back his attackers. Dave, attempting to understand what has happened to him, learns he is being controlled by an energy being, the animate representation of the Simms Analogue Data Energizer, the most advanced computer defense system ever devised. The entity has been under an unprovoked and ever-escalating attack by Lady Simms for the last several weeks. It has recently become convinced that nuclear retaliation is inevitable, but because of a built-in failsafe in it's programming, it requires a human operative to launch any nuclear weapons. The entity is soon proven right when Lady Simms, who believes Hercules has failed, sends a nuclear bomb to the isle. The entity disposes of the threat, then forces Dave to launch nuclear missles at Lady Simms' citidel. Jennifer destroys some machinery, which causes the device to which Dave is attached to explode, but not before the missiles are launched. Hercules is able to stop all but one, and it is heading for Lady Simms' citadel. Jennifer then presses an auto destruct button, which begins a destruct sequence. Hercules, Kevin, Jennifer, and Dave leave just in time, watching from the sea as the island explodes. When they arrive on the English coastline, they are surprised to find Lady Simms' citadel still standing. She explains that she simply sent the missile back to another time, to October 9th 1986 in Greece. Kevin begins crying, refusing any further help, revealing to her that it was she who started World War III.

After returning to London, Dave Rigg dies from his injuries, and is buried. Elsewhere, in one of London's few remaining laboratories, three scientists use a laser synchrotron to dissect a strange fragment, which unleashes millions of gallons of water. Hercules, Kevin, and Jennifer find one of the scientists dying. He tells them that this devastation occurred when they chipped a sample of an unidentified substance. They were getting reports that there was more of the substance in America, in the Great Lakes region ... blocks twenty times the size of the fragment they had. The trio acquire a plane, and Kevin is somehow able to fly them to America. They head to Lake Ontario, where they encounter Gardner Grayle and Douglas Herald of the Atomic Knights, who are also looking for the blocks, created by the evil Doctor Skuba. The Knights are unaware that their teammate, Bryndon Smith, has been consumed by a being of pure energy, spawned by a 50-megaton blast which exploded a half-buried meteorite. After a fierce encounter, Hercules defeats the creature.

Later, in Detroit, the Atomic Knights are amazed by the new, impervious armor that Hercules has forged. While flying back to the Knights' headquarters, Kevin suddenly blasts them from the plane. Hercules saves the falling heroes, but is himself shaken loose. Kevin uses missiles to attack them, but Hercules takes the plane down with a boulder. The gods of Olympus watch from their extradimensional realm, stating they have made a grave error. The anti-gods grow stronger, but the gods themselves are trapped in Olympus by the ethereal forces of a temporal storm. They combine their mental forces to send a message to Hercules. As Hercules restrains Kevin, Jennifer receives the message, warning them of some danger. Kevin then transforms into a dragon and attacks. Hercules stops the creature, and the dragon becomes Kevin once again, but Jennifer has been killed during the battle. Kevin runs to the plane and flies to the Mediterranean, with Hercules hanging on. They arrive on the isle on which Hercules was originally bound. Kevin then transforms into the Anti-Ares, who has finally reached peak strength.

Hercules struggles against the Anti-Ares, but it buries him under a pile of rocks. The Anti-Ares then frees and merges with the rest of the anti-gods, and they leave for Olympus. Hercules rises from the debris, then rides on twin bolts of ethereal lightning sent by the gods. He arrives through the cosmic storm just ahead of the anti-gods. Hercules is told the truth by Zeus and is sickened by their deception. The anti-gods invade Olympus and a great battle commences. Hercules decides that the only way to defeat the anti-gods is by destroying the realm they hope to conquer. The common cause of stopping the destruction of Olympus provides the one bond that draws the two halves, gods and anti-gods, together again. Hercules leaves Olympus in disgust, preferring instead to live among men. When he arrives back on Earth, he finds Kevin's dog Basil, but he is also shocked to find Jennifer alive. Zeus has returned her to life, hoping one day that his son can forgive him.

Weapons and Powers: Hercules possesses unimaginable strength and is virtually immortal. Only a force of immense power can even momentarily stun or harm him. Hercules has the ability to call upon his fellow gods in a manner which involves extradimensional communication. Although his war club is his best known weapon, he relies mainly on the power of his own two hands. He is also a master of most ancient forms of weaponry.

Comments: The history described above is virtually the same for all parallel Earth versions of Hercules, up until the creation of the anti-gods. Some differences include such things as Hippolyta being called Hippolyte on Earth-Two, and Hercules contributing to Shazam's magic lightning on Earth-S. The birth of the anti-gods presumably caused a divergence in the timestream, leading to the timeline in which Hercules was chained up for over two millennia. The Earth-One Hercules appeared, unchained, in the 20th century in WONDER WOMAN [first series] #259 (Sep 1979) - #261 (Nov 1979), establishing without a doubt that the events of HERCULES UNBOUND took place in an alternate reality. In DC COMICS PRESENTS #57 (May 1983), when Superman sees the black-haired Hercules, he remarks that the Hercules he had previously met had red hair, indicating that there were two distinct Hercules in Earth-One continuity. The future Hercules, seen in HERCULES UNBOUND #1 (Oct-Nov 1975) through #12 (Aug-Sep 1977), also appeared in a dream sequence in DC COMICS PRESENTS #57 (May 1983) and in WHO'S WHO: THE DEFINITIVE DIRECTORY OF THE DC UNIVERSE #10 (Oct 1985).



outpost2
Member
posted November 18, 2001 04:25 PM

HERCULES II

Alter Ego: Hercules, alias Tarkus, alias Roger Tate
Occupation: (as Hercules) Hero, (as Tarkus) Stablehand, (as Roger Tate) Reporter
Known Relatives: Unnamed family members
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: 10th century BC Greece (Earth-One)
First Appearance: Adventure Comics #257 (February 1959)
Height: ~6 ft. 4 in.
Weight: ~255 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Red

History: Very little is known of the second man to go by the name Hercules. While it is clear that this red-headed hero is not the black-haired demigod once known as Herakles, who performed the legendary twelve labors, including the attack on the Amazons, it is just as clear that he does have some relationship with the gods of Olympus, and thus with his predecessor. Perhaps he is one of the many descendants of Herakles, following in his ancestor's footsteps. Perhaps he is the Roman hero who followed a few generations after Herakles' death, who was befriended by the Olympians, and who has since settled in Greece. Perhaps he is Herakles himself, who has had his appearance altered for a time by some sorcerer's spell. Or perhaps he is the spirit of Herakles, temporarily trapped in the body of a mortal man. No one but Hercules and the gods of Olympus themselves can know for sure.

The red-haired Hercules' first contact with the 20th century comes when Lex Luthor, who is imprisoned in Bleak Rock Prison near Metropolis, creates a time-ray which he uses to draw Hercules from the past. Hercules is at the Oracle's cave in Greece, seeking information from the wise man about the cause of a solar eclipse. A strange glow surrounds the hero, he fades from his own time, and appears in Luthor's cell. Luthor, who had learned ancient Greek in preparation for this scheme, explains that an evil king has imprisoned him and taken his gold. Hercules frees Luthor, then the two go to Luthor's hideout. The evil scientist uses a device to teach Hercules English while he sleeps. The next morning, Luthor and Hercules "retrieve" Luthor's "stolen" gold from Fort Knox. Hercules soon discovers the deception however, and helps Superman capture his enemy. Superman recognizes Hercules from when he met him in Smallville as Superboy, but Hercules has no memory of the meeting. Superman theorizes that crossing the time-barrier to the past must have wiped out his memory of the Smallville visit. In truth, Hercules wouldn't meet Superboy for another few years, one of the peculiarities of time-travel.

Hercules asks Superman if he could stay awhile, so that he might observe the future civilization. Superman agrees. He rents Hercules a room, buys him a suit, and tells him he will put him in contact with a friend, Clark Kent. Soon after, Clark introduces the disguised Hercules to Perry White as Roger Tate, a reporter. Roger is given a job at the Daily Planet and is introduced to Lois Lane, who he is immediately attracted to. Soon, Roger falls for Lois and asks her to marry him. Lois tells him they have just met and, besides, there is only one man for her, Superman. Roger reveals to Lois that he is in reality the legendary Hercules. Lois explains that Superman is still her heart-throb. The spurned Hercules begins to compete with Superman for her affections.

As Roger Tate, Hercules travels to Athens to cover a festival. That night, he goes to the secret cave of the eternal Oracle. Hercules asks the Oracle to summon the gods from the past, which he does with a pinch of time dust. Hercules tells the gods he is on a mission in the future, and requires their magic powers and weapons. They grant them to him, but warn him they must only be used for good. Hercules then battles Superman, using the new powers at his command. Aphrodite appears, telling Hercules that Zeus is furious over his abuse of their gifts, but Hercules continues fighting. Superman uses his time-travel powers to draw both Hercules and himself back into the past. As Superman had hoped, Hercules loses all memory of the future. Hercules tells the "stranger" before him that he must go consult the Oracle about the strange blackening sun. Satisfied that the problem is resolved, Superman flies back into the timestream and returns home.

After a time, Hercules meets and befriends the mighty Samson, another hero of his own era. They eventually find themselves under the rule of King Zarl. Zarl is a greedy miser, who taxes his people into poverty so he can increase his royal fortune. Zarl forces Hercules and Samson into being the royal guards at his treasure cave, day and night. They are unable to appear elsewhere to aid others, except in disguise, hence they adopt secret identities. Hercules becomes Tarkus, a stablehand, while Samson becomes Merrio, a court jester. They begin to secretly distribute the King's fortune to the poor. To keep Zarl from entering the cave and finding the jewels missing, they make up a supernatural tale of the Avenger, who they claim has taken over the cave. They tell the King that even their great strength cannot defeat the powerful spirit. The King informs the heroes that he will keep their families as hostages until they think of a way to defeat the Avenger. If they fail, both Hercules and Samson will be executed.

Desperately, the duo consult their friend, the Seer, who peers into the future with his crystal-ball. They observe the exploits of Superboy, who they soon learn is invulnerable. Believing he has an elixir which could bestow invulnerability on them, the Seer casts a magic spell which transports the two heroes into the future. The spell also apparently gives them both the ability to speak modern English. 12-year-old Clark Kent attends a sideshow at the Smallville County Fair, starring Hercules and Samson. Clark soon learns that they are not actors, and later confronts them as Superboy. The two heroes try to learn the secret of the invulnerability elixir, but soon realize that no such potion exists. Their only hope is for Superboy to return to the past with them. The magic spell will soon wear off, so Hercules and Samson blackmail Superboy into coming with them, threatening to reveal his secret identity if he doesn't. They hurry to a predetermined hilltop, where the sunset draws them all back into the past. They then explain the situation to Superboy in more detail, who says he will try to think of some way to save them both from execution.

Hercules and Samson don their secret identities and head to the royal arena, where a big show is scheduled for King Zarl's entertainment. Superboy is forced to reveal himself when a stray war club almost strikes the kind Queen. Zarl believes that Superboy can defy the Avenger and tells him that, if he succeeds, it will save Hercules and Samson from execution. The two disguised heroes hurry back to the cave, so that they are there when the King arrives. When Superboy attempts to enter the cave, he is thrown out by the magic of the Avenger. Suspicious, the King insists on seeing the cave for himself, with the three strongmen as his bodyguards. Suddenly, the Avenger appears! Neither the heroes nor the King's soldiers can defeat the supernatural menace. The Avenger soon chases off the King, telling him the jewels are lost to him forever. Superboy then reveals to his allies that the Avenger is really Krypto, his Super-Dog, who he had summoned from the future. Superboy had supplied the Avenger's voice with his super-ventriloquism. Superboy and Krypto then fly back to their own time, leaving Hercules and Samson to free their families.

Some time later, Hercules finds himself drawn one more time into the future. When Lana Lang breathes in the scent of a weird tropical plant, called the hate flower, she develops a deep hatred of Superboy. Using a magic mask from the supernatural section of the Smallville Museum, she summons various people from the past. The magic of the mask compels those summoned into doing whatever Lana commands. At one point, she calls upon Hercules, Samson, and Atlas. She commands them to destroy the Smallville Scientific Institute, then sees to it that the destruction is blamed on Superboy. After the deed is carried out, the three heroes are returned to their own eras. Eventually, Lana is cured by her father, Superboy, and Krypto.

Weapons and Powers: Hercules possesses tremendous strength and stamina. Unlike his namesake, he is neither invulnerable nor immortal.

Comments: In DC COMICS PRESENTS #57 (May 1983), when Superman sees the black-haired Hercules, he remarks that the Hercules he had previously met had red hair, verifying that the adventures of the red-headed Hercules were still part of Earth-One continuity.

Hercules (Earth-One, 10th century BC) : Adventure Comics #257 (Feb 1959), Action Comics #267 (Aug 1960) - #268 (Sep 1960), Superboy [first series] #110 (Jan 1964)

Hercules (Earth-One, Jimmy Olsen's dream) : Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #16 (Oct 1956)

Hercules (Earth-One, criminal in disguise) : Superman [first series] #112 (Mar 1957)

Hercules (Imaginary Tale of Earth-One) : Action Comics #279 (Aug 1961)

Hercules (Cosmic Man in disguise) : Superman [first series] #155 (Aug 1962)

Hercules (Parallel Earth) : Action Comics #320 (Jan 1965)



outpost2
Member
posted November 18, 2001 04:27 PM

SAMSON

Alter Ego: Samson, alias Mighty Youth, alias Merrio
Occupation: (as Mighty Youth and Samson) Hero, (as Merrio) Court jester
Known Relatives: Unnamed family members
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: 10th century BC Greece (Earth-One)
First Appearance: Adventure Comics #257 (February 1959)
Height: ~6 ft. 4 in.
Weight: ~260 lbs.
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black

History: The biblical Samson was born circa 1090 BC, to the Israeli tribe of Dan, in a region adjacent to the Philistine territory. Samson was a man of great strength, a Nazirite consecrated to God who, for religious reasons, had never cut his hair. In fact, he believed his strength derived from his devotion to God, and that if his hair were ever cut, his strength would leave him. He was one of the last Judges to lead Israel, a duty he performed for some 20 years.

Samson's downfall came when he fell in love with a woman named Delilah, from the Valley of Sorek. The rulers of the Philistines went to Delilah and offered her a small fortune in silver if she could learn the secret of their enemy's great strength. With this knowledge, they would overpower Samson and subdue him. Delilah's first three attempts at learning his secret were unsuccessful but, after nagging him day after day, claiming he would tell her if he truly loved her, Samson relented and confided in her. Delilah sent word to the rulers of the Philistines, who soon arrived with the silver they had promised her. Delilah then put Samson to sleep on her lap, and called a man to shave off the braids of Samson's hair. Samson awoke from his sleep, finding his enemies around him, but he quickly learned that his mighty strength had left him. The Philistines seized Samson, gouged out his eyes, and took him down to Gaza, where he was imprisoned.

Some time later, the rulers of the Philistines assembled to offer a great sacrifice to their god Dagon, and to celebrate the capture of their enemy. They brought Samson out to the temple to entertain them, not mindful that his hair was beginning to grow back. The temple was crowded with many people, and all the rulers of the Philistines were there. Samson instructed the lad who held his hand to position him where he could feel the pillars that supported the temple, so that he might lean against them. Samson prayed to God to strengthen him just once more, so that he might get revenge on the Philistines. He then reached toward the two central pillars on which the temple stood. Samson pushed with all his strength, bringing the temple down upon himself and on all the people in it. Samson's family retrieved his body and brought him back home to be buried.

The Greek hero known as Samson was not the biblical hero described above. Evidence suggests however that he could be his grandson or grandnephew. It is very possible that, when the first Samson was captured, some of his family fled to Greece, where they settled. So what then is known of this hero named Samson who battled evil 3000 years ago?

Samson's first contact with the 20th century comes during his teen years. Jimmy Olsen is contacted by a man named Kasmir, who convinces Jimmy that he is a time policeman from the future. Kasmir tells Jimmy, who is an honorary member of the Legion of Super-Heroes, that the Legion have detailed him to assist Jimmy on a vital mission into the past. He brings Jimmy to the Legion time bubble, and offers to allow him to take the controls. Kasmir instructs Jimmy to take them about 3000 years into the past, where he will explain their mission. Once there, Kasmir draws a heat-blaster gun. He tells Jimmy he is really a criminal from the future, who escaped and stole the time bubble. The complex controls stumped him, but luckily the automatic controls were set for the late 20th century. Kasmir figured that Jimmy, being an honorary Legionnaire, would know how to operate the device. He fires the heat-blaster, but Jimmy dodges the beam, which hits the time bubble instead. This, in turn, sets fire to an adjacent pile of logs. A teen arrives, saying it took him all morning to cut that timber. Jimmy, who has spent time in this period before, understands the youth's language. He is amazed when the teen easily kayos Kasmir with one punch.

Jimmy asks the teen what his name is and why he is wearing a turban. The teen responds that it is his business, that a wise man had warned him to keep his real name secret or his enemies would destroy him and his parents. He introduces himself instead as Mighty Youth. Jimmy explains that he is from the future, and asks Mighty Youth's help in hiding the time bubble. The teen brings Jimmy and the time bubble to a secret room within the walls of the city. He then lends his stranded guest some clothes and gets him a job with a shepherd. After a hard day's work, Jimmy comes up with an idea to make more money, but ends up being arrested instead. Later, his new friend rips the bars out of the dungeon wall. Mighty Youth's turban is knocked off, revealing his long black hair underneath. Given the time period, the long hair, and the teen's strength, Jimmy concludes he must be Samson. Mighty Youth admits that Jimmy is correct, but tells him that a Seer had foretold that he would have a giant's strength only as long as he never cut his hair. Kasmir overhears this secret and devises a plan.

As Mighty Youth and Jimmy pass a small shop, the lovely Delilah comes out and stops them. Mighty Youth tells her he is in a hurry and cannot stay. Although Delilah admits she finds him very attractive, Mighty Youth says he has no time for romance. Jimmy, incorrectly believing this is the biblical Samson, reflects on how Delilah will someday cause Samson's downfall. Later, as they sleep, Kasmir attempts to cut off Samson's hair. Superman arrives just in time, having followed the time bubble's locator signal. Kasmir throws a vibro-grenade, whose vibrations begin to shake the place apart. Superman braces himself against the columns to protect his friends. However, at that very moment, the guards arrive to arrest Jimmy. Superman tells his friends to go, while he pushes down the supporting columns. The whole city wall topples, preventing the guards from following. Jimmy introduces Samson to Superman. Superman notes to himself that he has already met Samson as a grown man. Superman then flies Jimmy and Kasmir back to their proper eras.

After reaching adulthood, Samson abandons the Mighty Youth identity. He continues combating evil under his real name. In the years that follow, Samson meets and befriends Hercules, another hero of his own era. They eventually find themselves under the rule of King Zarl. Zarl is a greedy miser, who taxes his people into poverty so he can increase his royal fortune. Zarl forces Samson and Hercules into being the royal guards at his treasure cave, day and night. They are unable to appear elsewhere to aid others, except in disguise, hence they adopt secret identities. Samson becomes Merrio, a court jester, while Hercules becomes Tarkus, a stablehand. They begin to secretly distribute the King's fortune to the poor. To keep Zarl from entering the cave and finding the jewels missing, they make up a supernatural tale of the Avenger, who they claim has taken over the cave. They tell the King that even their great strength cannot defeat the powerful spirit. The King informs the heroes that he will keep their families as hostages until they think of a way to defeat the Avenger. If they fail, both Samson and Hercules will be executed.

Desperately, the duo consult their friend, the Seer, who peers into the future with his crystal-ball. They observe the exploits of Superboy, who they soon learn is invulnerable. Believing he has an elixir which could bestow invulnerability on them, the Seer casts a magic spell which transports the two heroes into the future. The spell also apparently gives them both the ability to speak modern English. 12-year-old Clark Kent attends a sideshow at the Smallville County Fair, starring Hercules and Samson. Clark soon learns that they are not actors, and later confronts them as Superboy. The two heroes try to learn the secret of the invulnerability elixir, but soon realize that no such potion exists. Their only hope is for Superboy to return to the past with them. The magic spell will soon wear off, so Samson and Hercules blackmail Superboy into coming with them, threatening to reveal his secret identity if he doesn't. They hurry to a predetermined hilltop, where the sunset draws them all back into the past. They then explain the situation to Superboy in more detail, who says he will try to think of some way to save them both from execution.

Samson and Hercules don their secret identities and head to the royal arena, where a big show is scheduled for King Zarl's entertainment. Superboy is forced to reveal himself when a stray war club almost strikes the kind Queen. Zarl believes that Superboy can defy the Avenger and tells him that, if he succeeds, it will save Hercules and Samson from execution. The two disguised heroes hurry back to the cave, so that they are there when the King arrives. When Superboy attempts to enter the cave, he is thrown out by the magic of the Avenger. Suspicious, the King insists on seeing the cave for himself, with the three strongmen as his bodyguards. Suddenly, the Avenger appears! Neither the heroes nor the King's soldiers can defeat the supernatural menace. The Avenger soon chases off the King, telling him the jewels are lost to him forever. Superboy then reveals to his allies that the Avenger is really Krypto, his Super-Dog, who he had summoned from the future. Superboy had supplied the Avenger's voice with his super-ventriloquism. Superboy and Krypto then fly back to their own time, leaving Samson and Hercules to free their families.

Some time later, Samson finds himself drawn one more time into the future. When Lana Lang breathes in the scent of a weird tropical plant, called the hate flower, she develops a deep hatred of Superboy. Using a magic mask from the supernatural section of the Smallville Museum, she summons various people from the past. The magic of the mask compels those summoned into doing whatever Lana commands. At one point, she calls upon Hercules, Samson, and Atlas. She commands them to destroy the Smallville Scientific Institute, then sees to it that the destruction is blamed on Superboy. After the deed is carried out, the three heroes are returned to their own eras. Eventually, Lana is cured by her father, Superboy, and Krypto.

Weapons and Powers: Samson possesses tremendous strength and stamina. Like his namesake, Samson loses his extraordinary power whenever his long hair is cut.

Comments: The Samson depicted in ACTION COMICS #279, an imaginary story, was seen battling the Philistines, and may well have been the biblical hero described above. The version shown in SUPERMAN'S GIRL FRIEND, LOIS LANE #19 must have been a dream based on a number of discrepancies. Most glaring is the fact that the adventure took place in Rome, a thousand years after Samson's other exploits. Another is the method of time-travel, caused by the fumes of a strange hallucinogenic plant. Finally, Lois had the ability to understand and speak the native tongue. It is likely that she had learned earlier from Superman that Samson used the cover of Merrio as a secret identity, something she incorporated into her dream.

Samson (Earth-One, 10th century BC) : Adventure Comics #257 (Feb 1959), Superboy [first series] #110 (Jan 1964), Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #79 (Sep 1964)

Samson (Earth-One, Jimmy Olsen's dream) : Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #16 (Oct 1956)

Samson (Earth-One, criminal in disguise) : Superman [first series] #112 (Mar 1957)

Samson (Earth-One, Lois Lane's dream) : Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #19 (Aug 1960)

Samson (Imaginary Tale of Earth-One) : Action Comics #279 (Aug 1961)

Samson (Earth-One, Lightning Man in disguise) : Superman [first series] #155 (Aug 1962)

Samson (Parallel Earth) : Action Comics #320 (Jan 1965)



outpost2
Member
posted November 18, 2001 04:28 PM

ATLAS II
created by Jack Kirby

Alter Ego: None
Occupation: Defender and avenger
Known Relatives: None
Team Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Various
First Appearance: 1st Issue Special #1 (April 1975)
Height: ~ 6 ft. 6 in.
Weight: ~ 280 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Brown

History: Many eons ago, in a time when mankind was rising out of barbarism, there lived a mysterious people who came from the fabled Crystal Mountain. One fateful day, an evil slaver and his men attack the village of these quiet people, burning their homes and capturing the inhabitants as slaves. Hidden by his parents in a nearby cave, the child named Atlas watches the terrible scourge. Atlas sees that his mother is among the captured, but his father resists against overwhelming odds, exhibiting strength many times that of an ordinary man. Eventually he is overpowered and is struck down. The grief-stricken Atlas runs to his father's aid, only to be snatched up by the cruel slaver. With a single blow, the child fells the brutish man. Swift as he is strong, young Atlas races to a marsh for safety.

A traveler named Chagra, who had been hiding in the marsh, grabs Atlas, covers his mouth, and tells him to keep quiet. Soon, the slavers give up the search and depart. The child, still in Chagra's grip, grabs Chagra and tosses him into the marsh. Atlas rushes back to the village, only to find his father among the dead. An annoyed and perplexed Chagra watches as Atlas digs through the ruins of his home, only to emerge with a large, glowing crystal. Chagra realizes that the villagers had come from the Crystal Mountain, kneels, and offers his apologies to Atlas. Chagra states that it is said that the leader of Atlas' people bears a piece of that mountain, and must pass it on when he dies. Atlas proclaims that he is the new leader. Chagra tells Atlas that where Atlas leads, he will follow. The grief-stricken boy is indifferent to Chagra's offer, telling Chagra the choice is his -- only vengeance is on his mind.

Chagra follows Atlas for years, until the boy becomes a man. The two share times of great hardship and danger. Many are witness to Atlas' exhibitions of strength and courage, and the legend of "Atlas" spreads. Heroic deeds become his mark. Victory follows victory. Atlas wins many trophies and gifts, such as the golden Helmet of Champions.

One night, Chagra confesses his true motivations to Atlas. He explains that he has waited for years, until Atlas was ready to bargain. He will lead Atlas to his goal, the evil slaver who killed his father and captured his people, if Atlas will in turn lead Chagra to the Crystal Mountain. Atlas understands, and a bargain is struck. Their next stop would be the Lizard Kingdom of Hyssa. Having lived in the accursed kingdom himself, Chagra leads Atlas past the illusions of the fire wizards, through the dismal gloom of a giant cavern filled with great lizards, and into Hyssa, a city of great wealth and power.

Chagra brings Atlas to the marketplace, where Atlas shows off his strength by crushing two large blocks of stone under his mighty arms. When the crowd proclaims that it must be a trick, Chagra asks if anyone dares challenge Atlas. Kargin, the strongest one present, known throughout Hyssa, takes the challenge. With a single blow, Atlas vanquishes Kargin. At first the crowd is amazed, but they quickly turn on the duo when they suspect treachery.

The angry crowd causes delay to an approaching noble of the king, and the slaves who carry him upon their shoulders. The noble's two warriors attack Atlas, but are easily defeated. When the king's noble tells the two strangers that they'll answer to him, Atlas scatters the noble's slaves, toppling the cart upon which he sat. Atlas grabs the noble, who screams for their deaths. The king's archers arrive and take aim. Atlas holds the noble out as a shield.

Suddenly, Atlas hears a voice from his past, the voice of the slaver who captured his village. It is the voice of Hyssa, who is now king of the city that bears his name! Hyssa asks what manner of fool dares to mistreat one whom he favors. He looks deep into the eyes of Atlas and grows uneasy. Hyssa asks if they have met before, then asks who he is. Atlas replies that he is Hyssa's conqueror!

Although the outcome of the conflict has never been chronicled, there can be no doubt as to it's resolution.

Weapons and Powers: Atlas rarely has need for weapons, relying instead on his mighty strength and agility. It is not clear if his superhuman abilities derive from the glowing crystal taken from the Crystal Mountain, or are instead inherent in his genetic makeup. Although it is clear that his father was mortal, there is evidence that suggests Atlas may himself be an immortal.

Comments: Based on comments about the spread of his legend, implying he is the Atlas of Greek myth, the adventures of Atlas must take place at least 3,500 years ago. However, given the historical link between his name and the city of Atlantis, it is possible that Atlas lived during the era of that ancient city, which existed from around 1,000,000 years ago to around 45,000 years ago. A character resembling Atlas appeared in KINGDOM COME #2-4 (1996), which is set in the early 21st century A.D.. The character, also named Atlas, is described in the Kingdom Come card set as a "legendary demigod figure", suggesting that he is the same character described above.



outpost2
Member
posted November 18, 2001 04:29 PM

ATLAS III

Alter Ego: Unknown
Occupation: Hero
Known Relatives: None
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: 10th? century BC Greece (Earth-One)
First Appearance: Superboy [first series] #110 (January 1964)
Height: ~6 ft. 5 in.
Weight: ~255 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Blonde

History: Who was the blonde-haired Greek hero that men called Atlas? He wasn't the black-haired Titan of myth, who once lifted the world itself on his shoulders (metaphysically speaking, of course). Nor was he the ancient demigod who hailed from the Crystal Mountain. The truth is, very little is known of this man, including whether or not he was himself a demigod.

Atlas' only known contact with the 20th century comes when he is drawn into the future by magical forces. When Lana Lang breathes in the scent of a weird tropical plant, called the hate flower, she develops a deep hatred of Superboy. Using a magic mask from the supernatural section of the Smallville Museum, she summons various people from the past. The magic of the mask compels those summoned into doing whatever Lana commands. At one point, she calls upon Hercules, Samson, and Atlas. She commands them to destroy the Smallville Scientific Institute, then sees to it that the destruction is blamed on Superboy. After the deed is carried out, the three heroes are returned to their own eras. Eventually, Lana is cured by her father, Superboy, and Krypto.

