< BACK

Author Topic: Mikishawm: I think I know who you are!
Mikishawm
Member
posted March 30, 2002 08:42 PM

Gregorian Falstaff was a reclusive billionaire who moved to Gotham in 1978 and immediately set off alarm bells with Lucius Fox, who believed that Falstaff's couldn't mean anything good for the Wayne Foundation (BATMAN # 307). Falstaff eventually contacted Fox through his secretary (# 315) and Lucius finally met the mystery man face-to-face in BATMAN # 317 and 318. Falstaff wore a bright, archaic suit, had long red hair and mustache and was significantly overweight. As he polished off his latest meal, Falstaff tried to hire Lucius away from the Wayne Foundation and Fox refused. The billionaire seemed to take the rejection in stride but noted afterwards that "there are many different ways to accomplish my ultimate ends -- and not all of them pleasant."

Falstaff appeared only once more during Len Wein's run on the series. In BATMAN # 322, Captain Boomerang confronted him over his part in a failed stock investment and Batman stepped in to rescue the billionaire -- meeting his business rival for the first time.

Taking the torch from his pal Len, Marv Wolfman put the Gregorian Falstaff subplot into high gear in 1980's BATMAN # 330-332. Holding the daughter of Bruce Wayne's secretary hostage, Falstaff forced Bruce Wayne's secretary to give him confidential documents by holding her daughter hostage, ran a smear campaign against Bruce in his newspaper and even attempted to destroy the Wayne Foundation building.

Using those confidential papers, Falstaff now had leverage to steal Bruce Wayne's empire. The billionaire hadn't expected to face Batman, though, but he made a valiant attempt to kill the Dark Knight with a gun that fired a sphere of lethal energy. The villain was unexpectedly kicked into the deadly sphere -- by Talia, no less -- and burned to cinders in a matter of seconds. Only later would Batman learn that Falstaff had been working on behalf of Ra's al Ghul and that his weapons and mutated bodyguards were supplied by the Demon's Head.


And now, here's a few Batman-related parallel worlds, starting and ending with ones that were named by DC --

EARTH-12:

A somewhat demented variant of Earth-1, whose residents include most of Earth-1's heroes as well as the Inferior Five. Its first definite appearance was in SHOWCASE # 62 (May-June, 1966) and it was named in THE OZ-WONDERLAND WARS # 3 (March, 1986).

Appearances:
THE ADVENTURES OF BOB HOPE # 94
THE ADVENTURES OF JERRY LEWIS # 92, 97, 105, 112, 117
All-NEW COLLECTORS' EDITION # C-53, C-60
CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE # 1 (GREEN TEAM # 2-3), 2 (PREZ # 5)
FIRST ISSUE SPECIAL # 2
THE INFERIOR FIVE # 1-10
LIMITED COLLECTORS' EDITION # C-33, C-42
THE OZ-WONDERLAND WARS # 3 (mention)
PLASTIC MAN [second series] # 1-10
RUDOLPH, THE RED-NOSED REINDEER [first series] # 1-12; [second series] C-20, C-24, C-50
SHOWCASE # 62-63, 65
SUPERGIRL [first series] # 10/1
SUPERMAN MEETS THE QUIK BUNNY
SWING WITH SCOOTER # 5

"EARTH-27*" (named after ANIMAL MAN # 27):

Home of variant versions of Animal Man, Batman, and B'wana Beast and historical divergences such as Hitler's hanging for his war crimes and Edward Kennedy's drowning at Chappaquiddick (ANIMAL MAN # 27-32).

"EARTH-32" (named after GREEN LANTERN # 32):

An Earth similar to Earth-1 but with numerous variances. Among the deviations, Hal Jordan married Carol Ferris early in his Green Lantern career and characters such as Luthor, Robin, Speedy, and the Flash II had origins that differed from their Earth-1 and Earth-2 counterparts. First revealed as a distinct world in GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 32 (Oct 1964).