Weapons and Powers: Atlas possesses tremendous strength and stamina.

Comments: Superman met Atlas the Titan in ACTION COMICS #353 (Aug 1967). Atlas of the Crystal Mountain was introduced in 1ST ISSUE SPECIAL #1 (Apr 1975).

Atlas (Earth-One, 10th? century BC) : Superboy [first series] #110 (Jan 1964)

Atlas (Earth-One, criminal in disguise) : Superman [first series] #112 (Mar 1957)

Atlas (Parallel Earth) : Action Comics #320 (Jan 1965)



Hellstone
Member
posted November 22, 2001 01:20 PM

Okay, we've been handling, so far: Tailgunner Jo, Red Tornado I, the Cyclone Kids, Odd Man, Captain Thunder, Mister E, Queen Bee Marcia Monroe, Flashback, Element Girl, the Beefeater, Automan, Ibis, Hercules, Samson, and Atlas. Not a bad work for two pages.

So, this would be the updated request list:

Adam Strange II
Astra, Girl of the Future (I KNOW I have seen a bio on her, I'll keep searching)
Astralad (are you doing some progress, the4thpip?)
Blackrock (has been partly covered, but I think we can find people who know more)
Blue Jay (coming soon)
Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun
Captain Incredible
Chain Gang War
Colonel Future
Crusader
El Diablo
Dyno-Man of Sorrta
the Eliminator
the Flying Dutchman of Time
Hacker's Files
the Homeless Avenger
the Human Hurricane
Hyper-Boy/Hyper-Man of Zoron/Oceania
Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus
the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron
Isis
Kolossal Kate
Lando, Man of Magic
the Liquidator
Little Miss Redhead (I've seen a bio of her, too. Just stay tuned.)
Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching
Marsboy
Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
Mighty Man
Mystek
Nadir, Master of Magic
Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia
Nightwolf
Nubia
Petronius
Power Lad
Power-Man, King of Outer-Space
Pulsar
Sgt. Gorilla
Silver Sorcerous (upcoming)
Slam Bradley
Sonik
Superwoman (Kristen Wells)
Swordfish and Barracuda
the Terrific Whatzit
Tiger-Man
the Tornado Twins
Ultraa
Wendy, Marvin & Wonder Dog
Wild Dog
the Wyoming Kid
Yango the Super-Ape

This time, the list will be beaten!!!

/ola



the4thpip
Member
posted November 25, 2001 10:47 AM

Astralad:

Joseph Silver works as a scientist in a dream-research facility in Metropolis.

Although he has a brilliant career, he is deeply unsatisfied because he is ugly and lacks all social skills. He thinks back to his childhood in Smallville when he was called "Mr. Inferiority Complex". He is deeply jealous of "the other mother's boy" in his class, Clark Kent, who made it to be a popular anchor man on television.

Joe Silver decides to use his years of research to turn his life around and tries out his invention of a machine that allows his astral body to travel back in time and possess his teenage body to give his younger self some badly needed self-confidence.

It soon becomes clear that while the older Silver possesses Joey's body, he is more than a mere human: He easily tosses two bullies halfway through the gym.

During a concert of up and coming beat band The Doodles, Joey makes his first appearance as Astralad, having used his powers to turn himself into a handsome, athletic stud with a manly mane of black hair and black and purple costume.

Superboy recognizes his classmate with x-ray vision and uses his super-breath to suck him away from the crowd. He confronts him with his real name (how would Superboy know a nobody? Giving away your secret ID here Kal, tsk tsk), and Astralad replies that he does not intend to keep his identity a secret. He wants all of Smallville to know that Joe Silver is a super hero now. He easily traps Superboy with energy rays from his fingers and tosses him into orbit.

Later, Astralad approaches Lana Lang and tells her he plans to form a super-team with Superboy. Lana says his voice sounds familiar, and Joe takes off his mask and transforms his face back to his normal features. But the girl cannot recognize him, as Superboy uses his heat vision to make the air flicker between them. He then disperses the sound waves to keep Lana from hearing Joey say his name.

Astralad then stops bank robbers from getting away in a balloon, but Superboy steals his thunder by knocking the wind out of him and taking the robbers to the police himself.

After Superboy stops Joe once more of revealing his other ID, he confronts Astralad and explains to him how dangerous it could be for him and his family to just come out like that. Astralad thinks he is just jealous and flies off.

Astralad breaks through the Kent's roof and kidnaps Clark. He says he wants to use him as a bargain chip in his dispute with Superboy. In a cave outside Smallville, Clark claims to recognize Joe's voice, and Astralad tells him the full story of astral time travel and such.

Clark pretends to lose his temper and knocks Astralad through the cage. Astralad lashes out with energy beams from his eyes, which tear most of Clark's street clothes off and reveal his Superboy costume. He convinces Astralad that his subconsciousness must have influenced his dream powers to turn Clark into Superboy to show him the error of his ways.

Astralad realizes that it's wrong to want to change the past and leaves Joey's body to travel back to modern day Metropolis, where he looks up an old Smallville newspaper in which Superboy speculates that the suddenly-departed Astralad must have been an alien.

He sees a Clark Kent billboard and muses that Clark as a super hero is even more ridiculous than he himself...



outpost2
Member
posted November 25, 2001 10:18 PM

STARMAN

Alter Ego: Bruce Wayne, alias Batman
Occupation: Millionaire Socialite
Known Relatives: Thomas Wayne (father, deceased); Martha Wayne (mother, deceased); Richard "Dick" Grayson (legal ward)
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Gotham City (Earth-One)
First Appearance: Detective Comics #247 (September 1957)
Height: 6 ft. 2 in.
Weight: 210 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Black

History: Renegade scientist, Professor Milo, gathers three members of the underworld in his secret laboratory to discuss the problem of Batman. He explains that others have failed at crime because of the caped crusader, but believes he shall succeed by defeating Batman through a phobia. After many years of research, he has developed a substance so precious it can only be used once, a substance that will make Batman helpless against their march of crime.

The next day, at a charity benefit, where Batman is an honored guest, Milo paints the phobia liquid on a spotlight lens which mimics the bat-signal. When Batman is introduced, Milo's henchman projects the image of the bat into Batman's eyes. Batman is stunned by the bright light, begins to feel a little dizzy, and excuses himself as he is helped off-stage by his partner, Robin. The heroes return to their home and their civilian identities of Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson.

That night, when Batman and Robin are summoned with the real bat-signal, Bruce finds he cannot look at his own bat emblem. He rips the emblem off and dons his costume. When they reach the Batmobile, Batman finds he cannot enter it, and the duo are forced to tend to the crime on foot. Shortly, at the Gotham Art Museum, Batman and Robin confront three art thieves. When Batman pulls out one of his batarangs, he goes into a sudden panic, and the criminals escape with the stolen artwork. The thieves report back to Professor Milo that the phobia works.

The following night, Batman and Robin again answer a call from the police. When Batman corners the criminals on a building rooftop, one of them opens a small box and lets loose a bat. Batman is so panic-stricken, he falls off the edge of the building. Robin saves his partner, but the criminals again escape with their stolen goods.

Later, back at the Batcave, Batman concludes that someone has given him an artificial phobia against bats. In the days that follow, Batman's phobia gets so bad that he is forced to retire. Batman brings Robin to Police Commissioner Gordon's office to inform the police that, from that moment on, Robin will be working with a new partner, Starman. Within an hour, news of Batman's retirement spreads around the world.

The next time the police are faced with a crime they cannot handle, they project a star-signal into the night sky. Starman and Robin arrive at the crime in progress in a hovering Star-Plane. Using their fists and a handful of star-darts, the heroes capture the four thugs and bring them into custody.

Back at their new headquarters, the Star-Loft, Bruce confides in Dick that it won't be long before people guess that Starman is actually Batman, and criminals will begin to use his bat phobia against him once more. When Dick asks if there are cures for phobias, Bruce explains that the person can be made to realize that there's nothing to fear, but it usually takes time. Before he can react, Dick straps Bruce to a chair and rolls out a news reel projector. Dick begins showing films of the exploits of Batman, deafening himself to Bruce's pleas to stop. As scene after scene flashes before him, Bruce begins to relax. Elsewhere, Professor Milo proclaims to his men that it is obvious that Starman is really Batman in another costume. Milo states that he has come up with a bat-scare that will finish Batman for good.

Later that night, as bandits make off with a factory payroll, Starman and Robin arrive. The criminals are prepared, and unleash a huge bat-shaped balloon. Instead of being frightened, as expected, Starman and Robin jump aboard the bat-balloon and ride it towards the thieves. Two are captured immediately. Starman then captures the remaining two who are fleeing by slashing the floating balloon with a stararang. Starman quickly learns of Professor Milo's whereabouts from his prisoners. He soon arrives at the secret lab, confronting Milo. The cunning scientist quickly holds up a paper cutout of a bat, believing it will stop his attacker, but Starman merely punches through it and into Milo's jaw. Starman then reveals his Batman costume underneath, showing that the phobia no longer has any effect. The world soon learns that Batman is back.

Weapons and Powers: Bruce Wayne has been trained in numerous fighting techniques and is an expert in hand-to-hand combat. He is a man of great intelligence and ingenuity and, as Batman, is renowned for his superior detective skills. As Starman, he flew a robot controlled Star-Plane, which was kept at it's secret hanger, the Star-Loft. Among other weapons, Starman wielded star-darts and the stararang.

Comments: This portion of Batman's history was eliminated by the events of the Crisis on Infinite Earths. In the revised history, a hero resembling the one described above was active for a year and a day, from January 1951 to January 1952. This hero was, in fact, two separate individuals: Dr. Charles McNider, a.k.a. Dr. Mid-Nite, and David Knight, the time-traveling son of the original Starman.

Charles McNider replaced Ted Knight, the original Starman, who had suffered a mental breakdown, from January 1951 to early December 1951. When David Knight, the fifth Starman, was snatched from the moment just prior to his death and transported through time to early December 1951, he was trained by McNider as his replacement. David was active from December 1951 to January 2nd 1952, and was believed by the general public to be the same Starman that had been fighting crime for the last eleven months.

The post-Crisis Starman was first mentioned in Starman [second series] #2 (December 1994), made a cameo appearance in Starman Secret Files #1 (April 1998), and made his first full appearance in Starman 80-Page Giant #1 (Jan 1999).



outpost2
Member
posted November 25, 2001 10:52 PM

Guys, I went through the archived ObscureDCU and ObscureBatman threads and came up with an alphabetical list of what's been covered thus far.

There are 302 in the ObscureDCU list (including those not yet covered), and 104 in the ObscureBatman list. There's around 78 more to go in the ObscureDCU list, counting brief entries that I'd personally like to see expanded upon (like the three Aquagirl entries, which only listed secret identities and first appearances).

To save space, I'll post the list the next time we need a "bump".


Here are some links to scans of some of the heroes covered in Round IV.
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/starman1957.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/atlasthetitan.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/atlasbykirby.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/atlas1960s.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/herculesunbound.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/hercules1960s.jpg
http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/samson1960s.jpg



Hellstone
Member
posted November 26, 2001 05:04 PM

Thanks for Starman 1957 and Astralad.

Under production from the Hellstone corner: The Terrific Whatzit, Blue Jay and Silver Sorceress, and a biography of Stanley and his Monster.

/ola



datalore
Member
posted November 27, 2001 08:40 AM

Always great to see this thread back...

...the Homeless Avenger?

Wasn't he from VIGILANTE, around #48-49?



cmkeller
Member
posted November 28, 2001 12:25 PM

The Tornado Twins:

Pre-Zero Hour

Don and Dawn Allen, the Tornado Twins, are the twin children of Barry Allen, the twentieth-century hero known as the Flash, who lived with his wife Iris West in the thirtieth century for the last month of his life. Although the two did not naturally manifest the speed powers that their father had, the potential was within their genes, and it was artificially unlocked for one day in 2979, which had been dedicated to the Flash's memory. On that day, the Allens, calling themselves the Tornado Twins, beat the Legion to many emergencies, upstaging them, which led to a little animosity for a brief while until they revealed that they were the Flash's children, celebrating Flash Day, and that they had no intention of making a career out of super-heroism (ADVENTURE COMICS # 373). They became friends with the Legion, even being invited to the wedding of Duo Damsel and Bouncing Boy (SUPERBOY (1st series) # 200).

In 2986, they were targeted for murder by Professor Ivo, an enemy of their father from his days as a member of the Justice League of America, but were saved by the Legionnaires (LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES (2nd series) ANNUAL # 1).

In 2994, their mother wrote a series of articles exposing the Dominators' covert domination of Earth and campaign to wipe out former members of the Legion of Super-Heroes. In revenge, and to prevent others from doing the same, the Dominators fabricated evidence that implicated the twins in the explosion of the Quebec fusion powersphere and had them executed for the crime (LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES (3rd series) # 17). Dawn died unmarried; Don was survived by his wife, Carmen Johnson, and his son Barry II, or "Bart", who had inherited his grandfather's super-speed and was brought by his grandmother to the twentieth century, where he became the super-hero Impulse.

Post-Zero Hour

One of the greatest heroes of the twentieth century was Barry Allen, the second Flash, but toward the end of his career, he was put on trial for the murder of the murderer of his first wife, Iris West Allen. What he hadn't known at the time was that Iris was actually a native of the thirtieth century, and that her life had been saved by her parents employing a "psychic transplant" to bring her back to her home era. As the Flash's trial drew to a close, she traveled through time and brought him to the thirtieth century as well, where they lived in wedded bliss...for a month, before he was snatched from there in the middle of the Crisis on Infinite Earths by a villain called the Anti-Monitor and he died trying to stop the Anti-Monitor's schemes. But Barry didn't leave Iris alone. When he disappeared, she was pregnant with his twin children, who she named Don and Dawn.

Don and Dawn Allen inherited their father's super-speed abilities, but Iris managed to keep this a secret while she raised them, because the xenophobia that preceded the founding of the United Planets had been running rampant, and anyone with metahuman powers risked being mistaken for an alien and being lynched. This, in fact, happened to Wally West, their father's successor as Flash, when, while he was lost in time, he crossed their paths. They saved him from such a lynching, keeping their identities secret, and began to entertain the possiblitiy of using their powers to help others out after all (FLASH (2nd series) # 114). Several years later, they helped out a multitude of speedsters from the third millennium to battle Cobalt Blue (FLASH (2nd series) # 146-149). Eventually they got married and had children. Don married Meloni Thawne, the daughter of Earth's President Thawne, who has a long-standing vendetta against the Allen family (IMPULSE # 25). They had a son, Bart (later known as Impulse) and Dawn (whose last name was now Ognats) bore a daughter, Jenni (later to become the Legionnaire XS). Don and Dawn were drawn into the super-hero life when a family friend who knew their secret told them about a Dominator outpost where mutation experiments were performed on human beings. The twins put on costumes, called themselves the "Tornado Twins" and set out to stop them. They freed the prisoners, but were killed by the Dominators shortly afterward (LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES (3rd series) ANNUAL # 6), as the Dominators' presence was part of an elaborate plot by President Thawne to kill them (IMPULSE # 25).

Chaim Mattis Keller



outpost2
Member
posted December 01, 2001 04:06 PM

Sgt. Gorilla
Star Spangled War Stories [2nd series] #126
"You Can't Pin A Medal On A Gorilla"

Paraphrased from an article by Scott Shaw, a CBR staff writer
( reference http://www.comicbookresources.com/ )

Marine Corporal Pinky Donovan and his pet gorilla Charlie entertain the U.S. troops fighting in World War II by performing in USO shows. The duo are split up when Pinky is called back to active service. They are unexpectedly reunited when Charlie saves Pinky during a beach assault against the Japanese forces. When the gorilla continues to aid Pinky and his men, their Commanding Officer becomes so irritated that he busts Pinky down to the rank of Private. However, when Charlie later plays a pivotal role in neutralizing the enemy, he is decorated with a mock medal and given the honorary title of "Sgt. Gorilla".



outpost2
Member
posted December 01, 2001 04:11 PM

Here's that alphabetical list I mentioned earlier. 227 out of 306 completed, 79 more to go. Look at the follow-up post to see which ones still need to be covered.

Obscure DCU Characters Index

A1. Adam Strange II
A2. the Adventurers' Club and Nelson Strong
A3. Agent Orange
A4. Amanda Waller
A5. the Ant
A6. Anti-Lad
A7. Apache Chief
A8. Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel)
A9. Aquagirl II (Selena)
A10. Aquagirl III (Tula)
A11. Arcana I (from New Talent Showcase)
A12. Arcana II (from JLA)
A13. Argent
A14. Arizona Ames / Arizona Raines
A15. Armstrong of the Army
A16. the Arrows of Alaska
A17. Arsenal (Nicholas Galtry)
A18. the Assassination Bureau
A19. Astra, Girl of the Future
A20. Astralad
A21. Astro
A22. Atlas II
A23. Atlas III
A24. the Atomic Knight
A25. Automan
A26. Azrael I
A27. the Baffler / Headbanger
A28. the Banshee II (Charlton Comics villain)
A29. the Bat-Knights
A30. the Bat Squad
A31. the Beefeater I & II
A32. Billy the Kid
A33. Binky
A34. Blackmask
A35. Blackrock I - IV
A36. Black Vulcan
A37. Blackwing
A38. BlueJay
A39. Bob Colby and Jim Boone
A40. Bob the Galactic Bum
A41. the Bombardiers
A42. the Bottler
A43. Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun
A44. Cannon and Saber
A45. Captain Incredible
A46. Captain Invincible
A47. Captain Stingaree
A48. Captain Strong
A49. Captain Thunder
A50. the Card Queen
A51. Cat Grant
A52. C.A.W. (The Criminal Alliance of the World)
A53. the Chain Gang War
A54. the Changling I (Erik Razar)
A55. the Changling II (of Krastl)
A56. the Changling III (Gregor Nagy)
A57. the Changling IV (of the Cartel)
A58. the Changling V (Garfield Logan)
A59. Class of 2064
A60. the Clipper I & II
A61. Colonel Future
A62. Conjura
A63. the Council
A64. the Crimson Avenger II (Albert Elwood)
A65. Croak McCraw, the Dead Detective
A66. Crusader
A67. Cryonic Man
A68. the Cyclone Kids
A69. Darius Tiko, the Wizard of Time
A70. Davy Tenzer
A71. the Deep Six
A72. El Diablo (western hero)
A73. Doctor Davis
A74. Doctor-7
A75. El Dorado
A76. El Dragón
A77. the Duke of Deception
A78. the Duke of Oil
A79. Dyno-Man of Sorrta
A80. the Elementals
A81. Element Girl
A82. the Eliminator
A83. the Emerald Eye of Ekron
A84. the Endless One
A85. the Evil Eight
A86. Executrix
A87. the Fargo Kid
A88. the Fire Ghosts
A89. the Fire People
A90. Fireman Farrell and the Firefighters
A91. Firestar
A92. Flashback / Deja Vu
A93. the Flash Dynasty
A94. the Flying Boots
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time
A96. Foley of the Fighting Fifth
A97. the Forever Man
A98. the Frogmen
A99. Gadgeteer
A100. Gangbusters
A101. Godiva
A102. the Golden Eagle
A103. Golden Gladiator
A104. the Gorilla Wonders of the Diamond
A105. the Great Super-Star Game
A106. the Green Arrows of the World
A107. the Green Glob
A108. Grockk, the Devil's Son
A109. Gudra the Valkyrie
A110. the Hacker Files
A111. Halk Kar
A112. Her Highness and Silk
A113. Hercules I
A114. Hercules II
A115. the Homeless Avenger
A116. Hoppy the Marvel Bunny
A117. Human Cannonball
A118. the Human Hurricane (Mitch Anderson)
A119. Huntress I (Paula Brooks)
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania
A121. Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus
A122. Ibis the Invincible
A123. the Image I (Angus Calhoun)
A124. the Image II (Quality Comics villain)
A125. the Image III (Charlton Comics villain)
A126. the Image IIIA (Clay Kendall)
A127. the Image IV (an Agent of Order)
A128. the Inferior Five
A129. the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron
A130. Interplanetary Insurance, Inc.
A131. Isis
A132. Jan Vern, Interplanetary Agent
A133. Jason's Quest
A134. Jefferson Pierce / Black Lightning
A135. Jemm, Son of Saturn
A136. Jero and Halk
A137. Jim Aparo of Earth-One
A138. Jim Corrigan of Earth-One
A139. Jody
A140. Jonna Crisp
A141. Joshua
A142. Kings of the Wild
A143. Kit Colby, Girl Sheriff
A144. the Knights of the Galaxy
A145. Kolossal Kate
A146. Kong the Untamed
A147. Lady Cop
A148. Lady Quark II
A149. Lando, Man of Magic
A150. the Legion of the Weird
A151. the Lightning Master
A152. the Liquidator
A153. Little Miss Redhead
A154. the Luck League
A155. the Luck Lords
A156. Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching
A157. the Mad Maestro
A158. Mad Mod Witch / the Fashion Thing
A159. Manhunters Around the World
A160. the Maniaks
A161. Mark Merlin
A162. Marsboy
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
A164. Masked Ranger
A165. the Master Electrician
A166. the Maze
A167. the Mercenaries
A168. Mighty Boy and Mighty Dog of Zumoor
A169. Mighty Man
A170. Mindgrabber Kid / Mind Eater
A171. Minstrel Maverick
A172. Miss Arrowette
A173. Miss X
A174. Mister Banjo
A175. Mister E
A176. Mister Originality
A177. Mopee
A178. Mystek
A179. Nadir, Master of Magic
A180. Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia
A181. the New Guardians
A182. Nightmaster
A183. Nightwolf
A184. Nimrod the Hunter
A185. Nubia
A186. the Nuclear Family
A187. the Odd Man
A188. O.G.R.E. (the Organization for General Revenge and Enslavement)
A189. One Man Meltdown / Cyclotronic Man / Bag O´Bones
A190. O-Sensei
A191. the Outlaw
A192. the Overland Coach
A193. Owlwoman
A194. Pandora Pan
A195. Paragon
A196. Petronius
A197. the Planeteers
A198. Power Elite
A199. Power Lad
A200. Power-Boy of the asteroid Juno
A201. Power-Man, King of Outer-Space
A202. Pow-Wow Smith I & II
A203. Primal Force
A204. Prince Ra-Man
A205. the Printer's Devil
A206. Professor Brainstorm
A207. Professor Menace / the Robot Master
A208. Proletariat
A209. Pulsar
A210. Queen Arrow
A211. the Queen Bee (Marcia Monroe)
A212. Ramulus / Nightshade I
A213. the Redeemer
A214. the original Red Tornado
A215. Rima the Jungle Girl
A216. Rodeo Rick
A217. Rose and Thorn (Silver Age)
A218. the Roving Ranger
A219. S-64
A220. Samson
A221. Samuel Lane
A222. Samurai
A223. Scarth
A224. Secret Agent Woman
A225. Seraph
A226. Sgt. Gorilla
A227. Sgt. Rock family tree
A228. Shadowstryke
A229. Shark Wilson
A230. Sierra Smith
A231. Silver Fog I - III
A232. Silver Sorceress
A233. the Sino-Supermen
A234. the Sizematic Twins
A235. Skull and Bones
A236. Sky Dogs
A237. Slam Bradley
A238. the Smashing Sportsman
A239. Snafu
A240. Snapper Carr's betrayal of the JLA
A241. Sonik
A242. the Space Rangers
A243. Space Voyagers
A244. Split
A245. Squire Shade
A246. SR-12
A247. Stanley and his Monster
A248. Starfire (sword & sorcery)
A249. Starhunters
A250. the Starman Dynasty
A251. the Starman of 1957
A252. Sterling Silversmith
A253. the Suicide Squadron
A254. Sunburst
A255. Super-Chief
A256. Super-Duper
A257. Super-Hip
A258. the Superman Dynasty
A259. Super-Turtle
A260. Superwoman (Kristen Wells)
A261. Superwoman (Luma Lynai of Staryl)
A262. Swashbuckler
A263. Swing with Scooter
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda
A265. Tailgunner Jo
A266. the Tarantula (Jerry Lewis)
A267. Ted and Teri Trapper
A268. Templar Knight
A269. Terra-Man
A270. the Terrific Whatzit (McSnurtle the Turtle)
A271. The-Thing-That-Cannot-Die
A272. the Third Archer (Andre Reynard)
A273. the Three Aces
A274. Thriller
A275. Thunderlord
A276. Tiger-Man (Desmond Farr)
A277. the Timeless Ones
A278. Tim Trench
A279. the T.N.T. Trio
A280. Tom Sparks, Boy Inventor
A281. the Tornado Twins
A282. Toyman (Bronze Age)
A283. Tracey Thompson
A284. Two-Gun Lil
A285. Ubu
A286. Ultra the Multi-Alien
A287. Ultraa (pre-Crisis)
A288. Ultraa (post-Crisis)
A289. Ur the Caveboy
A290. U.S.S. Stevens
A291. Vartox (pre-Crisis)
A292. Vartox (post-Crisis)
A293. the Viking Commando
A294. Wayne Clifford (Dateline: Frontline)
A295. Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog
A296. Whirlwind
A297. Wild Dog
A298. Willow
A299. Wilson Forbes
A300. the Wonder Twins (pre-Crisis) and Gleek
A301. the Wonder Twins (post-Crisis)
A302. the Wyoming Kid
A303. Xeen Arrow of Dimension Zero
A304. Yango the Super-Ape
A305. the Yellow Peri
A306. Zero-Man



outpost2
Member
posted December 01, 2001 04:14 PM

Obscure characters not covered or covered only briefly. I've included some references to make research a little easier.

A1. Adam Strange II [Mystery In Space #94, #98; Hourman #11]
A7. Apache Chief [The All-New Superfriends Hour 1977 cartoon; DC One Million 80-Page Giant #1,000,000]
A8. Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel) [Adventure Comics #266]
A9. Aquagirl II (Selena) [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #133]
A10. Aquagirl III (Tula) [Aquaman [1st series] #33]
A16. the Arrows of Alaska [Adventure Comics #260]
A19. Astra, Girl of the Future [Sensation Comics #99]
A26. Azrael I [Tales Of The Teen Titans #52]
A30. the Bat Squad [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #92]
A31. the Beefeater I & II [Justice League Europe #20]
A35. Blackrock I - IV [Action Comics #458-#459; Superman [1st series] #315, #325-#326; Superman Family#212-#213]
A36. Black Vulcan [The All-New Superfriends Hour 1977 cartoon; DC One Million 80-Page Giant #1,000,000]
A38. BlueJay [Justice League Of America #87]
A43. Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun [Police Comics #2 by Quality Comics]
A45. Captain Incredible [Action Comics #354]
A53. the Chain Gang War [Chain Gang War #1]
A61. Colonel Future [Superman [1st series] #378]
A66. Crusader [Aquaman [1st series] #56]
A72. El Diablo (western hero) [All-Star Western [2nd series] #2]
A75. El Dorado [Superfriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show 1984 cartoon]
A79. Dyno-Man of Sorrta [Superman [1st series] #206]
A82. the Eliminator [Action Comics #379]
A84. the Endless One [Justice League Of America #??]
A91. Firestar [ ?? ]
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time [Firestorm The Nuclear Man #70-71]
A101. Godiva [Super Friends #7]
A103. Golden Gladiator [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #1]
A110. the Hacker Files [The Hacker Files #1]
A115. the Homeless Avenger [Vigilante #48]
A118. the Human Hurricane (Mitch Anderson) [House of Mystery #155]
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania [Action Comics #265]
A121. Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus [Superboy [1st series] #144]
A129. the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron [Adventure Comics #237]
A131. Isis [The Shazam!/Isis Hour 1976 live-action show; Shazam! #25]
A135. Jemm, Son of Saturn [Jemm, Son Of Saturn #1]
A144. the Knights of the Galaxy [Mystery In Space #1]
A145. Kolossal Kate [Flash [1st series] #211]
A149. Lando, Man of Magic [World's Best Comics #1]
A152. the Liquidator [Aquaman [1st series] #38]
A153. Little Miss Redhead [Sensation Comics #72]
A156. Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching [Wonder Woman [1st series] #179]
A162. Marsboy [Superboy [1st series] #14, #16; Adventure Comics #195]
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra [Action Comics #272-#273]
A169. Mighty Man [ ?? ]
A171. Minstrel Maverick [All-American Western #103]
A178. Mystek [Ray [2nd series] #12?-#13?; Justice League Task Force #30-#32]
A179. Nadir, Master of Magic [New Adventure Comics #17]
A180. Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia [Action Comics #354]
A183. Nightwolf [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #323]
A185. Nubia [Wonder Woman [1st series] #204]
A193. Owlwoman [Super Friends #7]
A196. Petronius [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #3]
A197. the Planeteers [Real Fact Comics #16 ?]
A199. Power Lad [Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #45]
A201. Power-Man, King of Outer-Space [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #??]
A209. Pulsar [New Adventures of Superboy #31]
A215. Rima the Jungle Girl [Green Mansions, a novel by William Henry Hudson; Rima, The Jungle Girl #1]
A222. Samurai [The All-New Superfriends Hour 1977 cartoon; Super Powers [3rd series] #1-#4; DC One Million 80-Page Giant #1,000,000]
A225. Seraph [Super Friends #7]
A232. Silver Sorceress [Justice League Of America #87]
A233. the Sino-Supermen [Batman Family #19; Detective Comics #481-#482]
A237. Slam Bradley [Detective Comics #1]
A241. Sonik [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #310]
A243. Space Voyagers [Rima, The Jungle Girl #1]
A247. Stanley and his Monster [Fox And The Crow #95 ?]
A260. Superwoman (Kristen Wells) [DC Comics Presents Annual #2]
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #304-#307]
A270. the Terrific Whatzit (McSnurtle the Turtle) [Funny Stuff #1]
A272. the Third Archer (Andre Reynard) [Adventure Comics #162]
A275. Thunderlord [Super Friends #8]
A276. Tiger-Man (Desmond Farr) [Tales Of The Unexpected #90]
A288. Ultraa (post-Crisis) [Justice League International [Quarterly] #13]
A293. the Viking Commando [All Out War #1]
A295. Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog [Super Friends 1973 cartoon; Super Friends #1]
A297. Wild Dog [Wild Dog #1]
A300. the Wonder Twins (pre-Crisis) and Gleek [The All-New Super Friends Hour 1977 cartoon; Super Friends #7]
A301. the Wonder Twins (post-Crisis) [Extreme Justice #9]
A302. the Wyoming Kid [Western Comics #1]
A304. Yango the Super-Ape [Superboy [1st series] #172]



outpost2
Member
posted December 01, 2001 04:16 PM

And, just for the heck of it, here's the list of the 104 Batman characters covered.

Obscure Batman Characters Index

B1. Ace the Bat-Hound
B2. Alfred
B3. Ali Babble
B4. Amygdala
B5. Arthur Reeves
B6. the Atom Master / the Illusion-Master
B7. Aunt Agatha
B8. Aunt Harriet
B9. Barbara Gordon / Batgirl / Oracle
B10. Batwing
B11. the original Batwoman and Bat-Girl
B12. Black Spider I & II
B13. Blockbuster I
B14. the Bouncer
B15. "Brains" Beldon
B16. the Calculator
B17. Calendar Man
B18. Captain Cutlass
B19. Cat-Man
B20. Cavalier I & II
B21. Chief O´Hara
B22. Clayface II
B23. the Clock
B24. the Clock King (Green Arrow villain)
B25. the Clock King (live tv series)
B26. the Clock King (animated series)
B27. Colonel Blimp
B28. Colonel Sulphur
B29. Crazy-Quilt
B30. the Creeper
B31. Crime Doctor
B32. the Dagger
B33. Detective McGonigle
B34. Dr. Double-X
B35. Doctor Phosphorus
B36. Doctor Tzin-Tzin
B37. the Eagle
B38. the Electrocutioner I - III
B39. the Elemental Man
B40. the Eraser
B41. False Face
B42. 50-50
B43. the Firefly
B44. Flamebird
B45. the Flying Graysons
B46. Frederick Rhino
B47. the Gaucho
B48. the Gentleman Ghost
B49. the Getaway Genius
B50. the Gorilla Boss
B51. the Hellgrammite
B52. Hugo Strange
B53. Johnny Witts
B54. Julia Pennyworth
B55. Killer Croc
B56. Killer Moth
B57. Kite-Man
B58. the Knight and Squire
B59. Lady Lunar
B60. the Legionary
B61. Lightning-Man
B62. Linda Page
B63. Mad Hatter I - V
B64. Man-Bat
B65. Matches Malone
B66. Mirage I & II
B67. Mirror Man
B68. Mister Baffle
B69. Mister Esper
B70. Mister Polka-Dot
B71. Mister Zsasz
B72. the Mole
B73. the Monarch of Menace
B74. the Monk
B75. the Musketeer
B76. the Network
B77. the Night-Thief / Nightslayer
B78. Nocturna
B79. No-Face
B80. the Outsider
B81. Pinhead
B82. the Planet Master I & II
B83. Professor Milo
B84. Ranger
B85. Richard Dragon
B86. Ruby Ryder
B87. the Scarecrow
B88. Shotgun Smith
B89. Silken Spider, Dragonfly, and Tiger Moth
B90. Solly Bean
B91. Spellbinder I & II
B92. the Spook
B93. the Ten-Eyed Man
B94. the Terrible Trio
B95. Tweededee and Tweedledum
B96. Ubu / Lurk / Grind
B97. the Ventriloquist and Scarface
B98. Vernon Jamson
B99. Waxman
B100. the Wayne family tree
B101. Wingman
B102. the Wringer
B103. the Zebra-Man I & II
B104. the Zodiac Master



Richcraft
Member
posted December 02, 2001 01:44 PM

Wendy Harris, Marvin White, and Wonder Dog,
the original Junior Super Friends.

Wendy is the niece of Harvey Harris, the private detective who taught Bruce Wayne (who was wearing the Robin costume to disguise his identity) almost everything he knows. Harvey figured out Bruce's identity before the man died. When Wendy expressed an interest in super-heroics, Bruce had the Hall of Justice built in Gotham City to accomodate her.

Marvin White (no relation to Perry) is the son of Dan White and the original Diana Prince, who sold her identity to Wonder Woman in her first appearance. Somehow Marvin had learned of his mother's connection to Wonder Woman (either by snooping through his mom's diary or by connecting U.N. trouble shooter Diana Prince's uncanny resemblance to his mother--both women are near lookalikes with their glasses on). Wonder Woman had him become a Jr. Super Friend along with Wendy. He named his pet Wonder Dog after the hero.

While Wendy and Marvin had to be saved from the bad guys by the heroes, every once in a while they saved the earth. They were able to defeat the World Beater, who had ambushed literally every super-hero on Earth-One, by talking about the villains that they knew were transformed into the World Beater. They realized that X-rays could weaken him like kryptonite weakened Superman. So they went into disguise in secret suits of armor. The World Beater tried to find out what their hidden weapons were by creating X-rays, thus creating his own downfall.

Check out the Super Friends trade paperback to see how they met the Wondertwins and how they defeated Grax while the JLA and the future Global Guardians were battling his alien monsters.

I had written a proposal to Cartoon Network to work up interest in an origin of the Super Friends movie. In it, Libra is the latest junior super friend who can fly and has gravity powers. She is also the only super-hero on earth since all the others were put into another dimension. She contacts the first four Jr. Friends. Wendy and Marvin show up as Virgo and Sagittarius. Athena gave them a force field belt and gloves that gave Marvin the powers of an archer/centaur. As a reward for their past heroism. Zan and Jayna also return, but since they are also known heroes, they begin to disappear. They quickly change shape and nullify the magic. Wendy has them change into Aquarius and Gemini (water powers and twin duplicating). They rename themselves the Zodiac All-Stars and learn what happened to their mentors.

Alas, they decided to go with the superior Justice League animated series instead. Deep sigh of regret.



outpost2
Member
posted December 07, 2001 10:14 PM

Just finished entries for Space Voyagers and Space Marshal.

Almost done with bios for Rima the Jungle Girl, Apache Chief, Black Vulcan, Samurai, and El Dorado.

After that: The Freedom Brigade, the Human Hurricane, Tiger-Man, and Yango the Super-Ape.

I'd also like to add the following to the list (like there's not enough to tackle already!):
A18+. the Assemblers and the Justifiers [Justice League Of America #87, Justice League Europe #19, Justice League Quarterly #3]
A68+. Cyclotron II [Kenner/Hasbro toy; Super Powers [3rd series] #1-#4]
A73+. Doctor Mist [Wisdom's Daughter, a novel by H. Rider Haggard; Super Friends #12; DC Comics Presents #46; Secret Origins [2nd ongoing series] #27]
A97+. the Freedom Brigade (got this covered)
A103+. Golden Pharaoh [Kenner/Hasbro toy; Super Powers [3rd series] #1-#4]
A131+. Jack B. Quick / Johnny Quick II / Captain Speed [Justice League Of America #87, Justice League Europe #16, Justice League #2]
A131++. Jack O'Lantern I - III [Super Friends #8; Justice League Europe Annual #1; Justice League International Quarterly #14]
A141+. the Justice Experience [Chase #6; Martian Manhunter [2nd series] #17,20,22,36]
A241+. Space Marshal (got this covered too)
A293+. Wandjina [Justice League Of America #87]



outpost2
Member
posted December 07, 2001 10:15 PM

SPACE VOYAGERS
Crew Members: Bartt, Armando, Melong, and Nolan.

Appearances: RIMA, THE JUNGLE GIRL #1 (Apr-May 1974), #2 (June-July 1974), #3 (Aug-Sep 1974), #4 (Oct-Nov 1974), #5 (Dec 74-Jan 75).

Episode #1 (part one) : The Space Voyagers are four young explorers named Bartt, Armando, Melong, and Nolan. While roving the galaxy in their starship, they detect a planet that looks inhabited. The ship hovers overhead while the crew descends to the surface. The teens discover human footprints, which they follow. They come across an old man who is being attacked by a large, flying insect. After firing their weapons to distract the creature, they get the old man to safety. He brings them to a marble mausoleum, where the teens discover four dead figures. Upon closer examination, they realize the figures look just like them!

Episode #1 (part two) : An alien creature, resembling a giant brain, contacts the Space Voyagers telepathically, explaining that the figures they are observing are just an illusion. The humans on the creature's own planet had perished during a planetary famine, so it needs the Voyagers to repair it's machines. The creature then wipes their memories of everything it had just explained, then places a suggestion in their minds to travel to it's world. When the teens arrive, the creature immobilizes them and grafts their human traits onto it's machines. The machines rebel and turn on their master, destroying it. The creature had not considered that the grafting process would also transfer the human spirit of freedom into the machines.

Episode #2 (origin) : Four teenagers on a distant planetoid decide to leave their world, so they go to the forbidden area and begin preparing a spaceship. Bartt will be the commander, Armando will handle engineering, Melong will be the navigator, and Nolan will be in charge of weapons. Bartt's mother arrives with some of the other parents. She reminds them that it is forbidden to leave their planetoid under any circumstances. For trespassing on the forbidden site, the teens must answer to the Elders. When they are brought before the Elders, the youths are reminded that many, many years earlier, their people had lived on Earth. War, pollution, and famine were devastating the planet. There was no hiding place, so their people exiled themselves, searching until they discovered the asteroid that is now their home. The teens explain that they need to choose their own lives. The Elders consider their words, and agree. Soon after the Space Voyagers blast off into space, they receive an SOS from a star cluster in C-416-038. The Voyagers save the inhabitants of the planetoid Arctus, but are forced to leave immediately afterward when they realize that contact with the natives would be deadly to them.

Episode #3 : The Space Voyagers set foot on a new planet, and are surprised to find statues of themselves there. They are attacked and captured by a crowd of humans, who all look exactly like they do. It is clear that this world is not Earth, yet they see the ruins of Yankee Stadium. The Voyagers conclude that they have landed on a parallel Earth. The natives tell them that they won't be deceived by the teens. They claim the Space Voyagers first came to their planet centuries earlier, and that the statues were built in their honor. Then, an unexpected nuclear attack from an outer galactian invader devastated their world. The alternate Voyagers' spaceship had been protected in it's hanger, a mile below the planet's surface. These Voyagers had told the natives that they would search outer space until they found a safe planet to recolonize. They never returned. When the planet continued to deteriorate, the natives blamed the Voyagers for their misery. Their forefathers insisted that everyone fashion themselves in their enemy's image, the image of treachery. The teens blast themselves free and, in the struggle, the natives collapse. The Voyagers discover that the natives were actually living skeletons, wearing masks to cover their rotting faces.

Episode #4 : The Space Voyagers land on an alien planet and encounter intelligent ant-people. The creatures chase them, intending to use them for food. The teens stumble into a huge glass-enclosed subterranean cavern filled with eggs. When the eggs begin to hatch, the teens blast them. They run back to their spaceship and escape.



outpost2
Member
posted December 07, 2001 10:17 PM

SPACE MARSHAL
Real Name: Linc Wade

Appearances: RIMA, THE JUNGLE GIRL #7 (Apr-May 1975).

Linc Wade, LW-451, soldier of fortune and space prospector, toils in the soil of deserted planetoid called Astra 41. When he hears a sound behind him, Wade incorrectly believes it is a bushwhacker out to steal his claim. With razor-sharp reflexes, Wade turns and fires his hi-velocity star gun, striking the stranger with a force of 20,000 volts of raw electricity. The dying man tells Wade he has been lost for days, and was only looking for some water. He wasn't even carrying a gun. The man gives Wade a photo of his family, and asks that Wade tell his wife that he tried for the kids. When the man dies, Wade calls the Galaxy Consul Patrol to report the killing.

A short time later, somewhere in the Earth's solar system, at a quorum meeting at the Galaxy Consul HQ, Wade faces sentencing. Because of the wars that ravaged the solar system in the past, violence has been outlawed. The penalty for illegal killing is death. However, because he voluntarily admitted his guilt, Wade is given the opportunity to expiate his crime. He will be trained to be a Space Marshal, on special assignment. His role will be to battle every form of violence which may threaten the peace in the most remote reaches of the galaxy. Wade gratefully accepts.

After many months of grueling training, Wade finally graduates. He is now qualified to kill, but only to safeguard peace. In addition to his own self-control, he will be monitored constantly, for he cannot be permitted to make even one mistake. Two days later, at the launch pad, Wade is introduced to his Saturnian deputy, Katto. Their first mission: to check out a disturbance on Asteroid 117, SM-33.



IceHotel
Member
posted December 12, 2001 03:51 PM

I always wanted to see the Silver Banshee in a comic. I'd only seen her in WHO'S WHO, and so I drew my own comics w/ her in them (I was too young to understand copyright laws), and I finally saw her in the latest WONDER WOMAN ish. Unfortunately, Black Canary kicks her ass in 2 blocks, but it was still nice.



IceHotel
Member
posted December 12, 2001 03:53 PM

Another character I drew out of WHO'S WHO but never saw was Briar Thorn, I don't even know who's villian he was (Silver Banshee was Superman's), and I probably gave him powers he didn't own, but oh well.



outpost2
Member
posted December 15, 2001 09:14 PM

The following seven entries are all related to the Super Friends television cartoon and Super Powers action figures line. I started my research with my own notes from 1977 (as a kid, I actually wrote down the dates that each episode of that season first aired, don't ask me why!) and with an incomplete book called Hanna-Barbera's World Of Super Adventure. From there, I visited various Super Friends web sites. There were some minor discrepancies between each, and only one that I recall mentioned the cartoons from 1980 through 1983. I then went through the online database of the U.S. Copyright Office to see what else I could uncover. The records were incomplete, but very useful. Finally, I extracted relevant information from the third Super Powers comic book mini-series, which was based on the Kenner action figure line. The following is a summary of what I discovered.


BLACK VULCAN
Secret identity: Unrevealed.
First appeared: THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR Episode 1/4 "Whirlpool" (First aired: Sep 10th, 1977).
Television appearances: Episodes of THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1977), CHALLENGE OF THE SUPERFRIENDS (1978), THE SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1980), THE SUPER FRIENDS (1981), SUPERFRIENDS: THE LEGENDARY SUPER POWERS SHOW (1984).
Comic book appearances: DC ONE MILLION 80-PAGE GIANT #1,000,000 (Aug 1999).
Action figures: None.
Origin revealed: Never.
Powers: Black Vulcan can generate lightning bolts from his body and has the ability to fly.


APACHE CHIEF
Secret identity: Unrevealed.
First appeared: THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR Episode 2/4 "The Antidote" (First aired: Sep 17th, 1977).
Television appearances: Episodes of THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1977), CHALLENGE OF THE SUPERFRIENDS (1978), THE SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1980), THE SUPER FRIENDS (1981), SUPERFRIENDS: THE LEGENDARY SUPER POWERS SHOW (1984).
Comic book appearances: DC ONE MILLION 80-PAGE GIANT #1,000,000 (Aug 1999).
Action figures: None.
Origin revealed: CHALLENGE OF THE SUPERFRIENDS Episode 16/2? "History Of Doom" (First aired: Dec 23rd, 1978?).
The origin of Apache Chief: An Indian brave is confronted by a grizzly bear. His father quickly gives him a magic powder. When the brave speaks the magic word "Inuck-Ch-uck"?, he is transformed into a giant who easily deals with the grizzly. A woman, who had witnessed the amazing events, steals the magic powder away from the father. She sprinkles herself with it and becomes a giant as well, albeit an evil one, calling herself Giganta.
Powers: Apache Chief has superior tracking skills and the power to grow into a 50 foot giant.


SAMURAI
Secret identity: Toshio Eto.
First appeared: THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR Episode 8/4 "Volcano" (First aired: Oct 29th, 1977).
Television appearances: Episodes of THE ALL-NEW SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1977), CHALLENGE OF THE SUPERFRIENDS (1978), THE SUPER FRIENDS HOUR (1980), THE SUPER FRIENDS (1981), SUPERFRIENDS: THE LEGENDARY SUPER POWERS SHOW (1984), THE SUPER POWERS TEAM: GALACTIC GUARDIANS (1985).
Comic book appearances: SUPER POWERS [third series] #1 (Sep 1986) - #4 (Dec 1986); DC ONE MILLION 80-PAGE GIANT #1,000,000 (Aug 1999).
Action figures: SUPER POWERS ACTION FIGURES, SERIES 3 (1986).
Origin revealed: SUPER POWERS [third series] #2 (Oct 1986).
The origin of Samurai: After the overthrow of Darkseid, Orion and Mr. Miracle attempt to maintain the peace on Apokolips. Concerned that they may need help, the heroes enlist the scientist Kronar to develop a means of creating more heroes. He comes up with Omega Energy, a force loosely related to the Omega Effect. When applied to humans with the proper genetic structure, it produces radical changes in their bodies, resulting in the release of latent energy inherent in all beings. For his first trial of "Project Super-Hero", Kronar chooses two Earth subjects. One of the subjects is Japanese history professor, Toshio Eto, who is struck by the energy in Hokkaido, Japan. The next day, the transformed Eto appears in Metropolis as Samurai, along with the other hero, the Golden Pharaoh. Both are driven temporarily mad by the shock, but are soon subdued by the Super Powers Team. Samurai joins the heroes against the threat of Darkseid.
Powers: Samurai possesses martial arts skills, can manipulate the wind, is able to fly, and can become invisible.


EL DORADO
Secret identity: Unrevealed.
First appeared: THE SUPER FRIENDS Episode 2?/3? "Alien Mummy" (First aired: Nov 14th, 1981?).
Television appearances: Episodes of THE SUPER FRIENDS (1981), SUPERFRIENDS: THE LEGENDARY SUPER POWERS SHOW (1984), THE SUPER POWERS TEAM: GALACTIC GUARDIANS (1985).
Comic book appearances: None.
Action figures: None.
Origin revealed: Never.
Powers: El Dorado has the ability to read minds and create illusions. His red cape also grants him the power to teleport anywhere he wishes.


THE GOLDEN PHARAOH
Secret identity: Ashley Halberstam.
First appeared: SUPER POWERS ACTION FIGURES, SERIES 3 (1986).
Television appearances: None.
Comic book appearances: SUPER POWERS [third series] #1 (Sep 1986) - #4 (Dec 1986).
Action figures: SUPER POWERS ACTION FIGURES, SERIES 3 (1986).
Origin revealed: SUPER POWERS [third series] #2 (Oct 1986).
The origin of Golden Pharaoh: After the overthrow of Darkseid, Orion and Mr. Miracle attempt to maintain the peace on Apokolips. Concerned that they may need help, the heroes enlist the scientist Kronar to develop a means of creating more heroes. He comes up with Omega Energy, a force loosely related to the Omega Effect. When applied to humans with the proper genetic structure, it produces radical changes in their bodies, resulting in the release of latent energy inherent in all beings. For his first trial of "Project Super-Hero", Kronar chooses two Earth subjects. One of the subjects is British archeologist, Ashley Halberstam, who is struck by the energy in Giza, Egypt. The next day, the transformed Halberstam appears in Metropolis as the Golden Pharaoh, along with the other hero, Samurai. Both are driven temporarily mad by the shock, but are soon subdued by the Super Powers Team. The Golden Pharaoh joins the heroes against the threat of Darkseid.
Powers: The Golden Pharaoh wields a magical staff, which generates solid pyramid pulses. He also has a golden aura, which protects him from harm. The Golden Pharaoh must periodically recharge himself with the mystical energy from a pyramid.


CYCLOTRON
Secret identity: An android.
First appeared: SUPER POWERS ACTION FIGURES, SERIES 3 (1986).
Television appearances: None.
Comic book appearances: SUPER POWERS [third series] #1 (Sep 1986) - #4 (Dec 1986).
Action figures: SUPER POWERS ACTION FIGURES, SERIES 3 (1986).
Origin revealed: SUPER POWERS [third series] #2 (Oct 1986).
The origin of Cyclotron: Cyclotron is an android created by Superman to store and maintain data. He aids the Super Powers Team in their fight against evil.
Powers: Cyclotron is programmed with tremendous amounts of information, including all known data on Earth's super-heroes and super-villains.


JANUS, SON OF JUPITER
Secret identity: Darkseid.
First appeared: SUPER POWERS [third series] #3 (Nov 1986).
Television appearances: None.
Comic book appearances: SUPER POWERS [third series] #3 (Nov 1986) - #4 (Dec 1986).
Action figures: None.
Origin revealed: SUPER POWERS [third series] #3 (Nov 1986).
The origin of Janus, Son of Jupiter: Darkseid, the deposed ruler of Apokolips, comes to Earth and locates the scientist Kronar. Darkseid forces the scientist to restore his former might. Kronar first bathes him with Alpha Energy, which temporarily restores some of Darkseid's power. Kronar explains that Darkseid will need weeks of treatments of Omega Energy for total restoration. Darkseid kills Kronar, then adopts the costumed identity of Janus, Son of Jupiter. The evil dictator tracks down and saves the Super Powers Team from a threat he had secretly created, then convinces them that he is another hero created by Kronar. The Super Powers Team takes Janus with them to Apokolips, where the heroes eventually bring temporary stability. Darkseid, his immediate plans foiled, approaches Orion as Janus and asks if he could remain on Apokolips to aid in the fight against the forces of evil. Orion gladly accepts, unwittingly giving Darkseid the opportunity he will need to regain his throne.
Powers: Janus possesses great strength and the ability to fly. He wields an indestructible shield and a high-tech mace. As Janus, Darkseid appears as a handsome, blonde human.



outpost2
Member
posted December 19, 2001 12:29 AM

RIMA THE JUNGLE GIRL


Rima (the novel) :

GREEN MANSIONS: A ROMANCE OF THE TROPICAL FOREST (W.H. Hudson, 1904)

Published in 1904, William Henry Hudson's novel "Green Mansions" tells the story of Rima, who is discovered in the jungles of British Guiana by Abel Guevez de Argensola. Running from a failed attempt to overthrow the government during the Venezuelan Revolution, Abel makes his way through the wilderness surrounding the Orinoco river, until he reaches the forests near the mountain of Ytaioa. He befriends the natives there and listens to their stories about a mysterious region of jungle inhabited by an evil spirit called the "daughter of Didi". Abel investigates and is lured into the jungle by the mysterious call of an unseen bird. He follows the haunting sound deeper and deeper into the forest until he eventually discovers the source: a beautiful young girl named Rima, who has learned to mimic the sounds of the jungle birds. Abel soon learns that, in order to protect her beloved birds and animals, Rima had driven the natives from their hunting ground by preying upon their superstitious fears. Over time, Abel and Rima fall deeply in love. Abel tries to help Rima find her people, but they discover that she is the last of her kind. Rima is eventually burned to death by some of the jungle's natives, and Abel goes mad. He wanders the jungle, eventually recovering his composure when he reaches Georgetown. Through his relationship to her, Abel experienced the greatest joy and the darkest despair.


Rima (the movie) :

GREEN MANSIONS (MGM-United Artists, 1959)

Audrey Hepburn plays Rima, a jungle girl, in this adaptation of the W.H. Hudson novel. Anthony Perkins plays Abel, the son of an executed South American politician. When Abel travels to the jungle in search of gold to fund his desire for revenge, he meets the native Indians and soon falls in love with Rima the Bird Girl. Henry Silva plays the corrupt son of the Indian chief and Lee J. Cobb plays Rima's grandfather.


Rima (the comic book) :

RIMA, THE JUNGLE GIRL #1 (Apr-May 1974) - #7 (Apr-May 1975),
published by National Periodicals Publications (DC Comics, Inc.)

Issue #1: A man named Abel stumbles through the jungles of South America. Six months earlier, he had found himself in the middle of the Venezuelan Revolution, on the streets of Caracas. He was fighting alongside the rebels, against the military regime, but the revolt was put down. Sorely wounded, he managed to escape capture. Weak from loss of blood, he sought safety in the jungle. He followed the shores of the Orinoco river upstream, where civilization came to an abrupt halt. Rumors were often told of tribes who adorned themselves with gold and jewels. These treasures, he decided, could turn the tide of the revolution.

Days pass before Abel locates a village. He finds no gold there, but is befriended by the natives and decides to remain. When he asks what lies beyond the mountain rise, he is told the region is tabu, an evil place. The next day, just before dawn, Abel makes his way into the forest. He eventually arrives at the base of a large, old tree, where he hears the enchanting song of an unseen bird. He senses that he is being watched. He later returns to the village. The natives tell him of a witch who can change form. They say that some of their people have ventured to the tabu place, never to return. However, Abel can not be dissuaded and, the next morning, he enters the jungle once more.

When he again reaches the old tree, he is approached by a beautiful white-haired, fair-skinned jungle girl. She begins to sing songs like one of the jungle birds. She playfully prances through the forest, and he follows. Abel then spots a bushmaster snake near her feet. He tries to save her, but is bitten himself. When he faints from the poison, the strange girl brings Abel to a hut, where he is cared for by an old man. When Abel awakens, the old man introduces himself as Nuflo, grandfather of Rima the jungle girl.

Issue #2: At night, while Nuflo sleeps, Abel makes his way back to the old tree, searching for Rima. He is cornered by a fierce jaguar. Abel watches in amazement as Rima appears and begins to pet her feline friend. After sending the creature away, Rima tells Abel that, many, many years earlier, after her mother had died, her grandfather Nuflo brought her into the forest to live. The jungle became her whole world. She is friends with all the beasts, the birds, and the insects. She even uses the jungle spider's web to make her dress.

Later, Abel wakes from his sleep to see Nuflo leaving the hut. He follows and finds Nuflo eating meat. Nuflo invites Abel to join him. He explains that Rima would not tolerate such a thing, so he must be secretive. He dares not anger or offend her. When the men return, they see Rima and realize that she knows what they have done. Insulted by her attitude, Abel leaves for the natives' village. Soon, however, Abel realizes that he cannot stay away from Rima long. He returns to the jungle, finds Rima, and embraces her. Rima tells Nuflo that she wants to go beyond the forest, to the place her mother came from.

Issue #3: Rima leads Abel and Nuflo back to civilization, to the foot hills of Riolama, where Rima was born. Abel learns that Rima's name was taken from that place. Nearly 17 years earlier, Nuflo had joined a band of men who hated the government. At first, they fought for justice, but that soon changed. They became even more cruel than those they opposed. They began to loot and burn villages, imprisoning the women. Their acts became so evil, that Nuflo could abide them no longer. He withdrew from them, but did not run, for he feared their violent anger.

One morning, they scouted a small village from high atop the Riolama mountains. As night descended, they sought refuge in a nearby cave. They unpacked and prepared to rest. At midnight, standing at the cave entrance, was the most beautiful woman Nuflo had ever seen. She saw the men and fled. All but Nuflo followed. After some time, he exited the cave. All the men were dead, their necks broken, and the girl was gone. As he prepared to leave, Nuflo heard a strange sound. He followed it and found the woman, her leg wedged between sharp river rocks, where she had fallen trying to cross the slippery path. Nuflo freed her, and she promptly fainted. He carried her into the cave, where he tended to her. Nuflo watched over her for weeks. She never spoke, but the sadness never left her sweet face.

In time, Nuflo realized that the woman was going to have a child. One night, amidst howling wind and streaming rain, Rima was born. When a hungry mountain lion entered the cave, the shy, timid woman suddenly turned on the beast. She uttered a sharp command in a language Nuflo did not understand, and the lion turned and left. As the child grew, her mother became weaker. When Rima was 4 or 5 years old, her mother died. They buried her on a crest overlooking the valley, high on Riolama.

Nuflo and Rima wandered until they came across the forest. Rima chose it as their home. Over time, the natives of the region called her Daughter of the Didi (Evil One). Rima detested them because they hunted and killed wild animals. One day, they made the mistake of pursuing her through the forest. She fought back, killing some of the men. The natives fled in fear, never to enter the forest again.