Appearances:
ACTION COMICS # 279/1
ADVENTURE COMICS # 209/3
THE AMAZING WORLD OF DC COMICS # 11
THE AQUATEERS MEET THE SUPER FRIENDS
BATMAN # 32/2
BATMAN (Power Records) # 27, 30
BATMAN: BELT 'EM FOR SAFETY
BATMAN: THE JOKER'S LAST LAUGH
BATMAN: THE LAST ANGEL
BATMAN: THE PERIL OF THE PENGUIN
BLACKHAWK [first series] # 203, 242-250
THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD [first series] # 90, 99, 131
CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE # 1 (FIRESTORM # 6), 2 (THE VIXEN # 1)
DC CHALLENGE # 1-12
DC SUPER-STARS # 14/1
THE FLASH [first series] 167/1
THE FLASH VS. DR. POLARIS
THE GOLDEN AGE # 1-4
GREEN LANTERN # 32/1
HAWKMAN [first series] # 22-27
JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA VS. AMAZO
SUPERBOY # 59/2, 158
SUPERGEAR COMICS
SUPERGIRL (American Honda) # 1-2
SUPER HEROES: PRISONERS OF THE STARS
SUPER HEROES: THE SECRET OF THE SINISTER LIGHTHOUSE
SUPERMAN [first series] # 78/3, 330
SUPERMAN (Power Records) # 28, 34
SUPERMAN AT BLOOMINGDALES
SUPERMAN: LUTHOR'S IMPOSSIBLE CRIME
SUPERMAN SPECIAL [first series] # 2
SUPERMAN: TERRA-MAN'S SKYWAY ROBBERY
SUPERMAN: THIS ISLAND BRADMAN
SUPERMAN VS. METALLO
SUPERMAN'S GIRL FRIEND, LOIS LANE # 59
SUPERMAN'S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN # 36/2, 109
SUPER POWERS [first series] # 1-5; [second series] 1-6; [third series] 1-4
SUPER POWERS COLLECTION # 1-23
VIEWMASTER MINI COMICS # 1-9
Wonder Woman [first series] # 167/1, 170/1
WONDER WOMAN (Power Records) # 35
WONDER WOMAN AND THE STAR RIDERS VS. PURRSIA
WONDER WOMAN: THE ANGLE MENACE
WONDER WOMAN: THE CHEETAH'S JEWEL CAPER
WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 223, 227

"EARTH-40" (home of non-canonical Golden Age stories and named after the 1940s):

A world on which Billy Batson became a hero named Captain Thunder. Also the home of a Superboy who was raised in Metropolis and a Wonder Woman who was active during World War Two and participated in several adventures that were similar to those of Earth-2's Diana. By the early 1960s, Bruce Wayne had retired to make way for "the second Batman and Robin team." First seen in BATMAN [first series] # 32/2 and revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
ADVENTURE COMICS # 120/1
BATMAN # 32/2, 131, 135, 145, 159, 163
BATMAN: THE DAILIES # 1-3
BATMAN: THE SUNDAY CLASSICS
THE LEGEND OF WONDER WOMAN # 1-4
THE SHAZAM! ARCHIVES # 1
SUPERMAN [first series] # 46/3
WONDER WOMAN [first series] # 50/1, 156, 159-165, 168

"EARTH-61*" (named after the year in which the story begins -- 1961):

A world where a female Joker named Bianca Steeplechase killed Robin in 1961 and where Bruce Wayne was inspired to become Batman and join Batgirl in 1962 (THRILLKILLER # 1-3; THRILLKILLER '62).

"EARTH-85" (home of post-Crisis stories that later fell from grace and named after the year the Crisis took place -- 1985):

An Earth where Batman had a child with Talia (BATMAN: SON OF THE DEMON), a murderous Catwoman owned a nightclub (ACTION COMICS # 611-614) and Captain Marvel operated out of San Francisco (SHAZAM!: A NEW BEGINNING # 1-4), among other deviations.

Appearances:
ACTION COMICS # 588
ACTION COMICS WEEKLY # 611-614, 623-626
BATMAN: BRIDE OF THE DEMON
BATMAN: BROTHERHOOD OF THE BAT
BATMAN: LEAGUE OF BATMEN # 1-2
BATMAN: SON OF THE DEMON
CREATURE COMMANDOS # 1-8
DETECTIVE COMICS # 569-570
HAWKMAN [second series] # 1-17
POWER OF THE ATOM # 4
SHADE, THE CHANGING MAN [second series] # 1-70
SHAZAM!: THE NEW BEGINNING # 1-4

"EARTH-96*" (named after the year KINGDOM COME was published -- 1996):