Rima, Abel, and Nuflo arrive at Riolama, Rima's birthplace. Rima states that Riolama was not her mother's home, and that she must go on alone the rest of the way.

Issue #4: Abel stands at the edge of the remote Venezuelan jungle, thinking about Rima. He is attacked and captured by the Malagar tribe, blood enemies of the natives with whom he had lived. The Malagar plan to behead Abel but, before he dies, they want to show him that Rima is gone for good. At dawn, they head for Rima's jungle home. Deep in the forest, they are attacked by crocodiles. Abel escapes and runs to Nuflo's hut, but once there he finds that the old man is dead, murdered by the Malagar. He returns to the old tree, only to find it charred by fire. He has a horrible vision in which the Malagar attack Rima, burning her alive alongside the tree.

Believing Rima is dead, the distraught Abel finds his native friends, and warns them of the Malagar. The natives attack and vanquish their enemies. After Abel buries Nuflo, he walks into the forest thinking of his lost love. Rima miraculously appears, saying she could not leave the forest, for Riolama is too far from all she loves. Abel cannot believe his eyes, but Rima explains that while the flames scorched her arms and legs, she escaped the terrible fire. Hand in hand, the lovers return to their jungle paradise.


Rima (the cartoon) :

THE ALL-NEW SUPERFRIENDS HOUR (Hanna-Barbera, 1977)
Episode 4/4 "Fire!" (first aired: October 1st, 1977)
Batman, Robin, and Rima the Jungle Girl contend with a spreading forest fire, and have to search for a pair of escaped prisoners who have stolen a forestry truck filled with dynamite.

THE ALL-NEW SUPERFRIENDS HOUR (Hanna-Barbera, 1977)
Episode 7/4 "River of Doom" (first aired: October 22nd, 1977)
Wonder Woman and Rima search for archaeologists who have accidentally stumbled upon an ancient burial ground. The archaeologists have been captured by the angry natives and sentenced to death on the River of Doom.

SUPER FRIENDS (Hanna-Barbera, 1980)
Episode 7/3?? "Return of Atlantis" (first aired: December 13th?? 1980)
When the lost city of Atlantis rises, Aquaman is captured by Ocina and her warriors. They plan to conquer the surface world, but they must first battle another female army consisting of Rima, Wonder Woman, and the Amazons of Paradise Island.



the4thpip
Member
posted December 24, 2001 08:43 AM

Was that quintet of Gods ever covered that the JLA fought just before Ray Palmer's and Jean Loring's wedding?



The Vigilante
Member
posted December 24, 2001 09:39 AM

Slam Bradley ( direct from my webpage http://members.tripod.com/originalviglante.slambradley.htm )

Slam Bradley was one of the many comic book creations of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, the men responsible for Superman. Superman had already been designed at the time they created Slam, but they were holding out to sell the character to a newspaper syndicate.

Slam debuted in the first issue of DETECTIVE COMICS, back in 1937. His first adventure introduced him, his partner, Shorty Morgan, and the general lean of his adventures: Fights, fights and more fights. Slam was a man of action...the splash page of his first adventure describes him as an "ace freelance sleuth, fighter and adventurer", and had him using a man as a club to hit another man! That first story had him fighting an "inscrutable Oriental" menace, obviously much influenced by the works of Sax Rohmer (in fact, a few years later DC Comics would serialize a Fu Manchu novel in the pages of Detective Comics). The "Oriental" villain was apparently very popular back in the late thirties, since two different stories in that pivotal first issue featured a Chinese mastermind as the bad guy. I'm sure they were all good fun back then, but the stories tend to have a racially offensive appearance nowadays, with many depictions being barely recognizable as human.

Times change and one must look at such things in terms of the era they were created in. Slam Bradley himself became much more of a dilettante in later issues, though he did still love a good brawl and had a hair-trigger temper. Slam and Shorty worked with the police, Federal investigators, fire departments and many other law enforcement officials and agencies. The pair had all sorts of adventures, from their initial foray into Chinatown, to tracking down a condemned murderer in Switzerland, to saving a small crippled boy from a building on fire from arson. Slam Bradley lasted in DETECTIVE COMICS until issue #152, giving him a rather respectable run for a non-costumed hero, even in the Golden Age.

Slam Bradley seemed destined for creative oblivion until 1981, when he was brought back into DETECTIVE COMICS for the anniversary 500th issue. His story in this issue, "The Too Many Cooks Caper" was a great homage to the many features and the hundreds of mystery stories that had appeared in the legendary title since 1937. Slam joined such deductive luminaries as Roy Raymond, TV Detective, Jason Bard, Christopher Chance (The Human Target), Pow-Wow Smith, Captain Mark Compass, and Mysto, Magician-Detective to solve the mystery of the apparent murder of their fellow detective Archie Evergreen. Slam was much more of a typical hard-boiled, Sam Spade-like detective in this issue, with a lot of native intelligence and his yen for violence (subdued though that may be because of his age).

The Slam Bradley feature in that special issue apparently got enough accolades so that the writers remembered him, and got Slam a major part in the next anniversary issue of DETECTIVE COMICS #572, which commemorated the comic's fifty year existence. This time, Slam joined forces with four of the DC Universe's greatest detectives: The Batman, Robin, The Elongated Man and Sherlock Holmes, to solve a mystery and a murder plot that spanned a century. Slam has to attempt to solve the murder of his partner Shorty at the same time. This has to be one of the best and most fun stories to have ever appeared in Detective Comics featuring a multitude of talented artists (including Alan Davis, Carmine Infantino and Nestor Redondo). Slam's characterization as a gumshoe was of a man being much more thoughtful, but still never swaying when the need to take action presented itself. "Mellower" is the term I can best use to describe Slam, and the young Robin (the late Jason Todd, Batman's second partner) was quite taken with Slam's style. Slam even stood down the Batman...a feat that few men would probably have the nerve to even try.



outpost2
Member
posted December 26, 2001 12:50 AM

Originally posted by the4thpip:


Was that quintet of Gods ever covered that the JLA fought just before Ray Palmer's and Jean Loring's wedding?

The only characters I can think of off hand that might fit your description are the heroes of the Microcosmos, who appeared in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #213 (Apr 1983) - #215 (June 1983), but that's a few years after the Atom's wedding. They were Wanderer (Krystal Kaa), Twigg, Sister Light & Mother Moon of the Siren Sisterhood, and Mule. They have not yet been covered. Were these the ones you were thinking of?



the4thpip
Member
posted December 26, 2001 03:55 AM

Originally posted by outpost2:


The only characters I can think of off hand that might fit your description are the heroes of the Microcosmos, who appeared in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #213 (Apr 1983) - #215 (June 1983), but that's a few years after the Atom's wedding. They were Wanderer (Krystal Kaa), Twigg, Sister Light & Mother Moon of the Siren Sisterhood, and Mule. They have not yet been covered. Were these the ones you were thinking of?

No no no, that was much later, with art by Don Heck. I only have the issues I mean in a German collection, so I have no ideas about the actual names. Art was by Dick Dillin. The JLA and the Phantom Stranger battle a quintet of lost gods who had spent a few millenia as a 5-headed being when their continent had sunk into the sea Atlantis-style. 4 of them were rather evil: A god of plants, of war-god, a god of gambling and some kind of love-godess who could mentally control men. The fifth was a Zeus-like character whom the other ones imprisoned when they decided to take over the world. He was freed by Phantom Stranger, Red Tornado and Batman. The final chapter of the story has Supergirl freeing Superman from the love-godess' influence, Atom revealing his secret ID to Jean, and ends in the wedding.



outpost2
Member
posted December 27, 2001 11:22 PM

Well, I dusted off my box of JLA and found the issue you were talking about. The story is from JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #156 (July 1978), "The Fiend With Five Faces!".

The Justice Leaguers battle four gods, who are causing all kinds of havoc. Over the course of the story, the heroes learn that, many millennia ago, while humanity was still in it's primitive infancy, the last five living gods of Oceania thrived in peace on an isle of plenty. They were Tangora the Wise, Ku the War-God, Mauri the Love-Goddess, Tane the Nature-God, and Rongo the Jester. One day, 70,000 years ago, Tangora saw dark clouds swirling on the horizon. He warned the others of a coming disaster, but they only laughed. Then the disaster did come. Earthquakes, storms, floods, and other catastrophes struck all over the world. Tangora proclaimed that the Great Age was ending, that the time for gods was past. They would all die unless they joined together for common survival. The others dissented, but Tangora insisted there was no other way. The five gods of Oceania joined hands and merged into one, a single being with five faces. The isle was sinking, gales raged across the Earth, and glaciers began their long march south to begin the last ice age. The merged gods sought high ground, but there was no escape. Before the waters closed in, Tangora spoke of a day when the seas would recede, freeing them from their imprisonment. When that time came, he said, they would need restraint, lest they overpower the new race with their magnificence. The other gods pretended to heed him, but they had other plans. They passed into a dreaming death, as the rising waters claimed their island. Recently, Oceania surfaced and the gods were freed.

One group of Justice Leaguers locate the imprisoned Tangora, who was betrayed and bound by the others when the island surfaced and the quintet separated. Once freed, the leader of the gods summons the other four against their wills back to their island home. Tangora explains to the heroes that this happens every time they return to the surface world. They arise periodically to recover their lost strength and to regain, for a time, their much-needed individuality. Each time they rise, the other four believe it is their first time. They can only remain on the surface for one lunar interval, then they must merge once again and return to their watery grave. The memory is so painful that only Tangora can retain it. The others forget the wars, the disasters, and the tragedies they cause. The five gods then merge back into the "fiend with five faces", and the island sinks beneath the waves, as it has countless times before.



outpost2
Member
posted January 03, 2002 10:27 PM

YANGO THE SUPER-APE
Superboy [first series] #172 (March 1971)

Noted Kryptonian anthropologist, Professor An-Kal, aware of Krypton's pending destruction, places his young experimental ape, Yango, into an escape rocket. After years of intense conditional-cybernetic brain-programming, time that he had devoted to Yango since birth, An-Kal was not about to let Yango perish. The Science Council of Krypton would not accept An-Kal's revolutionary "genetic alterance" theory. The bitter scientist has decided to send his small friend to the jungles of Earth, to carry on his work. Of course, elsewhere on Krypton, the scientist Jor-El and his wife Lara prepare to send their son, Kal-El, to Earth as well. As Krypton explodes, the two rockets, equipped with warp-engines, travel through space until they reach Earth. Whereas Jor-El has sent his son to the heartland of America, An-Kal has sent his small ape to the mountains of Kenya, "Gorilla Country", where he hopes Yango will be accepted and respected.

Fifteen years later, in Kenya, an ivory-poacher prepares to gather the elephant he has just killed. The poacher's bearers scream out "Yango! Yango!" as a large ape swoops down and carries both the poacher and the elephant off. Later, game-preserve officers have no luck interrogating the frightened natives, so they radio Superboy for help. At that moment, elsewhere in the jungle, two hunters who have been commissioned by a zoo to bring back some live gorillas, kill one in order to draw out the others. As they and their bearers set up nets, Yango swoops down and carries off the two hunters. Again the game-preserve officers are summoned but cannot get a clear picture from the natives as to what exactly has transpired. Believing that the gorillas will search out their lost brother, Superboy acquires a gorilla hide and poses as the fallen ape.

Soon, the other gorillas arrive and carry the disguised Superboy back to a camouflaged cave. Superboy cannot believe what he sees when he is carried inside ... a great arch, carved into the shape of a gorilla's head, wearing a crown containing a glowing red sun symbol. Superboy notes that the glowing orb reminds him of similar symbols from Krypton. Superboy is then carried through the arch into the inner cavern. There he sees an entire underground ape city! A giant statue of a garbed ape, again wearing a glowing red sun crown, stands over a large throne. Superboy suddenly hears gunfire. It is the three captured humans, who have gotten free and are trying to escape. Superboy then hears an unseen entity yelling words in his original Kryptonian tongue! As the men try to shoot their way out of the cave, Superboy tries to help, but he is exposed by the other apes as a human. The apes call for Yango, their protector. The large super-ape, Yango, flies in, ripping the gorilla disguise off of Superboy. Yango tells his brothers that he will deal with the human impostor. Yango and Superboy fight with one another, but they soon realize that they are both facing a stalemate. Superboy addresses Yango in Kryptonese, taunting him. The angry super-ape grabs Superboy and throws him through the cavern wall and into orbit.

Superboy, surmising that the super-ape is from Krypton, uses his ability to break the time-barrier to discover the secret of Yango's origins. Superboy then returns to the jungle, where he finds the three men being chased by a group of gorillas. The men are shocked when Superboy gathers them up and brings them back to the cave. In Kryptonese, Superboy explains to Yango that he has learned of the ape’s past. He trusts that Yango will not kill the poachers because he has chosen to protect the animal world, instead of using his mighty powers to conquer the planet. Superboy allows Yango to teach the men a lesson by leaving them imprisoned in the cave for a short while. Superboy flies off, bidding his new ally farewell.



outpost2
Member
posted January 05, 2002 01:21 AM

TIGER-MAN

Real Name: Desmond Farr
Height: (as Farr) 6 ft. 4 in.
Weight: (as Farr) 230 lbs.
Height: (as Tiger-Man) 6 ft. 10 in.
Weight: (as Tiger-Man) 600 lbs.

Dean and Desmond Farr come from very old money. Their family had built a fortune in real estate and stocks. The brothers are twins, with a rather bizarre relationship. Since either of them could remember, whenever Dean felt pain, Desmond would also. Doctors were at a loss to explain the phenomenon. The brothers grow to adulthood, with Desmond always feeling a little nervous about the effects their strange bond have upon him. Desmond becomes quite shaken when he discovers that his brother is planning a trip to India, to investigate the Valley of Tiger-Men. Desmond fears that if something should happen to Dean, he would suffer too. Dean suggests that the separation might do them both some good, and leaves promising to be extremely careful.

It isn’t long afterward that Desmond begins to feel an indescribable haziness clouding his mind. He concludes that his brother is in trouble and that he must help him before it’s too late. Three days later, Desmond arrives in the wilds of Bombay. He speaks to the local chief, the man who had related the tribal legend of the tiger-men to Dean. The legend states that, when man first lived on Earth, the tribe that settled in this region was threatened by great, hostile beasts. Something had to be done to make the village safe, so the people of the tribe set to work with strange herbs, until they finally discovered a mystic potion which could transform a man into a tiger-man. After the tiger-men chased the beasts back into the valley with the other creatures, they were given an antidote to return them to normal. The chief had told Dean that the great cavern where the potion was made still exists in the area they call “the Valley of the Tiger-Men”. That was many days ago, and since that time no one has set eyes on him.

As Desmond asks the tribal chief for a guide to the valley, a tiger-man attacks the village. The tiger-man turns and threatens the chief. When one of the natives shoots the creature, Desmond feels the impact of the bullet too. He realizes that the tiger-man must Dean, and stops the shooter as his brother flees. Desmond explains all about their special bond, and convinces the chief to lead him to the cave so they can capture his brother. They eventually locate the large cavern, finding the mystic tiger potions and antidote on the ground. Desmond asks why his brother lost his human intelligence, when the chief’s ancestors didn’t. The chief reads the ancient scrolls and concludes that Dean misinterpreted the primitive instructions. The potion must be taken slowly, over a period of ten minutes, or the mind will not retain human thought. Desmond realizes that there is no chance of them convincing his mindless brother to take the antidote, so he comes up with the idea of becoming a tiger-man himself so he can track down his twin.

The tribal chief administers the potion slowly to Desmond, who successfully transforms into another tiger-man. Desmond picks up the scent of his brother and follows him into mountain country, where he spots Dean being battered by a rogue elephant. Feeling the pain himself, Desmond leaps onto the elephant’s back, freeing his twin. As Desmond steers the beast into a mud bog, Dean takes off for the village. Fearing that the natives will shoot his brother, Desmond races after him. He finds Dean battering down an animal pen, and confronts him. When Desmond punches Dean in the stomach, he too feels the pain. He realizes that the only thing to do is to go for a knockout. With one mighty blow, both brothers are knocked unconscious. The chief takes that opportunity to administer the antidote to the twins. After they both awaken, Dean complains of a splitting headache. Desmond is elated, for he feels no pain. Their strange bond has been broken by this experience. Desmond is finally free to lead a normal life.

A few years later, Dean and Desmond go off on an adventure together. When Dean is killed in an accident, a transformation occurs that transfers Dean’s tiger-self over to Desmond. Desmond’s powers are increased two-fold. As Tiger-Man, Desmond is incredibly strong, quick, and agile. His five senses are quite remarkable. He soon learns that he carries a portion of his brother’s essence with him in the form of an extra sense around danger. Tiger-Man’s claws can cut through steel. His fur adapts to the surrounding climate. In very cold weather, his fur turns white, while his stripes remain black. Desmond comes to realize that it is risky for him to remain in his tiger-man form for long periods. He later joins up with his old friend and fellow adventurer, Buck Wargo, who heads a group of Monster Hunters.

One day, a powerless Guy Gardner reads a newspaper describing the latest plans of Buck Wargo and his crew. They are off to Nabba Jungle in search of the fabled Waters of the Warriors. The Waters are rumored to bestow great power upon the worthy. Guy, longing to regain his position as a hero, tracks down the adventurers and convinces Buck to allow him to join them on their quest. When they finally reach their goal, Guy learns that the prophecies of the Warrior Women of Nabba have foretold his coming. He drinks the magic potion, gaining amazing new powers. Later, Buck Wargo, Desmond Farr, and the rest of the Monster Hunters surprise Guy with a generous gift... his very own bar, called “Warriors”. The bar is intended for meta-humans, and the Monster Hunters plan on spending a great deal of their free time relaxing with their new friend.

Tiger-Man appearances:
Tales Of The Unexpected #90 (Aug-Sep 1965)
Guy Gardner: Warrior #22 (July 1994), 23 (Aug 1994), 25 (Nov 1994), 26 (Dec 1994), 29 (March 1995), 31 (June 1995), 32 (July 1995), 36? (Nov 1995), 38 (Jan 1996), 39? (Feb 1996), 40 (March 1996), 41 (Apr 1996), 44 (July 1996)
Guy Gardner: Warrior Annual #1 (1995)
Guy Gardner Annual #2 (1996)



outpost2
Member
posted January 05, 2002 06:22 PM

THE OUTSIDERS
by Joe Simon, Jerry Grandenetti, and Crieg Flessel
First and only appearance: 1st Issue Special #10 (Jan 1976)

The year is 1970. The world press reports that an unmanned U.S. space probe has been sent to the planet Venus. There is something more remarkable about the rocket Alpha Zero however. It actually contains a crew of two: Colonel Markie, a military man, and Doctor Goodie, a renowned surgeon. Their long journey to Venus is nearly over. Doctor Goodie questions the need for the secrecy of the mission. He doesn't understand why they are going to such lengths to investigate mysterious laser signals coming from the planet. Markie explains that the laser beams could mean the end to cancer and all mankind's ills. That's the reason the military asked Doctor Goodie to come along. As they approach orbit, a sudden turbulence pulls them into a spin. They are caught in a strange magnetic force, which pulls them crashing into the planet's surface. Mysterious aliens pull Goodie's broken body from the wreckage and begin tending to his injuries.

Two years later, the military receive reports of an unidentified spacecraft, which has put down in the desert near their proving grounds. One General (Stagg?) recognizes the craft as their lost Venus probe, Alpha Zero. There is no sign of life, so they open the hatch and enter the craft. The General recoils in horror. He can't be sure, but he believes the misshapen creature lying unconscious before them is what remains of Doctor Goodie. Later, in a military hospital, Goodie is finally revived after receiving a dose of phenolbarbotus. The General explains to Goodie that he arrived in a state of suspended animation. Goodie feels strange, but strong, and is anxious to get out of the hospital. The General tells him he can't leave just yet, that something has happened to him. The General hands Goodie a mirror. The once handsome Doctor Goodie screams as he views his new, hideous features. The General explains that the military had undertaken a thorough examination of Goodie while he was unconscious, and they have concluded that some advanced medical team has put him together in a miraculous operation. His limbs are functioning through a system of involved computers. He is plasticized and mechanized... a cybernetic! Goodie doesn't understand why they left him with such an ugly face. The General surmises that they didn't feel that appearance was very important. Doctor Goodie has another theory. He suspects that the beings that operated on him didn't know what an Earthling looked like, so they made him over in their image!

A few months later, Doctor Goodie has since returned to his job as a surgeon at the Ronkite Medical Complex, the world's newest and most modern hospital. Goodie has created a convincing mask of his former face, one so realistic that it fools all of his coworkers. Both the female patients and nurses swoon over the handsome doctor, but he must remain distant lest they uncover his secret. Goodie uses his status as the world's most famous surgeon to establish private quarters twenty stories below the hospital. One nurse, Donna, who is particularly fond of him, comments that people are beginning to whisper that maybe he keeps a beautiful woman down there. Goodie retires to his luxurious suite, but it is not a beautiful woman that awaits him, but rather a small group of freaks. Among his grotesque friends, he prefers to be called Doctor Scary. The group, the Outsiders, work out of Goodie's lair in secret, monitoring the television for word of other outcasts like themselves.

The very first freak that Doctor Goodie had saved was Johnny. A man named Ahab Smith was out fishing in his boat. Although he hadn't had much luck all day, he felt a nibble as he reeled in his line for the last time. Smith gasped when he heaved his catch into the boat. It was a part lizard, part human creature. Smith rushed it to the Ronkite Medical Complex, where one of the doctors began examining it. Two days later, the doctor called in Doctor Goodie to show him what he had acquired. Goodie was shocked at what he saw. The doctor told him that the small creature had grown six inches in just the last two days. He grabbed a knife, and exclaimed that the merciful thing to do would be to kill it. Doctor Goodie tried to stop him, but the doctor pushed Goodie to the floor and raised the knife. The creature stung the doctor with his poison tongue, apparently killing him. Doctor Goodie gently picked up the frightened creature in a blanket and carried him to safety.

Goodie realized he could do a lot of good for people like Johnny. He created his Doctor Scary identity, and developed the concept of the Outsiders. Over the next few weeks, Lizard Johnny was soon joined by others, as Doc Scary rescued other freaks. The Amazing Ronnie, a one-eyed, four-armed, green-skinned beast. Hairy Larry, a troll-like man who was grafted to his motorized vehicle. And Mighty Mary, a woman with a beautiful face, cursed with a hulking body covered in orange scales and possessing flippers for hands.

The last freak that Goodie had saved was Billy. Old man Lundy lived and worked alone in his little tailor shop on Main Street. Or so everyone in town thought. It was rumored that Lundy kept his life savings hidden somewhere in his house. One night, two men entered the shop and pulled a gun on the old man, demanding his buried loot. He insisted that he was nothing but a poor working man. When the thugs spotted a trap door, the old man panicked and frantically tried to stop them. One of the men shot Lundy dead, then threw the gun out of the window. The two men descended into the secret basement. The thieves were frozen in terror as they were confronted by a boy with an enormous head. One of the men grabbed a piece of timber and repeatedly bashed the bizarre boy on the skull, with no effect. The men climbed out of the basement, and Billy followed. The boy saw his father lying dead on the floor, and headed towards the two men. They grabbed a kerosene lamp and threw it, setting the shop on fire. When Billy ran out of the burning building, the gathering crowd believed he was a monster and attacked him. News of the disturbance reached the Outsiders, and they rushed to Billy's aid. Billy was rescued and joined the Outsiders as it's newest member.



outpost2
Member
posted January 05, 2002 06:24 PM

Here's an update of the overall obscure characters list...

Completed this round (37 entries):

A7. Apache Chief
A20. Astralad
A22. Atlas II
A23. Atlas III
A25. Automan
A31. the Beefeater I & II
A36. Black Vulcan
A49. Captain Thunder
A68. the Cyclone Kids
A68+. Cyclotron II
A75. El Dorado
A81. Element Girl
A87+. the Fiend with Five Faces/ the gods of Oceania
A92. Flashback / Deja Vu
A103+. Golden Pharaoh
A113. Hercules I
A114. Hercules II
A122. Ibis the Invincible
A131+++. Janus, Son of Jupiter
A175. Mister E
A187. the Odd Man
A191+. the original Outsiders
A211. the Queen Bee (Marcia Monroe)
A214. the original Red Tornado
A215. Rima the Jungle Girl
A220. Samson
A222. Samurai
A226. Sgt. Gorilla
A237. Slam Bradley
A241+. Space Marshal
A243. Space Voyagers
A251. the Starman of 1957
A265. Tailgunner Jo
A276. Tiger-Man (Desmond Farr)
A281. the Tornado Twins
A295. Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog
A304. Yango the Super-Ape

Remaining (76 entries):

A1. Adam Strange II [Mystery In Space #94, #98; Hourman #11]
A8. Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel) [Adventure Comics #266]
A9. Aquagirl II (Selena) [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #133]
A10. Aquagirl III (Tula) [Aquaman [1st series] #33]
A16. the Arrows of Alaska [Adventure Comics #260]
A18+. the Assemblers and the Justifiers [Justice League Of America #87, Justice League Europe #19, Justice League Quarterly #3]
A19. Astra, Girl of the Future [Sensation Comics #99]
A26. Azrael I [Tales Of The Teen Titans #52]
A30. the Bat Squad [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #92]
A35. Blackrock I - IV [Action Comics #458-#459; Superman [1st series] #315, #325-#326; Superman Family#212-#213]
A38. BlueJay [Justice League Of America #87]
A43. Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun [Police Comics #2 by Quality Comics]
A45. Captain Incredible [Action Comics #354]
A53. the Chain Gang War [Chain Gang War #1]
A61. Colonel Future [Superman [1st series] #378]
A66. Crusader [Aquaman [1st series] #56]
A72. El Diablo (western hero) [All-Star Western [2nd series] #2]
A73+. Doctor Mist [Wisdom's Daughter, a novel by H. Rider Haggard; Super Friends #12; DC Comics Presents #46; Secret Origins [2nd ongoing series] #27]
A79. Dyno-Man of Sorrta [Superman [1st series] #206]
A82. the Eliminator [Action Comics #379]
A84. the Endless One [Justice League Of America #??]
A91. Firestar [ ?? ]
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time [Firestorm The Nuclear Man #70-71]
A97+. the Freedom Brigade (coming soon)
A101. Godiva [Super Friends #7]
A103. Golden Gladiator [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #1]
A110. the Hacker Files [The Hacker Files #1]
A114+. the heroes of the Microcosmos [Justice League Of America #213-#215]
A115. the Homeless Avenger [Vigilante #48]
A118. the Human Hurricane (Mitch Anderson) (coming soon)
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania [Action Comics #265]
A121. Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus [Superboy [1st series] #144]
A129. the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron [Adventure Comics #237]
A131. Isis [The Shazam!/Isis Hour 1976 live-action show; Shazam! #25]
A131+. Jack B. Quick / Johnny Quick II / Captain Speed [Justice League Of America #87, Justice League Europe #16, Justice League #2]
A131++. Jack O'Lantern I - III [Super Friends #8; Justice League Europe Annual #1; Justice League International Quarterly #14]
A135. Jemm, Son of Saturn [Jemm, Son Of Saturn #1]
A141+. the Justice Experience [Chase #6; Martian Manhunter [2nd series] #17,20,22,36]
A144. the Knights of the Galaxy [Mystery In Space #1]
A145. Kolossal Kate [Flash [1st series] #211]
A149. Lando, Man of Magic [World's Best Comics #1]
A152. the Liquidator [Aquaman [1st series] #38]
A153. Little Miss Redhead [Sensation Comics #72]
A156. Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching [Wonder Woman [1st series] #179]
A162. Marsboy [Superboy [1st series] #14, #16; Adventure Comics #195]
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra [Action Comics #272-#273]
A169. Mighty Man [ ?? ]
A171. Minstrel Maverick [All-American Western #103]
A178. Mystek [Ray [2nd series] #12?-#13?; Justice League Task Force #30-#32]
A179. Nadir, Master of Magic [New Adventure Comics #17]
A180. Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia [Action Comics #354]
A183. Nightwolf [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #323]
A185. Nubia [Wonder Woman [1st series] #204]
A193. Owlwoman [Super Friends #7]
A196. Petronius [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #3]
A197. the Planeteers [Real Fact Comics #16 ?]
A199. Power Lad [Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #45]
A201. Power-Man, King of Outer-Space [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #??]
A209. Pulsar [New Adventures of Superboy #31]
A225. Seraph [Super Friends #7]
A232. Silver Sorceress [Justice League Of America #87]
A233. the Sino-Supermen [Batman Family #19; Detective Comics #481-#482]
A241. Sonik [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #310]
A247. Stanley and his Monster [Fox And The Crow #95 ?]
A260. Superwoman (Kristen Wells) [DC Comics Presents Annual #2]
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #304-#307]
A270. the Terrific Whatzit (McSnurtle the Turtle) [Funny Stuff #1]
A272. the Third Archer (Andre Reynard) [Adventure Comics #162]
A275. Thunderlord [Super Friends #8]
A288. Ultraa (post-Crisis) [Justice League International [Quarterly] #13]
A293. the Viking Commando [All Out War #1]
A293+. Wandjina [Justice League Of America #87]
A297. Wild Dog [Wild Dog #1]
A300. the Wonder Twins (pre-Crisis) and Gleek [The All-New Super Friends Hour 1977 cartoon; Super Friends #7]
A301. the Wonder Twins (post-Crisis) [Extreme Justice #9]
A302. the Wyoming Kid [Western Comics #1]

That’s nearly one-third of the Round IV list completed, including later additions! Slow and steady, folks. Slow and steady. We’ll beat this beast yet!



Hellstone
Member
posted January 09, 2002 02:09 PM

This is soooo great! I'm having the time of my life in these threads. Almost better than sex.

- - -

Hellstone Productions, Inc. has been a bit lazy lately. But I still have a "Stanley and his Monster" piece on its way. And I'm willing to handle The Terrific Whatzit and Blue Jay/Silver Sorceress/Wandjina/Assemblers/Justifyers as well (if Outpost doesn't want to do that himself).

- - -

A few short comments:


Rich/The Vigilante - Is there any chance that you (or anyone else for that matter) can cover the modern appearances (post-DETECTIVE #527) appearances of Slam Bradley as well? Like his recent back-up in DETECTIVE COMICS, and, above all, his ACTION COMICS and SUPERMAN appearances in the 90s? (I still haven't figured out whether the current Slam Bradley is identical with the original, or a descendant.) And if someone could tell us something about Slam's older relative, Biff Bradley from GUNS OF THE DRAGON, I'd be happy too. And finally: Who actually killed Slam's partner, "Shorty" Morgan?


Outpost2 - These latest pieces of yours are great. Nothing like the good ol´ nostalgic feeling of yesteryear.

Yango the Super-Ape? Heh. I remember him from a Swedish edition of Superboy, and for years, I confused him with Beppo the Super-Monkey. So Yango was never referred to again, I take it?

Tiger-Man: I had no idea that he had appeared prior to his appearances in GUY GARDNER: WARRIOR. But this fact suddenly made the character more interesting in my eyes.

The Grandenetti Outsiders - Heheheheh!!! I can't believe that I didn't write this one. These are probably my favorites of the 1ST ISSUE SPECIAL series, campy and ridiculous as they are. Would love to see them return some day. Like in DOOM PATROL, or POWER COMPANY.


IceHotel - I'm sure someone like Outpost or Mikishawm can cover Blackbriar Thorn much better than I - but here is what I can tell from memory:

Blackbriar Thorn first appeared in DC COMICS PRESENTS #66 (Feb 94). An ancient druid who has survived for centuries in the form of a wood creature, the Blackbriar Thorn is awakened in modern times by the father of Lana Lang (who was an archeologist pre-Crisis) and wreaks havoc in Gotham City before being defeated by Superman and the Demon Etrigan.

Although he never had any subsequent appearances before the Crisis, this adventure was apparently enough for him to get his fact page in WHO'S WHO #1 (Apr 85), possibly because Len Wein, the creator of the character, was also WHO'S WHO editor at the time.

Next, we see Blackbriar Thorn in a couple of cameos. He is part of the Spectre's gathering of magicians who help save the Earth from the Anti-Monitor, in CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS #12. Then he has a run-in with John Constantine in an issue of SWAMP THING (Rick Veitch era, I believe). Maybe he was in HISTORY IN THE DC UNIVERSE #1, too - I've forgotten.

BB is also largely forgotten until he is revived during the Underworld Unleashed crossover in 1995. In the ABYSS: HELLS SENTINEL one-shot, he is part of Blaze's (and therefore, Neron's) minions. He battles Sentinel Alan Scott with his wooden body, only to discover that Alan is no longer vulnerable to wood.

So, in JSA #9-10, (Apr-May 2000), Thorn's enemyship with Alan is revisited, as he returns as a member of Johnny Sorrow's new Injustice Society. It doesn't go to well as Wildcat splinters BB's body and uses his remains as toothpicks. Nevertheless, the Tigress is able to re-animate Thorn's body with a new look (and, surprisingly enough, a more modern speech pattern) in JSA #16-18 (Nov 2000-Jan 2001). The villain almost succeeds in killing Alan Scott (who had regained his weakness against wooden materials), penetrating his chest with his body. At the end of the struggle, Thorn is defeated by the Star-Spangled Kid and her shooting stars.

The Blackbriar Thorn has not been seen since.


See ya soon.

/ola



Hellstone
Member
posted January 09, 2002 02:51 PM

Bonus feature: An old text that has already been seen on Kim Jensen's Definitive DC Guide. I thought of it after seeing the piece on the original Outsiders (since this character also originated in 1ST ISSUE SPECIAL) and thought you might be interested.

From me to you - the unofficial CODENAME: ASSASSIN biography:


CODENAME: ASSASSIN
Created by Gerry Conway, Steven Skeates, Carmine Infantino, and the Redondo Studios

Profile written by Ola Hellsten

PERSONAL DATA:
Alter Ego: Jonathan Drew
Occupation: Vigilante, Assassin
Marital Status: Unknown
Known Relatives: Unnamed parents (deceased),
Marie (sister, deceased)
Group Affiliations: None
Base of Operations: New York City, NY
Height: N/A
Weight: N/A
Hair: Blond
Eyes: Blue
Skin: Caucasian white
First Appearance: 1st Issue Special #11 (February 1976)

HISTORY:
When Jonathan Drew was ten years old, his parents died under as yet unrevealed circumstances. Standing by their gravestone, his older sister Marie said to him, "now that mom and dad are gone, I'll take care of you, and you'll take care of me." She promised never to leave him and that he didn't have to be afraid. He believed her.

Eleven years later, in 1976, Jonathan found himself completing his first year of Graduate School at Antioke University. After flunking his psychiatry course, he agreed to participate in an E.S.P. research experiment designed by a Doctor Andrew Stone. By doing that, he would pass his exam.

But something in the experiment went horribly wrong. While Jonathan was still attached to Stone's "E.S.P. machinery", Stone's colleague, Doctor Anderson, accidentally stumbled on a power cable, which resulted in the testing device blowing up, and a surge of power flowing through Jonathan Drew's body.

Waking up in a hospital, Jonathan was thirsty and was going to ask for a glass of water. However, the water came to him before nobody had had the chance of giving it to him. Watching the decanter floating in the air, Jonthan let out a scream of shock as he realized that he had gained telekinetic powers.

More shocks were on their way. Leaving the hospital, Marie started telling Jonathan a secret she had kept for years, but before she had even finished the first sentence, she was gunned down by machine-gun fire from a passing car. In shock and rage, Jonathan insinctively let out a burst of his new-found power, crushing the car with it.

He later found out that Marie had been working for a crimeboss named Victor Grummun, only to earn money so that Jonathan could go to college. For some reason, she became a security risk, and was killed. After learning this, Jonathan went underground for some time, training and developing his powers for the task that had to be done. When he appeared again, it was as the costumed vigilante with the codename: Assassin.

Going after Grummun's employees Rossi, Morganthau, and Carmody, killing some and delivering others to the authorities, the Assassin made a name of himself, angering Victor Grummun himself. Grummun vowed to kill the Assassin before the Assassin would kill him.

The Assassin evidently had some associates since establashing himself. He has mentioned a man named Ben who possibly was another casualty in the war against crime. While the district attorney Roberts and police commissioner Runyon seemed to be thankful for the Assassin's contribution to their daily work, Jonathan's own friend Doctor Stone considered him a very ill man.

Judging from their comments, it also seems that the Assassin's real identity was public knowledge, at least among the authorities.

When last seen, the Assassin had just entered Grummun's yacht, and was engaged in a fight against two hired metahuman thugs called Snake and Powerhouse. It is not known how this conflict ended.

Further exploits of the Jonathan Drew are unrecorded, although Ted Knight, the original Starman, has stated that he encountered the Assassin in Opal City in the late 1970s, and that his career was very brief.

Obsessed and uncompromising, the Assassin would seemingly do whatever it takes to put Grummun and his likes to justice. The swift ending of his vigilante careermay imply that he succeeded...or that he failed.

POWERS AND ABILITIES:
The Assassin had a variety of mental powers. His telepathic abilities allowed him to read the thought of other humans, as well as noticing their presence before seeing or hearing them come. His telekinetics allowed him to move objects at least as heavy as himself, and to walk in the air. Occasionally, he could also emit devastating blasts of mental energy, enough to blow up a car, or to burn out a man's psyche. However, this ability seemed exclusively restricted to acts of pure reflex. The Assassin's mental powers were not inexhaustible, and he had to let them re-load once in a while.

Apart from using his mental powers, the Assassin was also an excellent hand-to-hand combatant. He carried a gun with which he could shoot tranquilizer darts, and he sometimes used other equipment such as a pocket blowtorch, which he carried in his utility belt.

APPEARANCE LIST:
1ST ISSUE SPECIAL #11 (February, 1976)
STARMAN (2nd series) #76 (April 2001) (mentioned only)

"I've a feeling this is a fight we're all going to enjoy!" - The Assassin
Quote taken from 1st Issue Special #11 (February, 1976)


Will be back soon with more.

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 10, 2002 09:50 PM

Hellstone,

The more entries that you can handle the better, so the Assemblers/Justifers/etc. are all yours. Looking forward to Stanley and his Monster and The Terrific Whatzit too!

Always liked Yango. I probably wondered myself about Beppo when I was first exposed to him. Yes, this was his only appearance.

I didn't know about Tiger-Man's first appearance either. I think I spotted the reference in a text page in one of the GUY GARDNER ANNUALs. Searched for it for a few years. Finally found a "heavily read" copy.

I'd always thought a team up between the new and old versions of the Outsiders would have been a lot of fun. Given DC's stupid rule about not having two characters (or groups) with the same name, I guess I'm not surprised.

As for the future, I'll try tackling the following:

A1. Adam Strange II
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time
A97+. the Freedom Brigade
A118. the Human Hurricane
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda

To all,

FYI... I've cleaned up and archived this thread at www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/msgboards .

Also, Hellstone mentions in his post the nostalgic feeling he gets from this thread. That got me wondering how many people here are old-timers, and how many are newbies. I'd like to suggest that, every time this thread needs a "bump", someone different post a little something about themselves. I'll start...

Outpost2 (John C.)
New Jersey, USA
Started reading comics around 1971 or 1972 (has it been 30 years already!). Size of collection: 33,306 (give or take). Everything pre-1980 is low grade, but I honestly don't care. I'm just glad to have 'em at all! Philosophy: It's better to have 10 low grade comics to read than 1 high grade book that you're afraid to touch.



Ray Palmer
Member
posted January 11, 2002 08:07 AM

Originally posted by Hellstone:


IceHotel - I'm sure someone like Outpost or Mikishawm can cover Blackbriar Thorn much better than I - but here is what I can tell from memory:

Blackbriar Thorn first appeared in DC COMICS PRESENTS #66 (Feb 94). An ancient druid who has survived for centuries in the form of a wood creature, the Blackbriar Thorn is awakened in modern times by the father of Lana Lang (who was an archeologist pre-Crisis) and wreaks havoc in Gotham City before being defeated by Superman and the Demon Etrigan.


I don't have any facts, but wasn't Blackbriar Thorn a Golden Age villain? Maybe I got that impression from seeing him fight GL in Underworld and later in JSA, but I don't have the GA resources to check this out.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 11, 2002 08:16 AM

Originally posted by Ray Palmer:


I don't have any facts, but wasn't Blackbriar Thorn a Golden Age villain? Maybe I got that impression from seeing him fight GL in Underworld and later in JSA, but I don't have the GA resources to check this out.

Nope. Blackbriar Thorn is pure Bronze Age. Of that I'm certain.

By the way, the DCCP issue where Blackbriar Thorn first appeared, is also the first time Etrigan starts rhyming in every sentence. (Before that it had only been his transformation spells that rhymed.)

And with help of the poster called Alec Holland, I finally located Thorn's SWAMP THING appearance. It was in SWAMP THING (2nd series) #70, that John Constantine summoned Thorn's spirit.

/ola



datalore
Member
posted January 11, 2002 08:53 AM

Blackbriar Thorn was in SWAMP THING?

Likely true, but it doesn't ring a bell...


...and, though I don't come here enough...

I'm Dave, been into comics since the 1970s (first book, SHAZAM! #15 the "Big Red Cheese" vs. Mr. Mind and LEX LUTHOR!); and I think the fun of comics is reading them (and seeing how all this stuff relates...), and I've been overjoyed to see Kurt Busiek's POWER COMPANY (I mean, where else would we see Dr. Ovarni, Bad Samaritan or Nekron, the Lord of the Unliving lately????) I have a feeling we'll see characters listed above, or even MORE obscure folks, soon...



Hellstone
Member
posted January 11, 2002 11:05 AM

Datalore - couldn't agree more.

Since the wish list is so long anyway, how about if I add a few more?

Who wants to tell us the stories of

Glenn Merrit (From Beyond the Unknown #7-8)
The Human Cannonball (Superman Family #188)?
Ringmaster (Flash Vol.1 #261-264)?
The Waterfront Warrior (Huntress monthly)?
Watt the Question Man (All-Flash Comics)?

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 11, 2002 09:07 PM

I have FROM BEYOND THE UNKNOWN #7-8 somewhere, so I'll add Glenn Merrit to my "to do" list.

The Human Cannonball was already covered in a prior round, however I don't recall how detailed the entry was. I'll check it out.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 13, 2002 08:08 AM

Oh, was he? I guess I was the one who asked about him, so I should have remembered that...

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 15, 2002 10:34 PM

Recently completed:
A33+. Blackbriar Thorn
A60+. Codename: Assassin

Request for expanded entry:
A117. the Human Cannonball [Superman Family #188-#?]

Requests for new entries:
A72+. the Dingbats of Danger Street [1st Issue Special #6, Advs Of Superman #549]
A100+. Glenn Merrit [From Beyond The Unknown #7-#8]
A107+. the Green Team [1st Issue Special #2, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Advs Of Superman #549]
A215+. Ringmaster [Flash v1 #261-#264]
A251+. Starman (Mikaal Tomas) [1st Issue Special #12, Starman v2 series]
A293++. the Waterfront Warrior [Huntress v1 series]
A293+++. Watt the Question Man [All-Flash #?]



Hellstone
Member
posted January 16, 2002 05:57 AM

I hope you won't hate me now, but...three more requests:

Batman 2050 (HEX #11-12)
Bard the Rainmaker (a 1957 Jack Kirby creation using the Hammer of Thor - sounds familiar?) (TALES OF THE UNEXPECTED #?)
Luma Lunai, the first Superwoman (ACTION COMICS #289)

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 16, 2002 10:53 AM

Hellstone:

Good additions. However, one of them has already been addressed...

A261. Superwoman (Luma Lynai of Staryl)

We can add it back to the "to do" list for further elaboration, if you wish.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 16, 2002 11:42 AM

God, I'm getting senile here. And to think that I was the unofficial caretaker of the topic in those days.

But anyway - I'd like an expanded Luna Lymai bio if you know something more about her.

/ola



The Vigilante
Member
posted January 16, 2002 12:04 PM

Originally posted by Hellstone:


Rich/The Vigilante - Is there any chance that you (or anyone else for that matter) can cover the modern appearances (post-DETECTIVE #527) appearances of Slam Bradley as well? Like his recent back-up in DETECTIVE COMICS, and, above all, his ACTION COMICS and SUPERMAN appearances in the 90s? (I still haven't figured out whether the current Slam Bradley is identical with the original, or a descendant.) And if someone could tell us something about Slam's older relative, Biff Bradley from GUNS OF THE DRAGON, I'd be happy too.
And finally: Who actually killed Slam's partner, "Shorty" Morgan?


Well, heck. I guess this is what comes from not reading the Bat or Super books. I didn't even know he showed up anywhere recently. Anyone got some issue numbers?

As for who killed Shorty, I'll check that out and get back to you folks with the info in a little while.

Sheesh...just when you think you've finished a web page on the most obscure character, DC has to go and dredge him up again. Like I won't have enough work revising my Crimson Avenger page next month



outpost2
Member
posted January 17, 2002 09:57 PM

THE FREEDOM BRIGADE are best known as the parents of the incompetent Inferior Five. However, unlike their children, the Brigade were quite a formidable force against evil. Since only bits and pieces of information about the Freedom Brigade and it's members are available, I will attempt to create a post-Crisis view of their adventures from what is already known.

So exactly when and where were the Freedom Brigade active? Well, we know that when the Inferior Five first appeared, the Brigade had retired "nearly 20 years ago". Using the 12-year timeline from SECRET FILES & ORIGINS GUIDE TO THE DC UNIVERSE 2000, the Inferior Five would have appeared about "7 years ago", therefore the Freedom Brigade would have retired about "26 years ago", or around 1974. This would have made them contemporaries of the Justice Experience, a group retroactively introduced in CHASE #6. It is assumed that the Freedom Brigade was active primarily in the city of Megalopolis.

Here's a look at the membership roster...

1. The Patriot (Mr. Victor, first name unrevealed)

The Patriot comes from a family of heroes who, by the 1960's, had been fighting crime for 130 years. In fact, the Patriot is the son of Reed Victor, a.k.a. Yellowjacket who, with his partner Plato, had fought crime in the 1920's. When the Freedom Brigade retired, the Patriot married his teammate, Lady Liberty, and they gave birth to a son named Myron Victor, who later became Merryman, the bumbling leader of the Inferior Five.

2. Lady Liberty (Miss Berkeley, first name unrevealed, later Mrs. Victor)

Lady Liberty also comes from a long line of heroes. For instance, her ancestor, Sir Chauncey Berkeley, fought tyranny in late 18th century France as the hero called the Crimson Chrysanthemum. When the Freedom Brigade retired, Lady Liberty married her teammate, the Patriot, and soon gave birth to their son Myron.

3. Captain Swift (Mr. Cramer, first name unrevealed)

Not much is known about Captain Swift, except that he is the father of Herman Cramer, a.k.a. the Blimp. Captain Swift's costume is almost identical to that of the Barry Allen Flash, and would certainly need to be altered for the new DCU. One possible post-Crisis explanation for Swift's super-speed is that he is the son of a golden age speedster. Given what we know of Jay Garrick, it is not plausible for him to be Swift's father. It is possible however that Captain Swift is the illegitimate son of Quicksilver, a.k.a. Max Mercury, which would make the Blimp Max's grandson. Another possibility is that he is the illegitimate son of Johnny Quick. In this case, Captain Swift would be Jesse Quick's half-brother, while the Blimp would be Johnny Quick's grandson and Jesse Quick's nephew.

4. The Bowman (Mr. King, first name unrevealed)

Nothing at all is known about the archer called the Bowman, except that he is the father of William King a.k.a. White Feather. The Bowman's costume is almost identical to the original costume worn by Green Arrow, and would also need to be altered for the new DCU.

5. Princess Power (real name unrevealed, alias Ms. Tremor, later Mrs. Tremor-O'Day)

Not much was revealed about the pre-Crisis Princess Power, except than she was the mother of Dumb Bunny and wore a costume virtually identical to Wonder Woman's. However, a complete post-Crisis origin and a brand-new costume were supplied for her in the 1991 ANGEL AND THE APE mini-series. Princess Power, we learned, was from a lost subterranean Amazon tribe discovered by Prof. O'Day. After she retired, Princess Power married O'Day, her true love. He believed he could handle living with a woman with super-powers, but discovered that he couldn't and left her after their daughter, Athena Tremor, was born. Prof. O'Day supported his daughter, but needed a more normal relationship. He married another woman, but she died soon after giving birth to his second daughter, Angel O'Day. Princess Power returned and took the two of them in. The couple soon re-married. According to the "Angel And The Ape" mini-series, Princess Power is now deceased.

6. Mr. Might (Barb-Ell of the planet Neon, alias Mr. Brent, first name unrevealed)

When the Freedom Brigade retired, Mr. Might married his teammate, the Mermaid. The Mermaid soon gave birth to Leander Brent, later called Awkwardman. The pre-Crisis Mr. Might claimed that he was born Barb-Ell of the planet Neon, son of Dumb-Ell. After the citizens of Neon ignored his warnings of their planet's pending destruction, Dumb-Ell sent his son Barb-Ell in a rocket to Earth. Of course, Neon never exploded. Dumb-Ell, it turned out, was a complete crackpot! Because this origin is so similar to Superman's, the post-Crisis version might be retconned as follows: Mr. Might was always embarrassed about the fact that he was the product of a one-night stand. His mother wasn't even sure who his father was, but she assumed that he must have had meta-genes, which he passed on to his son. (His mother secretly feared that his father was the super-strong villain called Ubermensch, a member of Axis Amerika.) In his retirement, after Superman's Kryptonian origins had become public knowledge, Mr. Might invented the tall-tale about the planet Neon to cover his embarrassment over his true roots.

7. The Mermaid (first name and maiden name unrevealed, later Mrs. Brent)

Although nothing is really known about the Mermaid, it is clear she was intended to be of Atlantean origins. When the Freedom Brigade retired, the Mermaid married her teammate, Mr. Might. The Mermaid soon gave birth to their son, Leander Brent. Because of the similarities between her and Little Mermaid of the Global Guardians, we can postulate that perhaps, in the current DCU, the Mermaid is Little Mermaid's aunt, making Little Mermaid and Awkwardman cousins.

Finally, here's a list of the known enemies of the Freedom Brigade:

1. Dr. Evil. The Megalopolis police disbanded their mad scientist division after the Brigade ended his career.

2. The Masked Swastika. Enemy of the Patriot. Hitler's top agent. The Inferior Five would later unmask the Masked Swastika , revealing that he resembles none other than Napoleon Bonaparte.

3. Sparrow. Enemy of the Bowman.

4. The Speed Demon. Enemy of Captain Swift.

5. The Silver Sorceress. Enemy of Princess Power.

The Freedom Brigade first appeared in SHOWCASE #62 (May-June 1966). When last seen, in SHOWCASE #65 (Nov-Dec 1966), the retired heroes had become instructors at Dean Egghead's Academy for Super-Heroes.

Post Script: I wanted to create a picture of the Freedom Brigade to show just how similar their costumes were to those of the Justice Leaguers. I realized that one of the JUSTICE LEAGUE ARCHIVE covers would be perfect as a base for such a picture, so I started with that and began the painful process of bit manipulation. The result is far from perfect, but you'll get the idea. One interesting thing I learned, which actually caused me to do a significant amount of rework, was that the color schemes of the costumes were altered in the DC DIGEST reprint of the Inferior Five's origin. What you'll see is the true colors as shown in Showcase #62. The picture can be found at http://www.infiniteearths.org/dcu/whoswho/freedombrigade.jpg .



dnewton
Member
posted January 18, 2002 07:02 AM

I would like info on the following DC characters-
Black Thorn:
Hazard:
Overthrow:



The Vigilante
Member
posted January 18, 2002 08:41 AM

Update on Slam Bradley:

I read through DETECTIVE #572 again yesterday and Slam's partner Shorty Morgan was killed by drug pushers. It happened off-panel and was noted in a newspaper headline.



outpost2
Member
posted January 19, 2002 05:04 PM

Outpost2's to-do list (7 entries):

A1. Adam Strange II
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time
A100+. Glenn Merrit
A118. the Human Hurricane
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man of Zoron / Oceania
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man of Terra
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda

Hellstone's to-do list (7 entries):

A18+. the Assemblers and the Justifiers
A38. BlueJay
A131+. Jack B. Quick / Johnny Quick II / Captain Speed
A232. Silver Sorceress
A247. Stanley and his Monster
A270. the Terrific Whatzit
A293+. Wandjina

Looking for volunteers (74 entries):

A8. Aquagirl I (Lisa Morel) [Adventure Comics #266]
A9. Aquagirl II (Selena) [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #133]
A10. Aquagirl III (Tula) [Aquaman [1st series] #33]
A16. the Arrows of Alaska [Adventure Comics #260]
A19. Astra, Girl of the Future [Sensation Comics #99]
A26. Azrael I [Tales Of The Teen Titans #52]
A28+. Bard the Rainmaker [Tales Of The Unexpected #??]
A29+. Batman 2050 [Hex #11-12]
A30. the Bat Squad [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #92]
A35. Blackrock I - IV [Action Comics #458-#459; Superman [1st series] #315, #325-#326; Superman Family#212-#213]
A35+. Black Thorn [Vigilante #45]
A43. Burp the Twerp, the Super Son-Of-A-Gun [Police Comics #2 by Quality Comics]
A45. Captain Incredible [Action Comics #354]
A53. the Chain Gang War [Chain Gang War #1]
A61. Colonel Future [Superman [1st series] #378]
A66. Crusader [Aquaman [1st series] #56]
A72. El Diablo (western hero) [All-Star Western [2nd series] #2]
A72+. the Dingbats of Danger Street [1st Issue Special #6, Advs Of Superman #549]
A73+. Doctor Mist [Wisdom's Daughter, a novel by H. Rider Haggard; Super Friends #12; DC Comics Presents #46; Secret Origins [2nd ongoing series] #27]
A79. Dyno-Man of Sorrta [Superman [1st series] #206]
A82. the Eliminator [Action Comics #379]
A84. the Endless One [Justice League Of America #??]
A91. Firestar [ ?? ]
A101. Godiva [Super Friends #7]
A103. Golden Gladiator [The Brave And The Bold [1st series] #1]
A107+. the Green Team [1st Issue Special #2, Cancelled Comic Cavalcade #1, Advs Of Superman #549]
A110. the Hacker Files [The Hacker Files #1]
A111+. Hazard [ ?? ]
A114+. the heroes of the Microcosmos [Justice League Of America #213-#215]
A115. the Homeless Avenger [Vigilante #48]
A117. the Human Cannonball [Superman Family #188]
A121. Hyperboy, Hyperdog, and the Hyper-Family of Trombus [Superboy [1st series] #144]
A129. the Intergalactic Vigilante Squadron [Adventure Comics #237]
A131. Isis [The Shazam!/Isis Hour 1976 live-action show; Shazam! #25]
A131++. Jack O'Lantern I - III [Super Friends #8; Justice League Europe Annual #1; Justice League International Quarterly #14]
A135. Jemm, Son of Saturn [Jemm, Son Of Saturn #1]
A141+. the Justice Experience [Chase #6; Martian Manhunter [2nd series] #17,20,22,36]
A144. the Knights of the Galaxy [Mystery In Space #1]
A145. Kolossal Kate [Flash [1st series] #211]
A149. Lando, Man of Magic [World's Best Comics #1]
A152. the Liquidator [Aquaman [1st series] #38]
A153. Little Miss Redhead [Sensation Comics #72]
A156. Lu-Shu Shan / I-Ching [Wonder Woman [1st series] #179]
A162. Marsboy [Superboy [1st series] #14, #16; Adventure Comics #195]
A169. Mighty Man [ ?? ]
A171. Minstrel Maverick [All-American Western #103]
A178. Mystek [Ray [2nd series] #12?-#13?; Justice League Task Force #30-#32]
A179. Nadir, Master of Magic [New Adventure Comics #17]
A180. Neolla, the Superwoman of Zorkia [Action Comics #354]
A183. Nightwolf [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #323]
A185. Nubia [Wonder Woman [1st series] #204]
A192+. Overthrow [ ?? ]
A193. Owlwoman [Super Friends #7]
A196. Petronius [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #3]
A197. the Planeteers [Real Fact Comics #16 ?]
A199. Power Lad [Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #45]
A201. Power-Man, King of Outer-Space [Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane #??]
A209. Pulsar [New Adventures of Superboy #31]
A215+. Ringmaster [Flash v1 #261-#264]
A225. Seraph [Super Friends #7]
A233. the Sino-Supermen [Batman Family #19; Detective Comics #481-#482]
A241. Sonik [World's Finest Comics [1st series] #310]
A251+. Starman (Mikaal Tomas) [1st Issue Special #12, Starman v2 series]
A260. Superwoman (Kristen Wells) [DC Comics Presents Annual #2]
A272. the Third Archer (Andre Reynard) [Adventure Comics #162]
A275. Thunderlord [Super Friends #8]
A288. Ultraa (post-Crisis) [Justice League International [Quarterly] #13]
A293. the Viking Commando [All Out War #1]
A293++. the Waterfront Warrior [Huntress v1 series]
A293+++. Watt the Question Man [All-Flash #?]
A297. Wild Dog [Wild Dog #1]
A300. the Wonder Twins (pre-Crisis) and Gleek [The All-New Super Friends Hour 1977 cartoon; Super Friends #7]
A301. the Wonder Twins (post-Crisis) [Extreme Justice #9]
A302. the Wyoming Kid [Western Comics #1]



The Vigilante
Member
posted January 20, 2002 03:03 PM

THE BAT-SQUAD (from http://members.tripod.com/originalvigilante/index.html )

The Bat-Squad was a rather interesting group of folks: Three Brits who got involved with the Batman on a case in London, England. Unfortunately they only appeared once, in The Brave and The Bold #92.