An Earth whose metahuman population ran out of control, culminating in a catastrophic nuclear strike (KINGDOM COME # 1-4. Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
GOG (VILLAINS) # 1
THE KINGDOM # 1-2
THE KINGDOM: KID FLASH # 1
THE KINGDOM: NIGHTSTAR # 1
THE KINGDOM: OFFSPRING # 1
THE KINGDOM: PLANET KRYPTON # 1
THE KINGDOM: SON OF THE BAT # 1
KINGDOM COME # 1-4
KINGDOM COME: COLLECTED EDITION
KINGDOM COME: REVELATIONS (text)
THE TITANS # 22-25

"EARTH-97*"(named after the year TANGENT COMICS debuted -- 1997):

A world that was radically changed by Arthur Thompson's emergence as the Atom during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 (TANGENT COMICS/THE ATOM # 1). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
TANGENT COMICS/ THE ATOM# 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE BATMAN # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ DOOM PATROL # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE FLASH # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ GREEN LANTERN # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ JLA # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE JOKER # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE JOKER'S WILD # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ METAL MEN # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ NIGHTWING # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ NIGHTWING: NIGHT FORCE # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ POWERGIRL # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ SEA DEVILS # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ SECRET SIX # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE SUPERMAN # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ TALES OF THE GREEN LANTERN # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ THE TRIALS OF THE FLASH # 1
TANGENT COMICS/ WONDER WOMAN # 1

"EARTH-136" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 136):

An Earth without a Batman. Its population included Bruce (Superman) Wayne and a Lois Lane double named Vicki Vale (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 136).

"EARTH-148" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 148):

A world characterized by heroic counterparts of Clayface, Luthor, and Mirror Master and villainous versions of Batman, Flash, and Superman. Existence revealed in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 148. Also seen in THE FLASH [first series] # 174 and SUPER FRIENDS # 23.

"EARTH-153" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 153):

An Earth whose Batman, ultimately killed by Luthor, had wrongly blamed Superman for the deaths of his parents (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 153).

"EARTH-154*" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 154):

Home of a married Clark Kent & Lois Lane and Bruce Wayne & Kathy Kane and their heroic sons (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 154, 157).

"EARTH-167*" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 167):

Home of Lex (Superman) Luthor and Clark (Batman) Kent (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 167).

"EARTH-172*" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 172):

A world where Bruce Wayne was adopted by the Kents and became Clark's brother. As Batman, he relocated to the Legion of Super-Heroes' 30th century (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 172).

"EARTH-178*" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 178):

Home of a Superman who lost his powers and adopted the costumed identity of The Nova (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 178, 180). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

"EARTH-184*" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 184):

A world whose Robin was caretaker for a mentally impaired Batman and a blind Superman (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 184).

"EARTH-216" (named after WORLD'S FINEST # 216):

A world where Superman and Batman each had namesake offspring who often operated as the Super-Sons (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 215). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 215-216, 221-222, 224, 228, 230-231, 233, 238, 242, 263

"EARTH-271" (named after the month and year -- February, 1971 -- of the first unofficial DC/Marvel crossover in JLA # 87 and AVENGERS # 85):

An Earth populated by both DC and Marvel heroes as well as those from other companies. First seen in SUPERMAN VS. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN.

Appearances:
AZRAEL/ASH
BATMAN/DAREDEVIL
BATMAN/PUNISHER: LAKE OF FIRE
BATMAN-SPAWN: WAR DEVIL
BATMAN/SPIDER-MAN
CATWOMAN/VAMPIRELLA
DAREDEVIL/BATMAN
THE DARKNESS/BATMAN
DC SPECIAL SERIES # 27
GHOST/BATGIRL # 1-4
JLA/WITCHBLADE
MARVEL AND DC PRESENT featuring THE UNCANNY X-MEN and THE NEW TEEN TITANS # 1
MARVEL TREASURY EDITION # 28
PUNISHER/BATMAN: DEADLY KNIGHTS
SPAWN-BATMAN
SPIDER-MAN AND BATMAN
SUPERMAN VS. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN

"EARTH-353*" (named after SUPERMAN # 353):

A world on which Kal-El was adopted by Thomas and Martha Wayne, eventually becoming Superman and, as Bruce Wayne, marrying Barbara Gordon (SUPERMAN [first series] # 353, 358, 363).

"EARTH-391*" (named after ACTION COMICS # 391):

An world on which Superman and Batman each fathered heroic sons and on which Superman, Jr. eventually succeeded his father (ACTION COMICS # 391-392).