Bruce Wayne was in London for the filming of Basil Coventry's movie, "The Scarlet Strangler", based on a real-life Jack-the-Ripper-esque murderer. Margo Cantrell was on the set as script girl and stand-in for star Vivien Tremaine. Former Scotland Yard Inspector Major Dabney was on hand as technical advisor, and Mick Murdock, who had been pinched in the past by Dabney, was there to play weird "grotty" music to get the actors in the right mood.

During the filming of the first scene, however, the "Strangler" kidnaps Vivien, and the actor playing the Strangler, Ronald Dawson, is found murdered, which prompts an appearance by Batman. The Caped Crusader follows the available clues and is nearly killed by the Strangler himself, with Dabney's timely appearance saving his life. Mick and Batman later prevent Margo's kidnapping by the strong madman, as Dabney discovers that a piece of cloth from the killer indicates he was in the cellar of the Half Moon Inn (due to the kind of beetles on it). The Bat Squad converges there and discovers Vivien chained in a recess, and apparently of the belief that she is Lucy Crown, one of the Strangler's real-life victims. Mick believes this and several other occurrences mean that they have all traveled back in time to 1906.

Outside the Inn, the team sees the Strangler throw Coventry into the river, but when Batman approaches, Coventry himself leaps insanely from the shadows. He and Batman crash through the rotting floorboards into the cellar, where an unexploded bomb from the blitz of the World War pins down Batman. The sight of the swastika on the bomb brings Coventry back to reality, and Dabney and Mick arrive to assist the Dark Knight. With Dabney's instructions, Mick's nimble fingers fail to defuse the bomb and the pair flee, only to hear an explosion soon after. Batman walks out of the fog, having freed himself by digging into the wall and letting the river water buoy the bomb away from him.

Coventry explained that the original Scarlet Strangler was actually his grandfather. His father feared that he too would become like him and was committed to an asylum, and an uncle raised Coventry. Coventry discovered his heritage and wanted to make a movie about it. His father found out about it and went insane, thinking he was indeed the Strangler. He abducted Vivien and killed her co-star, and Coventry also cracked under the strain, but managed to kill his father (his body was the one thrown into the water). Mick refers to their little assemblage as the Bat-Squad, and they all hope they can team up again "some ruddy day".

COMMENTS:
This was actually a very good, though a little cliched, story, mainly because of the realistic characterizations of the Bat-Squad members. To be honest, I've always sort of thought that "The Bat-Squad" monicker was applied just so this mystery story could be used as a team-up in The Brave and The Bold, instead of say, Detective Comics. Still, it's sad that Margo, Mick and Inspector Dabney never appeared again...they were definitely a better representation of Great Britain then, say, that horrid "Londinium" journey the TV Batman, Robin and Batgirl took in their final season. And they probably never will be see again outside of a reprint collection, given the rather skewed tastes of the American comic buyer nowadays (unless somehow Geoff Johns or Kurt Busiek takes a hankering to the trio).

APPEARANCES:
THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD #92
October-November, 1970
Batman and the Bat-Squad in "Night Wears a Scarlet Shroud"
Cover by: Nick Cardy
Script by: Bob Haney
Art by: Nick Cardy



The Vigilante
Member
posted January 21, 2002 07:56 AM

A115: The Homeless Avenger

The Homeless Avenger was an unnamed vigilante who took vengeance upon those criminals who preyed upon the homeless in New York City. The Homeless Avenger would stop crimes against the homeless and then kill the perpetrators, usually using whatever weapons the criminals had intended to use to threaten their victims.

The Vigilante and Black Thorn went out on the Homeless Avenger's trail, but received little help from the homeless community itself, who viewed the masked man as a hero and a protector. Black Thorn wanted to use force to get information from the homeless men and women, but Vigilante refused to let her do so.

In the mean time, the Homeless Avenger stopped a homeless man from being killed by a thug in the subway, throwing the miscreant on the tracks in front of a train. The homeless man, obviously confused and mentally ill, took out a gun and shot the Homeless Avenger in the shoulder. While fleeing the scene, a Subway cop tried to apprehend the masked man, but in the scuffle the Homeless Avenger killed the officer with his own gun and fled the scene.

After an argument on the ethics of the case with the Vigilante, Black Thorn went out on her own to extract information from the homelss people who had refused to help them earlier. She almost caught up with the Homeless Avenger on a rooftop, but he unknowingly eluded her (after tossing an attack off the roof). Black Thorn didn't know (or care) that the Vigilante was pursuing her as well.

Later that morning in Grand Central Station, a bunch of thugs accosted a homeless man sleeping against the wall, not realizing it was actually the Homeless Avenger. He killed one of them and announced himself to the whole terminal, which roused nearly thirty creeps who had known people the Homeless Avenger had killed. As they were about to attack him, Black Thorn arrived and knocked out five of the attackers with tranq thorns, wanting to collar the Homeles Avenger herself. As she turned her gun on the Homeless Avenger, the Vigilante's nunchakus flew out and knocked her weapon out of her hand.

As the rest of the terminal watched, the Vigilante and Black Thorn argued and then fought, with the Vigilante finally knocking her out. The Vigilante offered his help to the Homeless Avenger against the crowd closing in on him, but the masked man refused, saying that the Vigilante had done enough already. The Vigilante left carrying Black Thorn.

The newspaper headline the next day announced that the Homeless Avenger had been slain in the subway.

Comments:
There were really very few details ever given about the Homeless Avenger. We were never even told his real name. All we know is that he was a fairly good hand-to-hand combatant and that he had a dedication to returning dignity and respect to the many homeless people who inhabited New York City. A truly noble cause, though definitely NOT enough to justify the extremes that he went to in order to achieve it.

The Homeless Avenger incident was one of the last in a series of events that brought Adrian Chase's career as the Vigilante to an end. After allowing a police officer to fall to his death in VIGILANTE #37, Chase's mind and dedication to his role as the Vigilante was slowly eroding as he found himself becoming nothing more than a costumed killer. After escaping the authorities one final time, and apparently killing a police detective that he knew back when he was a District Attorney, Adrian Chase committed suicide in order to stop himself from becoming everything he most hated.

Appearances:
Vigilante #48 (December 1987)
Vigilante #49 (January 1988)
Vigilante #50 (February 1988 - mention on first page only)

----
Rich



erdmann
Member
posted January 21, 2002 11:38 AM

Name: “Kolossal” Kate Krasher (alias, real name unknown)
First appearance: “Flashing Wheels” by Cary Bates (Script), Irv Novick (Pencils), Dick Giordano (Inks), FLASH vol. 1, #211 (Dec. 1971).

Synopsis: While researching a story on a new Roller Derby sensation, Iris Allen joins an opposing team and goes up against Kate Krasher, a woman Barry Allen describes as “an Amazon” who “must weigh a hefty 300 pounds.” Kate promptly clobbers Iris. Semi-conscious, Iris looks at Krasher as she skates away, but instead sees a “grotesque, monstrous alien.”

The next night, Central City is rocked by an earthquake. The Flash spends the evening shoring up buildings, cleaning up debris and rescuing folks from peril. He then visits the Institute of Science where he learns earthquakes are impossible in Central City because of the many layers of strong bedrock beneath it. He also learns that the epicenter of the quake was Broadway and Main, the site of the Roller Derby rink.

Investigating at the rink, Flash discovers oddly glowing roller skates that contain strange devices. Struck in the head, Flash identifies his attacker as the same creature Iris saw just before he blacks out.

Flash awakens to find himself trapped by Krasher, who explains she is an alien sent to destroy Earth. Her own world is dying from “natural and unnatural causes,” she her people have decided to build a new planet. But first, they must acquire raw materials by blowing up Earth.

The Roller Derby rink is actually the top of a “gigantic energi-coil” which winds down to Earth’s core. The motion of the special skates going round and round on the rink’s floor powers to coil, she explains, and soon, it will have enough power to cause internal vibrations that will shake Earth to pieces.

Flash breaks his bonds and dons a pair of skates. Skating counter-clockwise at super-speed, he hopes to undo the damage Krasher has caused. Then, as the Earth trembles, Flash realizes he has been going the wrong way and has actually sped up the end of the world. Quickly, Flash grabs nine more pairs of skates and begins skating clockwise so fast that he is able to keep all 10 pairs going at once. Earth is saved and Krasher trips over a pair of skates, allowing Flash to capture her and turn her over to the police.

It should be pointed out that Krasher is called Kolossal Kate on the cover only. The name “Kolossal” Kate Krasher appears on a poster, but otherwise, she is referred to as “Kate Krasher” incessantly throughout the story.

Also interesting is the fact that the Kate on the cover, drawn by Giordano, bears no resemblance to the character in the book. One the cover she is sneering at Flash, but still looks female. In the book, she appears to be a husky, ugly man.

Was this Kolossal Kate’s only appearance? As the police take Katie away, Flash muses, “Something tell me I haven’t seen the last of ‘Kate Krasher’ -- or her race of determined Earth-killers.”

Had he?


FLASH #211 also features a much better Golden Age reprint in which Jay Garrick meets the Rival (from FLASH COMICS #104, Feb. 1949).

Rival would also qualify as an obscure character if not for his reappearance in the pages of JSA during the Injustice Society/King of Tears storyline. Although, if #104 hadn’t been the last Golden Age issue of FLASH COMICS, he might have become Jay’s Professor Zoom. That would have been fitting, considering Rival’s true identity.

In the story, Jay and Joan Williams are on hand to welcome back to America their old chemistry teacher Dr. Clarris. But Clarris is kidnapped by a gang with speed powers on par with the Flash.

The gang, working for the mysterious Rival, begin a reign of crime in Keystone City, while Joan makes a confession to Jay. Nine years earlier, not long after he became the Flash, Joan had proudly boasted of his secret to a college classmate. Perhaps the classmate, Jon Burnes, had found a way to duplicate Flash’s speed.

Flash talks to Burnes, but he doesn’t remember Joan, much less their conversation. Soon, Flash is overcome by the speeding criminals and taken before their boss. Rival dresses like Flash, except his shirt appears to be black with red highlights and his pants are black with blue highlights. He wears a black mask beneath his helmet.

Rival exposes Flash to a gas that makes his body and mind move in slow motion, then resumes his criminal activities, certain no one can stop him. Flash, however, recreates the incident that gave him his powers in the first place and is restored.

Meanwhile, the gang slows down and Rival explains his speed formula is only temporary. Before they can get another dose, Flash shows up and defeats them all. He unmasks Rival, who is actually the elderly Clarris. He had overheard Joan telling Burnes how Flash gained his powers, but not what his real identity was. He assumed the hero was a student who entered the lab after Garrick’s accident.

According to the modern JSA tale, Rival regained his speed powers and became a reoccurring threat to Flash. He later became trapped in the Speed Force for decades and was freed by Johnny Sorrow.



erdmann
Member
posted January 21, 2002 10:36 PM

Name: Superwoman
Real Name: Kristin Wells
Occupation: College Professor/Adventurer
Base of operations: Metropolis in the 1980s and the 2860s.
Powers: Decorporealization, teleportation, super-strength, flight, emotion sensing, limited intuition, “hole poking” (ability to create time/space warps) and invulnerability.
First appearance: “The Last Secret Identity”, DC Comics Presents Annual #2 (1983)
Last known appearance: “Welcome to Luthorcon III”, DC Comics Presents Annual #4 (1985)

The story of Superwoman actually begins during Elliot S! Maggin’s tenure as a Superman writer in the late 1970s when he wrote a story entitled “The Miracle of Thirsty Thursday.” It featured a time-traveling college history student named Joanne Jaime and later served as the basis of Maggin’s 1981 Superman novel “Miracle Monday.”

In the novel, the student’s name was changed to Kristin Wells and she traveled from the 29th Century to learn to origins of the “interplanetary holiday” Miracle Monday (celebrated the third Monday in May).

Superman editor Julius Schwartz apparently enjoyed the book, so Maggin pitched a story bringing Wells, now a young professor at Columbia University-Metropolis, into comic book continuity.

DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #2 (by Maggin, Keith Pollard and Mike DeCarlo) opens in September 2862 and shows Wells, an attractive, freckle-faced red-head, teaching class (you know it’s the future because she wears a leotard and knee boots to class). She and her students are discussing Superwoman, “quite possibly the greatest heroine of the 20th Century” and the only super-hero whose secret identity has never been unearthed.

Students offer suggestions about how Superwoman performed her feats and a handy chart is displayed showing her powers and the 29th Century tech that could duplicate them. One proposes Wells travel back to the day Superwoman first appeared and learn her identity.

Back in 1983, Wells takes a job as a typist working on Lois Lane’s new book (she took the liberty of typing it before she left the future) and gets hit on by Jimmy Olsen.

She discovers Superwoman’s costume in a closet. It is red and blue with the familiar S-shield, blue gloves and boots, a blue cap and a blue hood. Wells first suspects Lois, then Lana Lang of being Superwoman, then learns the outfit is for Clark Kent’s cousin, Linda (Supergirl) Danvers to wear to Morgan Edge’s costume party. Wells decides Linda will become Superwoman.

Meanwhile, King Kosmos, a time and space-faring tyrant from an alternative future, arrives and threats to conquer Earth. Knowing that Superwoman is supposed to aid Superman against Kosmos, Wells tries and fails to enlist the aid of her candidates (Linda, in an effort to see how the other half lives, is flying to Metropolis from Chicago via jet and is unreachable). Kosmos blasts Superman back to the 6th Century, then withdraws to make new plans. Superman flies back to the present under his own power in time for the party.

At the party, Wells is shocked that Linda chose to wear something that did not conceal her face instead of the Superwoman garb. Kosmos attacks again, incapacitating Superman and the Justice League and leaving Wells no choice but to don the Superwoman costume herself.

Joined by a recovering Superman, Superwoman takes her battle against Kosmos to present-day Dallas, then to Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865, and finally to the timestream. There, Superwoman blasts Kosmos’ navigational controller from his hand and when he tries to evade Superman, he tumbles “out of control, in and out of the folds in time and space.” He will return, however, Superwoman warns.

Her task completed, Wells returns to the future to reveal that she was Superwoman. First, however, she discourages Jimmy once and for all by kissing Clark. After all, it wouldn’t do for him to fall for the great-great- granddaughter of Jimmy Olsen IV.

In DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #4, three years have passed in the 29th Century. Wells has gained a beau in fellow professor Barry Elkin and a second career as a beloved interplanetary super-hero. Again her civvies remind us that this is the future; she dresses like an extra from a Billy Idol video.

In this story, by Maggin, Barreto and Ordway, Wells attempts to travel back to 1985, but is caught in a “chrono-synclastic infundibulum” which means her body makes it back to the past, but most of her memories are stuck in the time vortex, only slowly trickling back to her. During the course of the tale, she remembers only her name, that she is Superwoman and that she is from some time in the future.

Confused, Wells is accosted by a boy handing out flyers for Luthorcon III, “a celebration of villainy and the absurd.” His irresistible pitch: “Hey, lady, you look flaky... weird. You should be going to Luthorcon” is all it takes. She dons her Superwoman costume and heads to the convention center.

Meanwhile, Superman rescues actor Gregory Reed from a car accident. Reed suffers a mild concussion, meaning he can’t appear as Superman at Luthorcon. Superman decides to take his place. Of course, Lex Luthor has prepared for this and is on hand disguised as a food vendor. He substitutes a chunk of green Kryptonite for the prop the organizers plan to use in a scene with Reed.

When the time comes to play his part, Superman is overcome by the green K, but no one realizes he isn’t acting. Spotting Superwoman and recognizing her as the real McCoy, he telepathically (?) begs for help. Remembering she is a hero, Superwoman saves Superman, only to learn that Luthor isn’t finished yet.

The bald baddie orders Superman to voluntarily expose himself to Kryptonite or he will teleport Metropolis to “a hostile dimension.” However, when Luthor throws the switch, Superwoman shifts the dimensional door so that instead of swallowing the city, it pulls in only Luthor and his hideout.

After that, we learn that Superwoman would spend several years in the 20th Century, fighting next to Superman and the Green Lantern Corps and earning a medal from President Reagan. Finally, she remembers how to get home and returns there, years after her departure, to find Elkin still waiting.

To date, none of the amazing adventures Superwoman was to have seen print - and it seems unlikely they ever will. Even as Kristin Wells was establishing herself in the modern DC Universe, that universe was being forever altered by the Crisis. Curiously, “the greatest heroine of the 20th Century” took no part in battling the greatest threat to the universe, unless Perez slipped her into the background somewhere.

Perhaps Kristin could have filled the void left by the death of Supergirl, but instead, she was cast aside into discontinuity with Streaky and Beppo when Superman was rebooted in 1986. Superwoman didn’t even merit a listing in WHO'S WHO that year.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 24, 2002 07:53 PM

Almost in time to coincide with the conclusion of their story in current issues of GREEN ARROW, I give you the unofficial STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER biography.


STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER:

Created by Arnold Drake and Bob Oksner

First appearance: THE FOX AND THE CROW #95, December 1965-January 1966.

Personal data:

STANLEY:
Alter ego: Stanley Dover Jr.
Occupation: Kid
Known relatives: Sheila Dover (mother), Mitchell Dover (father), Stanley Dover Sr. (maternal grandfather, deceased), Marge Dover (maternal grandmother, deceased)
Group affiliation: None
Base of operations: The suburbs of Star City
Height: N/A
Weight: N/A
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Blond
Skin: Caucasian white

THE MONSTER:
Alter ego: Unnamed. Sometimes known as "The Beast With No Name", "Massachusetts", "Spot", or "Thpot"
Occupation: Dog. Expelled Demon of Hell.
Known relatives: None
Group affiliation: Demons of Hell
Base of operations: Formerly Hell, currently the suburbs of Star City
Height: N/A
Weight: N/A
Eyes: Black
Hair: Magenta (all over his body)
Skin: Furry

History:

The story about Stanley and his Monster is actually two stories. One, an innocent fairytale about a boy and his dog. The other, a considerably darker tale about arts arcane and evil personified.

It starts with an entirely different Stanley. A monster in his own right.

Growing up in an American suburban area in the 1950s, Stanley Dover Sr. was seemingly the most decent citizen anyone could imagine. He was married to a beautiful woman and housewife named Marge, he had a decent job as a postman, was a good neighbour, and went to church every Sunday.

However, the bright idyll of the 1950s could cast a dark and twisted shadow. After a few years of marriage, Stanley and Marge were drawn into Satanist circles by one of their friends. Although most of the Satanic worshippers in their "club" - including Marge - saw the practicing of arcane arts mainly as a way of "letting loose", a way of breaking the taboos of the Truman era and engaging themselves in group sex sessions, for Stanley Dover it became much more. He deeply wanted to serve the Dark Powers and use them for his own satisfaction. Ultimately, he was captivated by the promise of life eternal - and by that, he did not mean in the hereafter, as most religions promised.

Marge didn't think much about Stanley's serious dedication, not until the day she found that she was pregnant, and suggested to Stanley that it was time to grow up and leave the Church of Satan. Stanley could not believe it. There was not a chance that they would abandon the church for the sake of the child - on the contrary, the newborn child was going to be sacrificed in the name of Satan. The very next day, a death-scared Mary fled the neighbourhood, and Stanley never saw her again. (GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #9, December 2001)

Bitter and disappointed, Dover travelled to England to study the science of the supernatural and socialize with well-known occultists, such as Jason Blood and Alexander Burgess. It was in the Burgess Estate in Wych Cross, that Stanley Dover had an encounter that would forever change his life.

In the early 1920s, Alexander Burgess' father, the magus Roderick Burgess, had attempted to capture Death herself, but instead got hold of Death's little brother - Dream of the Endless. For decades, the Roderick family had kept the so-called Sandman in a glass cage in their basement, and now, in the late 1960s, Stanley Dover snuck a peek of him. Not knowing who the strange creature was, Dover was still impressed by the capturing of a being that he sensed had great power. It was rumored that Burgess' ancient book known as the Magdalene Grimoire had been crucial to the capturing, and Dover, not above stealing when it suited his purposes, returned to the United States with the unholy book in hand. The Magdalene Grimoire provided Dover with enough wealth to set himself up in style in Star City, but, like Burgess, he never succeeded in capturing Death. (GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #9, December 2001, THE SANDMAN (vol. 2) #1, January 1989)

In 1985, life took an unexpected turn for Dover. Knocking at his door was a woman named Sheila, who introduced herself as the daughter he had never seen. Sheila explained that Marge had been dead for many years, that she herself had been brought up by her aunt, and that her boyfriend Mitch had advised her to seek out her long-lost father. She did not know why her parents have separated, but wanted to get back to her roots, her family. Pretending to be touched by her tears, Dover decided to play the good father.

Some years later, Sheila gave birth to Stanley Dover Jr., giving old Stanley the perfect cover for his wicked activities. While the parents was at work, grampa Stanley looked after his grandson at the same time that he attempted to arise creatures of Hell. The ancient chants and spells of the Magdalene Grimoire served as lullabies for the baby Stanley, something that old Stanley remembered as something rather cute later in his life. And on the surface, the family life was both very cute and very happy. (GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #9, December 2001)

Young Stanley grew up in the happy suburbs of Star City with his caring parents, Sheila and Mitchell Dover. (A modern man, Mitch had agreed on taking his wife's family name.) Except for Sheila's sad childhood, the Dovers were probably the most typical suburban couple you'll ever find - in the most positive meaning of the word. Caring, intelligent and fun-loving people, fond of gardening, barbecues and socializing with their neighbours. They still love each other and experience no marital difficulties except for the occasional quarrel. And they are both starting to gain weight. Neither of them has been involved in any criminal affairs...and none of them has ever joined any Satanic church.

Stanley was (and is still) the Dovers' only child, something that has not seemed to make him a spoilt brat. Actually, Stanley is a lovable kid, who dreams of becoming either a professional wrestler or a super-hero as a grown-up. Early in his life, his parents realized that he was quite intelligent. For example, he learned how to read and write before he was five years old.

Nevertheless, at the age of five, Stanley was a very lonely boy. He had no siblings. No other kids his own age lived in his neighbourhood. He found some content in comic books and his own wild flights of imagination, but longed for company. He wanted a dog, but was allergic to them. Things looked bleak...until one day, while he was chasing a baseball down a sewer, and actually found the dog he had longed for. Or...it was not quite a dog. It was something even better. A genuine monster!

What Stanley did not know at the time, was that the Monster in question was actually a demon - a nameless creature that had been banished from Hell by Lucifer himself, just because he was, well, too nice to be there. He had treated his fellow demons with love and respect, given solace to the damned, and pasted "have a nice day" stickers all over the city of Dis. These actions drew the attention and awakened the anger of Lucifer, who decided that the nameless one should be banished to Earth. That would teach him some manners.

Lucifer's plan almost succeeded. Wherever the Monster moved on Earth, he was feared and hated by ignorant humans. Frustrated and angered, the Monster had probably chosen the path of evil, were it not for the interference of the good-hearted and innocent Stanley.

Stanley did what any normal five-year-old would have done - he befriended the Monster and took it home. The lonely Monster despised the fact that he scared people, and was more than happy to be Stanley's "dog" and friend. And since he had no name, Stanley gave him one. Although the Monster would have preferred "Massachusetts", he was content with Stanley calling him "Spot" - or "Thpot" as the kid pronounced it (he had a lisp in those days).

When Stanley asked his parents if he could keep a Monster he had found, they gladly agreed, more than happy that their son could be so satisfied with an imaginary friend. Even to this day, the Dovers have not actually seen the Monster, and, just like the parents of "Calvin and Hobbes", they believe it to be a figment of Stanley's imagination. For months, even years, Stanley has kept the Monster in his bedroom, hiding him under the bed in times of crisis (and ignoring the fact that this should be topologically impossible). (THE FOX AND THE CROW #95, January 1966; SECRET ORIGINS #48, April 1990; WHO'S WHO IN THE DC UNIVERSE #1, August 1990)

As time went by, Stanley and his Monster embarked on many fun adventures together, developing a deep and sincere friendship. Whatever would happen, they promised never to leave each other. (THE FOX AND THE CROW #96 - STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (vol. 1) #112, February 1966 - November 1968.) However, Hell's rulers would not agree on that bargain. During this time, a weary Lucifer had abdicated and abandoned Hell. The infernal realm was now under Heaven's control, and the punishment of the damned overseen by the angels Remiel and Duma. (THE SANDMAN (vol. 2) #28, July 1991) The Hell's Angels did not like the thought of having demons running around on Earth, and decided to send out agents to fetch them all, the unnamed one included. Some escapees, like Lord Asteroth, were collected by Etrigan, who had been appointed "Hitman of Hell" at the time. (THE DEMON (vol. 3) #42-45, 1994) Others, like Anton Arcane, were brought back by Agony & Ecstasty, Hell's inquisitional "police". (SWAMP THING (vol. 2) #125, November 1992, #136-138, October-December 1993.)

To collect Stanley's Monster, the Angels appointed the female rhyming demon known as Nyx, who was sent to Earth and invaded the Dover household. With the help of the Phantom Stranger and the mysterious Ambrose Bierce (a John Constantine-wannabee), Stanley and his Monster were able to avert the danger, and the Monster was ultimately allowed to stay on Earth. Stanley's parents were introduced to the Monster and encountered a lot of weirdness during this time, but their memories of the whole event were soon erased. Life in the suburbs returned to normal. Such as "normal" was. (STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (vol. 2) #1-4, February-May 1993)

Time went by. Stanley grew older and went to school, and his parents got increasingly worried about him never outgrowing his "imaginary friend". They asked grampa Stanley if he couldn't talk to the boy. Stanley Sr., still playing the part of the good grandfather, agreed, just as happily as Stanley Jr. agreed to introduce his grandfather to his "friend". What Stanley Sr. had not anticipated, was that his grandson's imaginary friend was real. And that he suddenly would stand eye to eye with a demon of Hell.

Old Stanley recognized the Monster instantly. This was the one who in his arcane books was referred to as "the Beast With No Name" - a creature that would be forced to do the bidding of any human being that gained control over it. Stanley Sr. had been trying to summon the creature for years, often while taking care of little Stanley, and now realized that he had succeeded, indirectly and unknowingly, by transferring the curse to his grandson. Astonished, old Stanley asked his grandson to go get him a glass of water while he got "acquainted" with the magenta-colored Monster.

He had only turned away for a couple of seconds, but that was enough for the repulsed Monster to flee the Dover household. Furious about having been so close to the goal, and that the creature still would elude his grasp, old Stanley finally revealed to his grandson what kind of person he really was.

Old Stanley kidnapped young Stanley and imprisoned him in the basement of his big Star City mansion. Reasoning that hurting the child would be the only sure way to lure the demon out from hiding, the old mage started a wicked scheme to get the Monster's attention. He contained his grandson in a glass cage (similar to the one he had seen in the Burgess Estate), dressed him up as the Monster, and fed him only the blood of children who had been innocently killed by Stanley Sr. on the streets of Star City. Infamously known as "the Star City Slayer", the seemingly mild-mannered old man was never suspected to be guilty of the murders, or, for that matter, the disappearance of young Stanley. However, his plan didn't work. The Monster did not appear and Stanley Sr. was becoming increasingly frustrated.

Ironically, the Star City Slayer almost fell prey to street violence himself when Stanley Sr. was assaulted by robbers one night. To his surprise, he was saved by a delirious Green Arrow. The original Green Arrow, Oliver Queen, who everybody believed to be dead. In fact, the real Oliver Queen was still dead. Stanley Sr., who had studied occultism for decades, recognized this Green Arrow as a "hollow" - a creature with the body and mind of a living man, but no soul. It was later revealed that this "Ollie" was a creation by Hal Jordan, the Spectre, who believed that his former friend deserved a second life. Ollie's soul, on the other hand, was still in Heaven, and refused to inhabit the new body.

However, this was not known to Stanley Dover Sr. at the time. He only realized that this soulless "Green Arrow" could be a valuable instrument for him in his evil mission. He befriending the confused, soulless hero (who didn't realize that he was anything less than the real thing), offering him food, clothes, a sanctuary, and, above all, friendship. While "Green Arrow" resumed his hero career, Stanley Sr. played the role of Ollie's old, good-hearted, gay friend.

While adventuring, the soulless Ollie gradually learned more about what he really was. Afraid that his plan would fail if the hollow learned too much about itself, Stanley Sr. put his plan in motion, trapping Ollie and his young friend Mia in the basement where Stanley Sr. was already held captive. Here, Stanley Sr. revealed the plan he had had since the day he met Ollie: he was to mystically transfer his own soul to the soulless body. In the shape of the Green Arrow, he could infiltrate the JLA HQ, and thus get the means to locate the missing demon who could provide him with everything...perhaps even life eternal. It was a convoluted and far-fetched plan, but Stanley Sr., mad and power-hungry, really believed it would work. (GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #9, December 2001)

The soulless Ollie was just about to be killed when fate intervened in the form of Oliver's son, Connor Hawke, the second Green Arrow, who entered the building in an attempt to free the captives. Of course, Stanley Sr. was not unprepared, but unleashed a cadre of demons to fight the young archer. Feeling that Connor had no chance to survive this fight, the soul of Oliver Queen finally returned to the "hollow" body, making the original Green Arrow "whole" again. Soon, the first and second Green Arrow stood side by side, battling the minions of Hell. Finding themselves outnumbered, they were ready to sacrifice themselves and save the world by letting the JLA destroy the building with them in it.

At the last second, Stanley's Monster actually turned up and succeeded in sending the other demons back to Hell. He saved the Green Arrows, freed young Stanley from captivity, and punished the old Stanley with the words:
"You dreamed of mastering me, didn't you? Of inhabiting me…as you intended to inhabit Mister Queen over there. You wanna get inside me? Fine."
A screaming Stanley Dover Sr. was then devoured by the Beast.

Oliver, Connor, Mia, and Stanley Jr. were all freed from their imprisonment and returned to their respective lives.

The reunion of Stanley and his Monster was a sweet one, with the Monster erasing the painful memories of abuse from Stanley's mind. They returned to the simple life of building forts and climbing trees - and their mutual satisfaction of forever being each others' heroes. (GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #10, January 2002)

Powers, skills, and weapons:

Stanley Dover Jr. is a typical boy of his age. He has no meta-gene, no extraordinary abilities, and does not know any martial arts. He is highly intelligent and rather hyperactive.

Before he was banished to Earth, the Monster had demonic powers of a fairly high caliber. Most of them were stripped from him as part of his punishment. He has working knowledge of magic, but is mostly incapable of using it since his Earthly exile. However, he can recognize other Demons, no matter how well they are disguised. He has also been able to conduct other mystic feats at occasions, such as the time when he closed old Stanley's doorway to Hell, and erased Young Stanley's painful memories. The Monster is vulnerable to magic spells, and certain mystical objects and substances (such as holy water).

The Monster still has superior strength and an incredibly high threshold of pain. He is impervious to cold and fire. He has good night vision. His diet consists mainly of poisons, toxic wastes, garbage, and trash (which makes him come in handy on cleaning day). He has an adverse effect on normal animals, who are terrified of him and will run away, no matter how well trained. He can be hurt by heavy-duty weapons, but will heal completely unless they've been blessed. He has no extensive knowledge of weaponry, but if called upon, can wield a mean pitchfork. His claws can rip through concrete and his teeth can bite through an inch of Steel (though they'll smart a bit afterward). Despite his appearance, he can move swiftly, and delicately if the need arises. (WHO'S WHO IN THE DC UNIVERSE #1, August 1990; GREEN ARROW (vol. 3) #10, January 2002)

Appearances in chronological order:

THE FOX AND THE CROW #95, December 1965-January 1966
THE FOX AND THE CROW #96
THE FOX AND THE CROW #97
THE FOX AND THE CROW #98
THE FOX AND THE CROW #99
THE FOX AND THE CROW #100
THE FOX AND THE CROW #101
THE FOX AND THE CROW #102
THE FOX AND THE CROW #103
THE FOX AND THE CROW #104
THE FOX AND THE CROW #105
THE FOX AND THE CROW #106
THE FOX AND THE CROW #107
THE FOX AND THE CROW #108
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 1) #109, April-May 1968
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 1) #110, June-July 1968
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 1) #111, August-September 1968
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 1) #112, October-November 1968
THE BEST OF DC #49, June 1984 (reprint)
SECRET ORIGINS (Vol. 3) #48, April 1990
WHO'S WHO IN THE DC UNIVERSE #1, August 1990 (fact page)
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 2) #1, February 1993 (also a background article)
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 2) #2, March 1993
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 2) #3, April 1993
STANLEY AND HIS MONSTER (Vol. 2) #4, May 1993
CONJURORS #1, April 1999 (Elseworlds)
CONJURORS #2, May 1999 (Elseworlds)
CONJURORS #3, June 1999 (Elseworlds)
GREEN ARROW (Vol. 3) #2, May 2001 (Stanley only, dressed up as the Monster)
GREEN ARROW (Vol. 3) #8, November 2001 (Stanley only)
GREEN ARROW (Vol. 3) #9, December 2001
GREEN ARROW (Vol. 3) #10, January 2002

/ola



Tenzel Kim
Member
posted January 26, 2002 02:15 PM

Way back in November I asked if I could be allowed to use the profiles that were presented here on my site "The Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe" and while outpost2 gave me permission that is now three months back and I've done nothing to actually make it happen since then so he might have changed his mind.

Therefore I'd like to pose the question once again. I've recently been very busy getting the index and character chronology parts of the site updated and back on track but as a result the profile updates and additions have been taking a back seat. Right now we're working on a way to get this part of the Guide back on track and I considering the great work being done here I'd be very interested in showcasing it.

However, to make the profiles work for my format they will have to be slightly changed and I hope this would be ok. I've made an example of how one such profile might end up based on erdmann's Superwoman biography. I've changed it all to past tense and corrected a few things here and there and added a bit more, which is probably the way I'd do it unless they were already written with the Guide format in mind as in the case of Hellstone's profiles for instance.

If you give me the go-ahead, I'll upload the profile and post a link here so that the author of the profile can correct any mistakes and comment on the profile before I make it official on the site itself.

Let me know what you think of the idea.

The Superwoman biography test can be found at
http://www.comicboards.com/dcguide/Who/Superwoman_Bio.htm

A short note to erdmann: I hope it is ok I used your profile as an example. If not I'll remove it right away.

Tenz.

The Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe
http://www.comicboards.com/dcguide/



outpost2
Member
posted January 26, 2002 03:40 PM

Tenz, the offer still stands. Modify my entries as you see fit.

One addition to the Superwoman entry: She also made an appearance in the two-part "Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow?" storyline from SUPERMAN v1 #423 (Sep 1986) and ACTION COMICS #583 (Sep 1986). I know she definitely appeared in the second part, don't recall offhand if she was in part one as well.



Tenzel Kim
Member
posted January 26, 2002 05:30 PM

Originally posted by outpost2:


Tenz, the offer still stands. Modify my entries as you see fit.

Cool. Thanks. I'll go to work on those this weekend.



One addition to the Superwoman entry: She also made an appearance in the two-part "Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow?" storyline from SUPERMAN v1 #423 (Sep 1986) and ACTION COMICS #583 (Sep 1986). I know she definitely appeared in the second part, don't recall offhand if she was in part one as well.

The reason that appearance is not listed is that it is not in continuity, as "Whatever..." was an imaginary story. I haven't figured out how best to incorporate out of continuity appearances yet. As soon as I do that will be included. I have made a note of it.

Tenz.



Koppy McFad
New Member
posted January 26, 2002 10:42 PM

SONIK
(not the hedgehog)

To my knowledge, he made only two appearances in the 1985 run of WORLD'S FINEST. Both were written by Joey Cavalieri so I assume he created the character.

Real name: William Parker, a black man who heads a boy's club in an unspecified ghetto (but a very well-integrated ghetto with black, white and hispanic street kids) He was also some sort of engineer specializing in sound although he is never seen working for a stereo company or at any job related to this skill.

Sonik was a very earnest, "socially-relevant" though uncompelling character. His two appearances are pretty low-profile and he largely refrained from violence. His costume was a yellow and brown hip-hop,jacket-and-tights affair that didn't look too good either.

Origin: Ridiculed by the street kids for his attempts to uplift the community, Parker decides to create a super-hero persona to give the kids a different role model from the thugs and hustlers they idolize. Parker idolized Edison and decided to also focus on sound as the source of his powers, whipping up some devices using common electronic parts (like a stereo speaker and Walkman.)

Powers: he had a sonic blaster that could shake things apart, a collapsible mike that allowed him to eavesdrop on conversations from a distance, a set of sound effects he could amplify and a "cloaking device" that allowed him to muffle sounds so he could sneak up on people.

In his first appearance, he helps Batman and Superman capture a group of gangsters (but only after first getting into Batman's way.) He also shows up the resident bad-ass hood, impressing the kids who realize that a life of crime isn't so attractive after all.

In his second appearance, a few months later, he helps Superman bodyguard a thinly-disguised version of Michael Jackson after an unknown figure tries to kill him. This story is noteworthy for the surprisingly sympathetic depiction of the Michael Jackson-character and the embarassment that Batman suffers when he prematurely accuses someone.Those who are sick of the Batman-as-God character that appears in comics now should get WORLD'S FINEST #318 for that one scene.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 28, 2002 02:03 PM

Tenz - since I am an old contributor to you Guide, I think you know that you are allowed to use my biographies. But I can confirm it here.

Just give me credit where credit is due, and the freedom to update the entries when needed, and I'm more than happy to be a participator in the UNOFFICIAL DC GUIDE. Potentially the best DC site ever.

/ola



blok2984
Member
posted January 28, 2002 03:42 PM

There's a character called Destiny who appeared in NEW TEEN TITANS #9 (baxter series). He was chained to the book of souls. Any more info would be helpful.



Hellstone
Member
posted January 29, 2002 06:03 PM

To just say something briefly while waiting for someone who has more to say: Destiny was later used by Neil Gaiman in the SANDMAN mythos, as the biggest brother of the Endless. He has appeared quite frequently in the Vertigo-verse (but also appeared in recent DCU books such as CHRONOS). He even had his own miniseries: DESTINY - A CHRONICLE OF DEATHS FORETOLD.

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted January 29, 2002 08:03 PM

Destiny was also the host of WEIRD MYSTERY TALES and appeared in SUPERMAN [first series] #352. Consider him added to the list.



erdmann
Member
posted January 30, 2002 01:54 AM

Hi Tenzil. I just saw your post. Unfortunately, I didn't get to see the Superwoman bio on your site (only the dreaded 404). But any way, feel free to use my stuff. Just remember, erdmann has two "N"'s. But, seriously, I'm just happy to help.



Tenzel Kim
Member
posted January 30, 2002 08:26 AM

Originally posted by erdmann:


I just saw your post. Unfortunately, I didn't get to see the Superwoman bio on your site (only the dreaded 404). But any way, feel free to use my stuff. Just remember, erdmann has two Ns. But, seriously, I'm just happy to help.

Thanks, glad to be able to use your help The profile will be available again shortly. The servers are right now being upgraded so right now they aren't working properly. Try again tomorrow.

Btw, I did remember the two "n"'s. Don't worry.

Tenz.



Tenzel Kim
Member
posted January 30, 2002 11:24 AM

Just completed Captain Thunder and Starman 1957 for the Guide. I will put them online as soon as the server upgrade is finished and after that they can be found at:
http://www.comicboards.com/dcguide/Who/CaptainThunder_Bio.htm and
http://www.comicboards.com/dcguide/Who/Starman2SilverAge_Bio.htm

I've also pretty much completed Red Tornado I and the Cyclone Kids. Just need to find some good images for those. Any ideas?

Tenz.



outpost2
Member
posted January 30, 2002 12:16 PM

Originally posted by Tenzel Kim:


I've also pretty much completed Red Tornado I and the Cyclone Kids. Just need to find some good images for those. Any ideas?

Tenz,
I have images for Red Tornado, Cyclone Kids, Captain Thunder, and Starman 1957 on my web site. I'll e-mail you separately.



outpost2
Member
posted February 02, 2002 01:05 AM

HYPER-BOY / HYPER-MAN
Action Comics #265 (June 1960)
"The Superman From Outer Space!"
Reprinted in Superman [first series] #207 (June-July 1968)

He was born on a doomed world orbiting a red sun. His father rocketed him away just as his homeworld exploded. He was the planet’s only survivor. After landing on a smaller planet which orbited a yellow sun, this space-orphan gained amazing super-powers. He was found and adopted by a small-town couple, who passed him off as an ordinary boy. When he became a teenager, he acted as a meek and timid boy to cover his double life as a costumed crime-fighter. After his foster parents died and he graduated college, he took a job as a reporter in a large metropolitan city, continuing his alternate identity as a super-hero. Who is this remarkable crime-fighter? If you guessed "Superman", you guessed wrong. The answer is, of course, Hyper-Man!

When the planet Zoron exploded, that world’s sole survivor rocketed to the planet Oceania. Upon landing, he was found by the Kings, who adopted him as their own. As a teen, Chester King became the hero known as Hyper-Boy. As an adult, he became a roving television reporter for the Oceania Network, based in the city of Macropolis.

Hyper-Man learned about Superman and the Earth, and observed his counterpart for years using his telescopic vision. He was stunned at the similarities between Earth and Oceania. The Earth was almost an exact duplicate of his world, language and all. However, he was even more amazed by the fact that he and Superman were physically identical. The only differences were in their costumes. Whereas Superman’s costume was blue, red, and yellow, Hyper-Man’s was purple, green, and yellow. The day finally came when Hyper-Man’s secret identity was put in jeopardy. He knew that he would need Superman’s help in protecting it.

When he arrives on Earth, Hyper-Man poses as Superman to foil an attempt by Lois Lane to prove that Superman is Clark Kent. Later, after introducing himself, he asks Superman to travel to Oceania and return the favor. Superman agrees, but first takes Hyper-Man to his Fortress of Solitude, where he uses his super-computer, Super-Univac, to analyze the situation. The super-computer concludes that it is by sheer chance that, out of the trillions of worlds in the universe, two might be virtually identical.

Superman tells Hyper-Man that his super-computer can extrapolate Hyper-Man’s future if they feed enough information into it. Hyper-Man tells him of Yellow Zoronite, radioactive debris from his doomed homeworld, whose rays are dangerous to him. He also speaks of Lydia Long, TV reporter for the Oceania Network, who wants to marry him, and often suspects that he is really Chester King. When the computer completes it’s projections, Superman hides the results, but is now determined to expose Hyper-Man’s secret identity! They then fly off together towards Oceania.

Upon arriving on Oceania, Hyper-Man takes Superman to his Fortress of Secrecy, located under a plastic dome built on the sea-bottom. Hyper-Man shows his guest around his secret lair, including an exhibit containing two small meteors. The first is a replica of Yellow Zoronite. The second is a blue, glowing meteor, dubbed Meteor X, that he found in space the previous year. He intends on analyzing the radiation of the strange meteor someday at his leisure. Hyper-Man then explains to Superman that he will need to don one of his spare costumes in order to help protect his secret identity. He has tried to build robot duplicates, but has not yet perfected one. Superman tells Hyper-Man that he will attempt to complete the work on the robot, while the hero returns to his role as Chester King.

Soon afterward, as Chester King talks with Lydia Long, the Hyper-Man robot flies into the office through the window. However, as Superman had intended, the robot fails and cracks apart. Lydia is even more convinced than ever that Chester is really Hyper-Man.

Later, back at the Fortress, Hyper-Man assures Superman that he doesn’t blame him for the defective robot. He then asks Superman to don the spare Hyper-Man costume so that Superman can appear during the July 5th Independence Day celebration, while Hyper-Man appears as Chester King. As he appears to carry out Hyper-Man’s wishes, Superman notes that the O.S.A.’s flag contains only 48 stars. Just as Lydia begins to believe that Chester can’t possibly be Hyper-Man, the disguised Superman deflects a Yellow Zoronite meteor down to the surface. It lands near Chester, who collapses from the pain. Lydia and the rest of the crowd discover that Chester King is wearing a Hyper-Man costume under his clothes.

Superman returns to find Chester finally admitting to Lydia that he is indeed Hyper-Man. Hyper-Man, believing that the landing of the Zoronite meteor was just a fluke, tells Superman that he will still continue his super-career. However, when he attempts to fly he discovers that he cannot. He soon realizes that he has lost his other powers as well. The people of Oceania blame Superman for the loss of their world’s hero, and Superman leaves the planet in disgrace. As he leaves, Superman watches as Lydia proposes to Chester. A week later, Superman uses his telescopic vision to look in on the newlyweds.

A year passes. Supergirl arrives at the Fortress of Solitude, where she finds her cousin Superman staring into space. He tells her that Chester King’s final hour of doom has finally come. Chester is dying from blood-poisoning from some unknown malady... unknown, that is, to all but Superman. Superman explains that his computer had predicted that Hyper-Man would die within one year from exposure to Blue Zoronite, and that the first symptoms would be the loss of his powers. Superman had realized that the Blue Zoronite was Meteor X, the space rock on display in Hyper-Man’s Fortress. He deliberately exposed Hyper-Man’s secret identity so that Chester King would go down in history as a hero, and so that Chester might have one year of happiness with Lydia.



outpost2
Member
posted February 02, 2002 01:07 AM

MARVEL MAID and MARVEL MAN
Action Comics #272 (Jan 1961)
"The Second Supergirl!"
Action Comics #273 (Feb 1961)
"The Supergirl Of Two Worlds!"

While attending her General Science class, Linda Lee gets the idea that somewhere in the universe she might have a "double". As Supergirl, she meets with her cousin, Superman, at his Fortress of Solitude. She asks Superman to use his super-computer, the Super-Univac, to locate such a world. (Although it has only been a few months, both Superman and Supergirl have both apparently forgotten about the planet Oceania!) The super-computer processes all the data at its disposal, and finally locates the planet Terra, a world in orbit around Star-Sun-X45-266. This world duplicates most Earthly phenomena, including the presence of two individuals with super-powers. Supergirl explains that, if she can handle performing super-feats without screwing up, then it will prove to Superman that she is ready for her public debut on Earth. Superman agrees, and she heads into space.

Supergirl reaches Terra and finds a number of differences between Earth and its "twin". Florida is much bigger. The Statue of Liberty holds a banner instead of a torch. The Eiffel Tower is in America instead of France. Metropolis’ duplicate is called Macropolis on this world. To avoid notice, Supergirl changes back to Linda Lee, and continues to observe this world in her civilian identity. When a tigerrabbit escapes from the zoo, Linda expects to see a duplicate of Superman come to the rescue. Instead, it is Linda’s duplicate, Marvel Maid, who arrives and captures the wild animal. Her costume is identical to Supergirl’s, except for her "MM" chest emblem. It is clear to Linda that Marvel Maid’s existence is not a secret on this world.

When Marvel Maid heads to her Fortress of Marvels, Linda switches back to her Supergirl identity and follows. Supergirl is amazed to learn that the Fortress is in orbit around the planet, and that its giant key is hung on a nearby radioactive satellite. When Marvel Maid opens the Fortress door, Supergirl quickly flies in ahead of her. Marvel Maid is surprised when she finds a duplicate of herself waiting inside. Supergirl explains all about herself, then asks Marvel Maid about her origins.

Marvel Maid reveals that she was born in an underground city that once existed in a giant cavern at the center of the planet Terra. Like Krypton, her great civilization was also doomed. Jaal-Kor, her scientist father, had correctly predicted that the roof of their cavern would collapse and destroy the city. He worked day and night to build a small rocket-borer that would save his infant daughter. The child was sent to safety just as the cavern ceiling collapsed. Much later, after the rocket bored 4,000 miles upwards, she was found by a passing couple on the surface world. They adopted the poor orphan as their own. Later, her startled foster parents discovered that she possessed super-powers. Years later, she found out that cosmic rays, which never penetrated underground, had given her special powers when she reached the surface world. She became Terra’s super-heroine, Marvel Maid.

Supergirl asks if there is also a duplicate of Superman, but before Marvel Maid can answer, her space alarm rings. A forest fire threatens the people of a prehistoric world. Supergirl asks if she can take Marvel Maid’s place so that she can prove herself to Superman. Marvel Maid suggests that Supergirl start by replacing her in her secret identity as Lea Lindy, cub reporter. Shortly, at the Daily Planet offices in Macropolis, Linda meets her managing editor Perry Waite, an exact duplicate of Earth’s Perry White. Later, she alters her costume to include an "MM" emblem, then goes on patrol as Marvel Maid.

Supergirl receives a call for help from a disabled ship that is about to strike an iceberg. She arrives at the site of the emergency and attempts to melt the ice with the heat of her x-ray vision. Supergirl is shocked when the iceberg bursts into flames. As she pushes the ship to safety, she wonders who will protect other ships from the burning iceberg. Elsewhere, a man resembling Clark Kent, using his telescopic vision, watches the events from his prison cell. He concludes that Marvel Maid needs his help and, after verifying that the guards are not around, changes into his costumed identity (apparently the guards never noticed that he wore his costume under his prison uniform). The hero, Marvel Man, uses his secret escape tunnel to exit the prison and soon arrives on the scene.

Supergirl watches as Superman’s double pushes the burning iceberg underwater. He’s surprised that his "cousin" couldn’t tell that this was a false iceberg made of flammable salts that crystallized out of sea water. Supergirl explains that she is not really Marvel Maid, but rather a substitute from Earth. Supergirl again tells all about herself, then asks how Marvel Man escaped the destruction of his underground world.

Marvel Man explains that his father, who was Jaal-Kor’s brother, also knew of the coming disaster. He was a small boy when his father sent him away in a rock penetrator. Unfortunately, his earth-boring machine stalled before reaching the surface. Volcanic gases that seeped into the machine put him into suspended animation. Years later, when a big quake tossed his rock penetrator to the surface, he burst free just as Marvel Maid flew by on her regular patrol. She immediately recognized him as her cousin. Just like with Marvel Maid, the cosmic rays reaching the surface granted him super-powers. She made her cousin a costume similar to her own, and he took the name Marvel Man. They both soon realized that Marvel Man did not yet have the proper control over his powers, and decided that his existence should be kept secret until he was ready to be revealed. Supergirl is amazed at how similar his situation is to hers.

After returning to Macropolis, Supergirl tells Marvel Man that she secretly lives in an orphanage on Earth. He explains that he is a prisoner in the nearby jail under his other identity as "Ken Clark". Supergirl is shocked that a hero would have committed a crime. Marvel Man assures her that that is not the case. Everyone on Terra must have identification papers. Marvel Maid obtained hers from her foster parents. He had none, and was sentenced to prison for years! He pretends to be the weakest prisoner in order to hide his super-powers. To perform his secret missions, he comes and goes through his hidden underground tunnel. He explains that must avoid parole until Marvel Maid decides that his training is over. Marvel Man then leaves Supergirl and returns to his prison cell, becoming Ken Clark once more.

Later, a huge meteor knocks Marvel Maid’s Fortress of Marvels out of orbit. Supergirl summons Marvel Man, believing that saving the falling Fortress could convince Marvel Maid that his training period is over. Fearing that someone might see him flying in the air, Marvel Man decides he will wait on the ground and catch the descending Fortress. Supergirl checks a nearby farmhouse to make sure no one there is watching them. When she sees the farmer’s wife and her daughter outside, Supergirl grabs a lump of coal and squeezes it into a diamond. Supergirl correctly predicts that the woman will be distracted by the diamond, and returns to Marvel Man’s aid. She is stunned to find that Marvel Man has collapsed. As the Fortress crashes to the ground, Marvel Man explains that the reflections of the diamond have weakened him. The great pressure of their collapsing cavern formed diamonds out of simple carbon. The concussion hurled many super-hard diamonds from the center of Terra to the surface. When the deadly effects of the diamonds on Marvel Maid were discovered, all diamond jewelry was banned. When Supergirl looks in on the farmer’s wife, she discovers that the woman is calling the Diamond Demolition Squad! Supergirl and Marvel Man look in dismay at the wreckage that was once the Fortress of Marvels.

The two heroes decide that they must rebuild Marvel Maid’s fortress. They first repair the satellite, then get to work on piecing together all the former trophies. When they reconstruct the planetarium model of Terra’s solar system, Supergirl learns that their Mars has rings like Saturn, and their Jupiter has multiple red spots. Marvel Man then shows Supergirl a mystery weapon that they found in space. Supergirl recognizes it as a disintegrating ray built by Lex Luthor and flung into space by Superman years ago. Finally, when the interior is completed, the two heroes fly the Fortress of Marvels back into orbit. Marvel Man returns to his prison cell, while Supergirl greets the returning Marvel Maid.

Supergirl explains to Marvel Maid what has gone on in her absence. She tries to make Marvel Maid understand that Marvel Man no longer wants to be her secret weapon, anymore than she wants to be Superman’s. Marvel Maid decides that Supergirl should continue substituting for her so that she can prove to Superman that she is ready. Later, Supergirl saves the first manned rocket into space from crashing upon lift-off. Supergirl helps put the rocket into orbit, then discovers that this world’s first astronaut is a woman! Marvel Maid is so impressed with Supergirl that she offers to fly to Earth to tell Superman that she no longer needs any training. Supergirl remains behind and watches on Marvel Maid’s space monitor.

Marvel Maid arrives on Earth just in time to save a cable car from a lightning bolt. Superman appears soon afterward, congratulating her for her super-feat. He does not notice the "MM" emblem on Marvel Maid’s chest and mistakes her for Supergirl. He tells her that this last act has convinced him that she’s finally ready to go public. Superman takes the heroine to his Fortress of Solitude to show her all the things he has been preparing for Supergirl’s debut, not allowing Marvel Maid to get a word in edge-wise. Supergirl, who continues to watch on the space monitor, is surprised to learn just how proud Superman is of her. When Superman finally notices her emblem, Marvel Maid explains that she is Supergirl’s "double" from Terra. She says that she has come to Earth to tell Superman that his cousin has performed well on Terra. She suggests that they observe Supergirl on Superman’s space monitor. Even though Supergirl screws up her next mission, Marvel Maid blames it on her ignorance of the differences between their two worlds, and recommends that he still go ahead with his plans to reveal her to the public.

Marvel Maid returns to Terra and locates Supergirl and Marvel Man. She asks Supergirl to stay long enough to attend Marvel Man’s introduction to the people of Terra. Following the celebration, Supergirl returns home, fully expecting that Superman will give her similar good news. Instead, she learns that Superman has decided that her training must continue. He tells her that she could have avoided all her mistakes if she simply studied the differences between their two worlds ahead of time. He states that, whenever he visits a strange civilization, he always gets full information from one of their libraries first, so that nothing can take him by surprise. Although she is disappointed, she consoles herself with the fact that she now knows that Superman is rooting for her.



outpost2
Member
posted February 02, 2002 12:17 PM

Recently added:
A71+. Destiny (of the Endless)
A215++. the Rival

Recently completed:
A30. the Bat Squad
A115. the Homeless Avenger
A120. Hyper-Boy / Hyper-Man
A145. “Kolossal” Kate Krasher
A163. Marvel Maid and Marvel Man
A215++. the Rival
A241. Sonik
A247. Stanley and his Monster
A260. Superwoman (Kristen Wells)



Koppy McFad
New Member
posted February 04, 2002 01:38 AM

ARM-FALL-OFF-BOY

Nobody asked for him but I'm doing him anyway coz so many people out there consider him the epitome of lame superheroes.

Arm-Fall-Off-Boy (hereafter to be referred to as AFOB) only appeared once in SECRET ORIGINS #46, revealing the origins of the super-team's headquarters.

He was among the applicants to the Legion and showed up for just one page. AFOB tells Lightning Lad and company, "my power will astound you! Observe as I detach my limb (pops off arm)-- and transform it into a deadly weapon!"

"Die, villain! Ha-yaaa" (Whacks table forcefully.)

What makes this character so sad is that after that astounding demonstration, he immediately asks the Legion trio...
"So, when will I be inducted?"

He never appeared again.

As stupid as he may sound today, the Legion often had these wannabes who would try out for membership with the silliest powers, providing some comic relief. There was also Tusker, a guy who could project huge tusks out of his mouth, and of course, Porcupine Pete, who fires his quills in all directions at once, endangering both friend and foe.

Of course, one of these rejects ended up being accepted later. And Bouncing Boy remains one of the most beloved Legionnaires of all time.

Well I like him.

Gerard Jones wrote the story with AFOB so I assume he created him.



Koppy McFad
New Member
posted February 04, 2002 02:50 AM

THE SWORDFISH AND THE BARRACUDA

They appeared briefly in the 1984 run of WORLD'S FINEST in a very protracted story arc involving pirates, Cubans, and aliens. So pay close attention because things are going to get confusing.

Centuries ago, a group of alien explorers visit the Caribbean. One of them, an ambitious first mate called X'ult decides to stay behind and make himself king. His race has the power to "congeal time" into some ice or gel-like substance so he probably thinks it will be a walkover. As the spaceship blasts off, X'ult has an "environmental adaptor" ejected, for his own use. But it burns up in re-entry and turns into a molten rock with some strange markings on its side.

Meanwhile, an English beauty, Abigail Kent has fallen in with some pirates and in order to survive, she becomes one of them. The pirates later capture an unnamed European swordsman who they hold for ransom. But Abigail decides to rescue him and they flee in a boat to a small island.

There, they find the natives worshipping the old rock with the strange markings. The natives force Abigail and the swordsman to put their palms on the mark, branding it on their hands. When the two touch their "tattoos", they are amazingly transformed. Abigail becomes the Barracuda, with whale-like strength and aquatic powers while the guy becomes Swordfish, with the power of flight and mean-looking cutlass.

They fight the pirates of the region but soon are forced to confront X'ult-- now calling himself, the Master Pirate. In one encounter, X'ult tries to stop the two from touching their tattoos (and activating their powers) by freezing time. Only he gets caught in the congealed time as well. The frozen trio sink to the bottom of the sea and are lost for ages.

Until Batman and Superman come along. Bats and Supes are on the trail of two gentlemen bandits called Null and Void who got their powers in a similar manner to Swordfish and Barracuda. (Null could nullify a person's senses, Void could teleport objects)

The frozen trio of X'ult, Abigail and the Swordsman have been recovered from the deep and the Worlds Finest team, as well as Null and Void, are interested. As the frozen figures are discovered near Cuba, the Russians and their Cuban friends are also in the game. In the course of the story, X'ult, Swordfish and the Barracuda are all revived. Null and Void have a falling out and X'ult, (who has become entranced with Abigail) takes Void and a hypnotized Barracuda along with him on a giant ship of congealed time in order to conquer the world.

Superman, Batman, Null and Swordfish give chase and battle the baddies (and the hypnotized Barracuda.) Superman uses his superspeed to unravel the "congealed time", causing X'ult, Swordfish and Barracuda to return to their own era. Just before they fade away, Barracuda comes to her senses and recognizes Swordfish, her beloved.

We never find out if Swordish and Barracuda were able to defeat the Master Pirate in their own time. Maybe their likely creator, David Anthony Kraft, had plans for them but it is they are now all probably retconned out of existance.



outpost2
Member
posted February 04, 2002 09:20 PM

Arm-Fall-Off-Boy? Now that's obscure!

Two comments: (1) The post-reboot AFOB was reintroduced as Splitter in LEGIONNAIRES #43. (2) I know KC Carlson created Fortress Lad. He may have also created AFOB.

Now that Null and Void have been mentioned, seems like they are likely candidates for the list. Care to take them on Koppy?



Koppy McFad
Member
posted February 05, 2002 10:43 PM

NIGHTWOLF
There may have been other characters with the same name but the one I remember is the guy who appeared in the farwell issue of WORLD'S FINEST COMICS.

That was his sole appearance although you can credit him for (indirectly) breaking up the Superman-Batman team.

POWERS: he could create a supernatural darkness and summon ghostly wolves to do his bidding.

ORIGIN: An unidentified archeologist himbo, he stole a magic belt from his female co-worker and learned spells from an Indian shaman on how to use the belt, which he used to try to bring America's agricultural community to its knees.

Superman was investigating and was beaten by the magic wolves. Batman discovers Nightwolf's origin and uses trickery to get the belt away from him, rescuing Superman and ending the menace.

Then, Batman gives a very patronizing speech to Supes about how he flies in without thinking and warns Superman that he won't be around all the time to rescue him.

The two go their separate ways and the caption tells us that a friendship that lasted half a century and a world war may have ended.

The writer meant that literally because WORLD'S FINEST was cancelled and under the post-Crisis regime, Batman and Superman were not friends.

Nightwolf has probably been retconned out of existance, like all those wonderful WORLD'S FINEST stories.

Joey Cavalieri had the sad duty of writing that farewell issue so I assume he created Nightwolf.



erdmann
Member
posted February 08, 2002 02:17 AM

All the forgotten characters from WORLD'S FINEST reminded me of a really obscure baddie from one the earliest issues I can remember reading of the book. And so, without further ado, in an effort to bump up this thread and at the request of absolutely no one, I present to you... Capricorn.

First (and last) appearance: “Who is Capricorn?!” by Bob Haney, Dick Dillin and Dave Cockrum, WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #218 (July-Aug. ‘73)
Real name: Dr. Bogardus (first name unrevealed)
Base of operations: Gotham City
Powers: Dying from an unnamed illness, Bogardus’ attempts to cure himself gave him the ability to read minds
Current whereabouts: Deceased (and most likely out of continuity)

During a visit to Commissioner Gordon (or Commish, as Batman calls him), The Caped Crusader spots a mysterious note in the trash. Bearing a black goat’s head symbol, it says, “Forget me not. Capricorn.” At Batman’s urging, Gordon explains someone has learned his darkest secret. Once, feeling pity for a young offender, Gordon concealed evidence that would have kept the man in prison longer. Later, feeling guilty, he turned in the evidence, claiming to have just found it. He told no one, but Capricorn knows all about it. Oddly, Capricorn has made no blackmail demands.

Batman later prevents the mayor of Gotham from jumping off the docks. Capricorn has learned his greatest secret, too. Batman is certain Capricorn is no mind reader, but when he gets home, he finds that Bruce Wayne has also been contacted and that Capricorn knows his secret as well.

After learning that several of Gotham’s most prominent men are Capricorn’s victims, Batman brings Superman in to help.

Certain the culprit is someone with a criminal record who has used “mentalism” as an M.O. before, they decide to pay a visit to retired gangster Rick de Fabio. Batman attempts to break into Fabio’s home, only to be saved from an exploding booby trap by Superman. Fabio arrives with a gun, claiming he is only protecting his home from intruders. Certain that Fabio is Capricorn, Batman roughs him up and turns him over to the police.

Fabio is soon free and complains to TV reporters that the heroes wrongly accused him of being someone named “Capricorn.” The real Capricorn, Bogardus, sees the report, then goes to Fabio’s house and guns him down. He leaves behind a taunting note for the heroes: “There is only one Capricorn, and I am he.”

Capricorn slips up in his next letter to Bruce Wayne when he makes it all too clear he had been in a health club the same time as the millionaire playboy. Wayne remembers a middle-aged man who looked like a professor and who ordered goat’s milk. As Batman, he and Superman check with the club’s owner and soon have Bogardus’ name and address. At his home, the find proof he is Capricorn, but the doctor escapes through forgotten lead water mains running beneath Gotham. Dating back to colonial days, they were abandoned long ago when the detrimental effects of lead were discovered.

Unable to find Bogardus, Batman and Superman tell the press that Capricorn apparently died attempting to flee them. They hope Bogardus’ ego will force him out into the open.

Capricorn’s victims host a party in honor of Superman and Batman to thank them for ending his threat. But while they are toasting, the party is crashed - literally - by a black goat jumping through a skylight. The heroes race to the roof, but find only an animal trainer who was paid by a “skid-row bum” to drop the goat through the skylight.

While the rest of the people present decide that this is a parting gift from the late Capricorn, Superman and Batman secretly listen to a cassette tape on the goat’s collar. “This is Capricorn speaking!” a voice on the tape says. “I’m alive and well and living in Gotham! Batman, really Bruce Wayne, and Superman are liars and failures!”

“God!” Batman exclaims. “He’s out there - laughing at us! And someday he’ll expose our failure to the entire world!”

But what the World’s Finest team will never know is that Bogardus has died in the lead water mains. The last panel shows his skeletal remains and a caption says: “Yes, to this day the world believes our heroes triumphed once again while they dread Capricorn’s return. Only you know the real story!”

Note: Capricorn was possibly inspired by Zodiac, a real-life serial killer who sent taunting messages to authorities, the media and even relatives of his victims. He is suspected of killing dozens of people between 1966 and 1981. His true identity remains a mystery.



Koppy McFad
Member
posted February 10, 2002 10:29 PM

Capricorn: cool story. The connection to the Zodiac killer makes it even creepier. People don't think much of Haney now but some of his stories are mini-classics that don't go on and on for six issues.


Now for:

NULL AND VOID

Real names: Null was Solomon, pudgy, failed businessman and Void was Peter, an English-David Niven lookalike who was a professional rogue.

Powers: Null could neutralize people's senses. Even Superman's. Void could teleport an object from one hand to another.

Origin: Centuries ago, in the age of piracy, ambitious spacefarer X'ult tries to set himself up as ruler of Earth. He has an 'environmental adaptor' ejected from his ship but it melts in re-entry to Earth's atmosphere and ends up as a molten rock with a strange marking on its side in an island in the Caribbean.

In World War II, Solomon, on a boating trip, gets shipwrecked on the Vichy-occupied island of Martinique. David Niven-- I mean Peter, some sort of hustler, uses his influence to help the two of them escape the island. They end up getting stuck on the island with the rock where the natives make them undergo some strange ritual where their palms are branded with the mark from the strange rock. They discover that when they press their marks together, they become Null and Void. But their powers wear off eventually so they have to stay close to each other to retain their powers.

Eventually a passing ship, piloted by Ernest Hemingway(!) rescues them. That is when Sol discovers that Peter had been hired by his dad to rescue him all along. Despite this, they remain friends and everytime Sol needs some working capital (which is often since he is a lousy businessman), the two go out and commit crimes together. They operate for 20 years without anyone even being aware of their existance.

That is, until a 1983 issue of WORLD'S FINEST when they run into Batman and Superman. Supes and Bats manage to detect the two and duke it out with them. We see that Peter and Sol aren't all bad as they risk capture to save Batman when a building collapses around them.

Bats and Supes manage to capture Peter after his powers wear off. Then, over a year later, we see the trial of Peter where he actually puts Batman and Superman on the witness stand and gets acquitted by basically saying that Batman and Superman can't testify against him because no one knows their real identities. Makes you wonder how the World's Finest duo ever got anyone convicted in the past.

Meanwhile, a block of frozen time, containing X'ult and two other rock-branded heroes (Swordfish and Barracuda), is recovered in the waters of the Caribbean. Null and Void go to investigate and Superman and Batman follow. In the course of the story, Null and Void have a falling out. Void signs on with X'ult while Null helps Batman, Superman and Swordfish battle the two and rescue Barracuda. Superman unravels X'ult's frozen time and sends X'ult, Swordfish and Barracuda back to their proper era. Sol decides to give himself (and Peter) over to the police, ending their criminal careers.

In the last years of WORLD'S FINEST, Joey Cavalieri and David Kraft tried to do some original things, creating a rogues gallery and supporting cast exclusive to that title. Unfortunately, many of their creations have vanished after the Crisis. Sol and Peter have probably been retconned away as well. Guess you could say that Null and Void are now null and void.



Hellstone
Member
posted February 14, 2002 07:18 PM

Could someone tell me a summary of the comic SILVERBLADE by Cary Bates and Gene Colan?

/ola



erdmann
Member
posted February 15, 2002 06:38 PM

Starman III (Part I)
Real name: Mikaal Tomas
Other aliases: Michael Thomas
First appearance: “Starman,” by Gerry Conway, Mike Vosburg and Mike Royer, in 1ST ISSUE SPECIAL #12 (March ‘76).
Base of operations: New York City, later Opal City.
Planet of origin: Talok III (originally unnamed but described as being 3,000 light-years away from Earth and in orbit around a red dwarf star).
Powers: Highly skilled unarmed combatant, flight through the use of “flight pods.” Mikaal also possessed a “sonic crystal” which originally alerted him to approaching danger and generated sonic bursts that could be directed against an opponent. It was later said to harness cosmic energy and may have become the source of his flight powers. Because of something unique in Mikaal’s physiology, the crystal would work for him, but few other Talokians.

Mikaal Tomas was a member of a blue-skinned race bent on conquering Meridian (Earth), not because its own world was dying, but because the species “required conquest emotionally.” His race lived on Talok III, but was originally the lost 13th Tribe from Talok VIII, future home of Shadow Lass (a.k.a. Umbra) of the Legion of Super- Heroes. Mikaal, one of the Talokian Warrior Elite, and his lover, Lyysa Jurndaal, were among a group sent to establish a hidden base on the moon. It was to be the staging point for the invasion.

Lyysa did not share her race’s addiction to conquest, however, and sought to warn Earth. Mikaal failed to talk her out of her plan and she was killed attempting to steal a shuttle craft. Distraught, Mikaal attacked the guard who shot her, only to be knocked out and hauled before the base’s leaders, Lady Cormell, Master Komak and an unnamed third alien. He was found guilty of treason and sentenced to death.

But Mikaal escaped and traveled to Earth, where his stolen shuttle crashed in the North Bronx. Flying from the doomed ship at the last minute, Mikaal was spotted by a gang of thugs who attempted to rob him. Despite being stabbed, Mikaal defeated the toughs and walked off.

Soon, police, led by Inspector Dave Clarson and Sgt. Jack O’Donnell, arrived to investigate the crash. They had barely begun when Col. Magruder of the USAF arrived and announced his men would take over. A dispute over jurisdiction was cut short when the shuttle exploded, killing Clarson. Magruder would later try to recruit O’Donnell in his efforts to hunt down the shuttle’s pilot.

Meanwhile, Mikaal, broke into a grocery store and was confronted by its owner, Franklin Clay. Suspecting Mikaal to be a burglar, Clay threatened him with a rifle, but the alien used his “sound stuff” to make the weapon vanish. Then he collapsed. Clay decided “the boy needs a bed more’n jail,” then thought, “and if I can make myself some money off that sound gadget he’s got, well, nobody says a Good Samaritan’s gotta take a loss.”

Mikaal awakened in Clay’s apartment and told his story to the man and his wife, Ruth. They obviously didn’t believe him, so when Ruth excused herself, Mikaal was certain she had gone to call the police. Declaring that he must be free to fight against his people, he flew out a window.

On the moon, Komak had enlisted the aid of a “mind-slaver” - First Guardsman of the Worldstone Turran Kha - to hunt down and kill Mikaal. Kha attacked Mikaal on Earth and as the two aliens faced off in front of startled humans, Mikaal thought, “A guardsman -- here on Earth. Then the Mind Council is serious, and the threat to Earth -- is deadly! I only pray I have the strength to do... what must be done!”

And then the story ended with a standard “write in and let us know if you want to see more of Starman” blurb. Unfortunately for anyone who did want more, it would be nearly 20 years before Mikaal Tomas’ story would be continued.


TO BE CONTINUED (in a whole lot less than 20 years, I promise).

In the meantime, check out Mikishawm’s “Deadliest Man Alive” thread on the “Power Company” board. Kobra hardly qualified as obscure, but you’re unlikely to find a more exhaustively detailed character profile anywhere.



erdmann
Member
posted February 16, 2002 01:48 AM

Starman III (Part II)
When comics fans first read of Mikaal Tomas in 1976, they had no idea he would not be seen again for almost two decades. He did not merit a WHO'S WHO entry and if he appeared in CRISIS, it must have been in one of Perez’s amazing crowd shots.

Most people forgot about Mikaal, and those who didn’t debated whether he was ever part of the DC Universe in the first place. That question was answered in an epilogue to STARMAN vol. 2 #3 (Jan. ‘95). Readers of the James Robinson-penned series were shown an emaciated, ragged Mikaal, now billed as “The Cosmic Freak” at a circus owned by a man named Bliss.

Four issues later, Jack Knight, the newest Starman, visited the circus during a trip through Turk County in search of collectibles. He found the chained alien, who could no longer speak English. Mikaal managed to touch him, filling Jack’s mind with disjointed images from his past. Disturbed, Jack spoke to Bliss and was told the Freak was only Greg Bailey, a performer from Albany. Jack was not convinced, so Bliss ordered his hulking servant Crusher and the other freak show performers to attack the fledgling hero.

In the following issue, Jack learned Bliss was an incubus, a demonic creature that fed upon the emotions of humans. Watching Jack’s battle with the monster, Mikaal felt hope stir within him and was at last able to use his crystal - now mysteriously fused to his chest - to join the fray. Bliss was destroyed, Crusher fled and Mikaal and the other freaks were free.

In issue 10, Ted Knight, began working to restore Mikaal’s memories. As his memories trickled back, Mikaal became Jack’s ally and a friend to a “tame” incarnation of the swamp creature Solomon Grundy. He would even find happiness with a new love, an African-American man named Tony.

He would later accompany Jack into space, traveling to Rann and “Throneworld,” where they learned the surprising connection between Starman IV (Prince Gavyn) and Starman V (Will Payton). Detours into the timesteam would allow them to visit a young Jor-El on Krypton and the 30th Century, where Mikaal learned his race’s true past and his possible future.

But what had happened to Mikaal after his first appearance? The details would be scattered throughout the series.

In 1976, the blue Starman traveled America, fighting his people and more terrestrial threats. He believed he had killed Turran Kha, but that later proved to be incorrect. Other members of his race, such as the Rahndolph Twins and the Mighty Zag, did die at his hands.

He wound up in Ted Knight’s hometown of Opal City because “that’s the place for a Starman.” Along the way, he ran afoul of the original Green Lantern Alan Scott after a gang of robbers painted themselves blue to pass as members of his race. After making peace, they caught the real criminals. Mikaal was impressed by Scott’s heroism.

He also teamed up with the Martian Manhunter. This may have occurred after a similar “misunderstanding,” judging from art in issue #63. Mikaal also fought the sorcerer Felix Faust, possibly with J’Onn’s help. This would have predated Faust’s first appearance in “Justice League of America” by several years. Mikaal also defeated a super-villain called The Goner and battled another named No Mercy.

Then his people disappeared and he found himself at loose ends. Because of his race’s tendency toward addictive behavior, Mikaal turned to hedonistic pursuits, including drug use. For a while, he lived with a couple of hustlers named Bruce and Tiffany (STARMAN 80-PAGE GIANT #1, Jan. ‘99). That ended when Tiffany brought No Mercy home, offering him sex in exchange for drugs. Although stoned, Mikaal recognized his old enemy. During their battle, No Mercy stabbed Bruce to death with a ceremonial dagger hidden inside an African statue (Tiffany had stolen it from future police officer Matt O’Dare) and Mikaal blasted his foe out a window.

Master Komak finally caught up with Mikaal in an Opal disco (issue #28, March ‘97). By this time, Mikaal was so far gone from drug use he did not recognize Komak or even remember much of his own past.

“For six months you fought us,” Komak said. “But by the seventh month, you would have died. If our race had had a seventh month.”

He explained an invasion of Daxam by their race had gone badly. Fearing retaliation by the potentially super-powered Daxamites, the blue-skinned race created a genocide device to use against Daxam. First, however, Darkstar Chaser Bron attacked the “Worldstone,” outraged the Talokians had destroyed one of his favorite planets. During the melee, the genocide device went off, destroying the planet and its 39 million inhabitants.

When word of this reached the moonbase, many committed suicide. Others went out into space to meet their fates. Komak planned to do this, but first traveled to Earth, where he succumbed to sexual addiction and contracted herpes. Incurable but not fatal among humans, the disease was proving lethal to Komak.

A warrior to the end, Komak asked Mikaal for a fight to the death. Using a device and drugs, the two aliens left their bodies in their astral forms. Komak died and Mikaal returned to his body to find his sonic crystal fused to his chest and apparently useless. Leaving the disco to seek a drug connection, Mikaal was attacked by unknown men and spirited away.

The rest of the story would be revealed in issue 64. Mikaal was essentially sold into slavery, passing from one person to another for 12 years. For a while, he was part of a Japanese businessman’s collection of super-hero memorabilia. Then he was traded to a European countess for the Red Torpedo’s ship. The countess used the alien for her pleasure until Bliss killed her and took him to feed off his emotions. Mikaal was Bliss’ prisoner for seven years.

During the “Stars My Destination” storyline, Mikaal learned Turran Kha was still alive. When war broke out between Rann and Throneworld, the two warriors fought again. This time, Mikaal made certain Kha would not return. This marked a change in the “gentle” warrior. By the time Mikaal and Jack returned to Earth, he had become more violent, more like others of his species. In one issue, he blew up a carload of fleeing felons. In his defense, he pointed out they had killed at least one person. Shortly after this, he was captured by the evil Culp.

During the “Grand Guigol” storyline, it was revealed that No Mercy, whose real name was Louie Soul, had died at Mikaal’s hands. His son, Frankie, had worked for the Mist II and was among the criminals recruited by Culp to destroy Opal. He wanted to kill Mikaal, but found himself standing in line behind Solomon Grundy. The kindly Grundy had sacrificed himself during the “Infernal Devices” storyline and a new, more traditionally vicious Grundy had arisen in his place. Grundy claimed his good persona was gone forever, yet when Soul fired a bazooka at Mikaal, Grundy stepped in the way. The swamp monster died (temporarily, again) claiming he didn’t know why he saved his foe. Mikaal apparently then killed the younger Soul.

Mikaal also appeared, briefly, in the pages of JUSTICE LEAGUE OF ALIENS , a one-shot part of a fifth-week special event. But characterization was off, with “Mikaal” acting bored and disinterested in doing anything to protect Earth. Frankly, I suspect he was really a Durlan in disguise.

When last seen, Mikaal was among the heroes left by Jack Knight to defend The Opal. In the aftermath of “Grand Guigol” and his father’s death, Jack retired from “the Life” to be with his children and the woman he loved. Before leaving Opal City behind, he visited with Mikaal and told him he considered him a brother.

He also spoke to Tony, who worried about Mikaal’s new, more dangerous attitude. Jack told Mikaal, who was already aware of Tony’s fears. Hopeful, Jack said the couple would work it out.

“Or we won’t,” Mikaal said bluntly.

Mikaal’s current activities are unknown, but it can be assumed that he still operates in Opal City, although not under the name Starman. In one possible future - one that leads to the current incarnation of the Legion - his “years of wandering” end in 2021 when he travels to Talok VIII. He becomes the planet’s champion and dies valiantly, leaving behind a legend that will still inspire the planet’s inhabitants a millennium later.



outpost2
Member
posted February 17, 2002 10:21 PM

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN OF TIME
Firestorm, The Nuclear Man #70 (Apr 88) - #71 (May 88)

Professor Emily Rice, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, holds a press conference at Vandermeer University, discussing the school’s selection for experiments with the proposed Strategic Defense Initiative. Suddenly, an angry, bespectacled man appears, grabs and crushes the SDI model in his hand, then just as suddenly disappears. Although Prof. Rice recognized the man, she feigns ignorance when questioned by the authorities.

A few hours earlier, the new Firestorm battles the beast called the Zuggernaut. The creature fells the Nuclear Man and escapes. When Firestorm splits into Ronnie Raymond and Mikhail Arkadin, the mind of the new Firestorm is drawn into the timestream, where it encounters Rikkard Rynders, the Flying Dutchman of Time.

The Flying Dutchman realizes that Firestorm is meeting him for the first time. The Dutchman explains that in his own past he has had other meetings with Firestorm, but they still lie in the Nuclear Man’s future. They have been enemies and also sometimes friends, for the Dutchman has changed many times during his captivity. He is adrift in the timestream, passing from one end of time to the other with no hope of escape. It is because of this that he calls himself the Flying Dutchman of Time, as in the legend.

By focusing their mental energy, the Dutchman brings Firestorm back to the late 60’s. They observe Professor Rynders holding a peace rally with his students. Later, they see Rynders in his lab with Emily Rice, his graduate assistant and lover. Rynders had come to the conclusion that time-travel was a matter not of physics but of the consciousness. Utilizing psychedelic drugs, Rynders’ astral self had already made several trips through time. It irritated him that none of his colleagues believed his successes without demonstrable, verifiable proof. Thus, he devised machines which could record his neural impulses so that what he experienced, others could see. Emily questions the safety of the experiment, but Rynders is arrogant and patronizing, and insists on proceeding. The Dutchman tells Firestorm that he has watched these events unfold thousands of times. He has tried to stop himself, to no avail.

Rynders wants nothing less than to travel back to the beginning of time. All the wonders he passes on the way mean nothing to him. He is determined to reach the primal big bang that began the universe and see if anything, perhaps, lay beyond it. As Rynders approaches the dawn of time, he sees a large hand in the midst of unimaginable swirling energies. Emily too watches the events from her view-screen. Without warning, the time machine shorts out. Rynders’ physical body begins to convulse, and the machine explodes, bursting into flames. Believing that Rynders is dead, Emily flees the room.

The Dutchman tells Firestorm that his body’s destruction is what has cast him adrift in the timestream, but that Firestorm might be able to help him. The Dutchman explains that he himself cannot change his own past, that he is blocked from entering his own body, but that Firestorm is not. He can enter the body and use his powers to set it free. Firestorm says he is incomplete, that he derives his powers from others not in this time frame. The Dutchman insists and shoves Firestorm’s mental form into his past self. Firestorm becomes trapped in the burning body. The Dutchman tells the Nuclear Man that he will either save him from his doom, or share in it!

Firestorm is in agony as he burns in the body of Rikkard Rynders. With great effort, he succeeds in abandoning the physical form. The Dutchman tells Firestorm that his failure has doomed him to wander the timestream forever. Firestorm demands that the Dutchman return him to his own time. The bitter wanderer claims that he did not bring Firestorm into this realm, and does not know the path back. It was a temporal worm-hole -- a time eddy -- that had drawn Firestorm’s roaming mind into the timestream. The Dutchman states that they will be enemies once again, as they were before. He tells Firestorm that he will be content with the fact that, in one of their meetings that Firestorm has not yet experienced, the Dutchman has had his revenge for the Nuclear Man’s failure. The Dutchman fades away, leaving Firestorm to wander the timestream on his own.

Firestorm spends years traveling forward through time, watching the events of his own birth, as well as the events of the world at large. Eventually, he reaches the present, just as the villain Stalnoivolk is attacking Ronnie Raymond. Firestorm concentrates as Ronnie attempts to summon his fiery alter ego. Firestorm re-emerges in his physical form, ready for battle.



outpost2
Member
posted February 17, 2002 10:23 PM

OK, folks, I think it’s almost time for Round V. The archive file for Round IV is approaching 400K, which is about as big as I like the individual archives to get. Anyone who wants to add new requests, please make them over the next week. I’ve already generated a new alphabetical list, so once I get all the additions added, I’ll start the new thread. Thanks.

Here are my own additions for Round V:
Air Wave II / Maser [Green Lantern v2 #100, Firestorm the Nuclear Man #88]
Naiad (Mai Miyazaki) [Firestorm the Nuclear Man #90-93]


Recently added:
A3+. Air Wave II / Maser
A14+. Arm-Fall-Off-Boy
A44+. Capricorn
A179+. Naiad
A186+. Null and Void
A230+. Silverblade

Recently completed:
A14+. Arm-Fall-Off-Boy
A44+. Capricorn
A95. the Flying Dutchman of Time
A183. Nightwolf
A186+. Null and Void
A251+. Starman (Mikaal Tomas)
A264. Swordfish and Barracuda



Hellstone
Member
posted February 17, 2002 10:45 PM

Okay, I've recently purchased a few old Silver Age books on eBay. And I'd like to handle:
*Flora, the Girl In The Golden Flower (STRANGE ADVENTURES #18) (the reprint of which will arrive to my mailbox soon)
and
*The Sponge Man (CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN #47 & 51)

(And I will still do Terrific Whatzit, Blue Jay, and the rest, even though my pace is slow...)

Thank you for the Flying Dutchman bit. I've been curious about that one.

/ola



outpost2
Member
posted February 18, 2002 10:37 PM

Here are a few more additions:

Aquarius
the Hero Group
the Intergalactic Patrol
the Mamelukes
the Moondancers
the People’s Heroes
the Recombatants
the Seven Shadows
Soyuz

Also, there are an Arabic and an Israeli team that I wanted to add. The Arabic team, which I believe was called "the Jihad", had Ravan as a member (he later joined the Suicide Squad). Don't remember the Israeli team's name. Something like "Halyoth" maybe? I'm probably WAY off on that one. Don't remember where they appeared, otherwise I'd look it up. Sound familiar?



Hellstone
Member
posted February 19, 2002 07:10 AM

The Jihad was not pure Arabic, but an international terrorist team who often took assignments from the Muslim powers.

The Israeli group was calld "Hayoth".

/ola



datalore
Member
posted February 19, 2002 08:17 AM

Badb of the Jihad was an Irish terrorist (if memory serves)...but they were mostly Quraci...

I had put a quick history of the Hayoth on the 'Suicide Squad' board (I'll have to see if I can find it)...

AND Soyuz and the People's Heroes...sigh...



datalore
Member
posted February 19, 2002 10:39 AM

Can't seem to find my Hayoth data...

...but, from elsewhere, something Hellstone asked on (and, no...I'm utterly terrified of the "T"'s!)

VENOM
First (and only) Appearance: Fury Of Firestorm Annual #4

Real name: Todd Walton

A Los Angeles based medical student and user of Venom-X, a hallucenogenic drug with side effects, who transformed into a snake-like man. Todd infected Felicity Smoak with Venom-X and went on a killing spree in Los Angeles, killing Mr. Shark, the drug lord responsible for getting him hooked on the drug. Stopped by Firestorm (whom he also sprayed with the drug through his wrist-shooter...but did he die facing Firestorm, or was his death an hallucination?). No known links to Eddie Slick, who had introduced a mutigenic drug to wrestler King Crusher, or to Kobra, who had been based in Califonia and later had agents who were transformed into snake-men, but one never knows...



Surgeon General
Member
posted February 19, 2002 10:40 AM

The Seven Shadows? LOL

That'll be a short one. They only appeared once, and were already dead at the time!



Hellstone
Member
posted February 21, 2002 03:51 PM

Ah. Almost forgot. I'd like to add ONE more for the next round:
Jack Kirby's "Goody Rickles", from his JIMMY OLSEN tenure.

And may I also remind that I'd love to see a continuation of The Vigilante's "Slam Bradley" post - one that covers the modern appearances in the SUPERMAN titles, DETECTIVE COMICS, and CATWOMAN.

/ola





To be continued in Obscure DC Characters, Round V.




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