"EARTH-395" (named after the month and date -- March, 1995 -- that KAL was published):

An Earth where the Kryptonian known as Kal fought and died as an armored knight and where a bat-man known as the Dark Knight fought on behalf of Merlin during King Arthur's final days. First seen in SUPERMAN: KAL and revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
BATMAN: DARK KNIGHT OF THE ROUND TABLE # 1-2
SUPERBOY [third series] # 61-62, 64
SUPERMAN: KAL

"EARTH-494" (named after the month and date -- April, 1994 -- that DETECTIVE ANNUAL # 7 was published):

A world where a pirate Leatherwing fought alongside allies such as Alfredo, Robin Redblade and Felina hundreds of years in the past. First seen in DETECTIVE COMICS ANNUAL # 7 (April, 1994):

Appearances:
THE BATMAN CHRONICLES # 11
DETECTIVE COMICS ANNUAL # 7

"EARTH-496*" (named after the month and date -- April, 1996 -- that DC VS. MARVEL # 3 was published):

Home of amalgamated versions of DC and Marvel's heroes. First seen in MARVEL VERSUS DC/DC VERSUS MARVEL # 3 (April, 1996).

Appearances:
AMAZON # 1
ASSASSINS # 1
BAT-THING # 1
BRUCE WAYNE, AGENT OF S.H.I.E.L.D. # 1
BULLETS AND BRACELETS # 1
CHALLENGERS OF THE FANTASTIC # 1
DC VERSUS MARVEL/MARVEL VERSUS DC # 4
DOCTOR STRANGEFATE # 1
EXCITING X-PATROL # 1
GENERATION HEX # 1
IRON LANTERN # 1
JLX # 1
JLX UNLEASHED # 1
LEGENDS OF THE DARK CLAW # 1
MAGNETIC MEN FEATURING MAGNETO # 1
MAGNETO AND THE MAGNETIC MEN # 1
MARVEL VERSUS DC/DC VERSUS MARVEL # 3
SPEED DEMON # 1
SPIDER-BOY # 1
SPIDER-BOY TEAM-UP # 1
SUPER SOLDIER # 1
SUPER SOLDIER: MAN OF WAR # 1
THORION OF THE NEW ASGODS # 1
X-PATROL # 1

"EARTH-500" (named after DETECTIVE # 500):

A world with no Paradise Island or Krypton that contained a young Bruce Wayne training to be become his Earth's Batman (DETECTIVE COMICS # 500).

"EARTH-898" (named after the month and date -- August, 1998 -- that THE NAIL was published):

A world where a genetically-altered Jimmy Olsen threatened Earth's entire metahuman population until the hero destined to be known as Superman rose up to stop him (JLA: THE NAIL # 1-3). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

"EARTH-992" (named after the month and date -- September, 1992 -- that "Batman: The Animated Series" went on the air):

An Earth populated by less dark incarnations of the heroes of the present-day DC universe. First appearance in THE BATMAN ADVENTURES # 1.

Appearances:
ADVENTURES IN THE DC UNIVERSE # 1-18
ADVENTURES IN THE DC UNIVERSE ANNUAL # 1
THE BATMAN ADVENTURES # 1-36
THE BATMAN ADVENTURES ANNUAL # 1-2
THE BATMAN ADVENTURES HOLIDAY SPECIAL # 1
THE BATMAN ADVENTURES: MAD LOVE
THE BATMAN ADVENTURES: THE LOST YEARS # 1-5
THE BATMAN AND ROBIN ADVENTURES # 1-25
THE BATMAN AND ROBIN ADVENTURES ANNUAL # 1-2
THE BATMAN AND ROBIN ADVENTURES -SPECIAL COLLECTOR'S EDITION
THE BATMAN AND ROBIN ADVENTURES: SUB-ZERO
BATMAN AND SUPERMAN: ADVENTURES: WORLD'S FINEST
BATMAN BEYOND [first series] # 1-6; [second series] 1-22
BATMAN BEYOND: RETURN OF THE JOKER # 1
BATMAN: EGO
BATMAN: GOTHAM ADVENTURES # 1-on
BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS # 14
BATMAN: MASK OF THE PHANTASM - THE ANIMATED MOVIE
JOKER/MASK # 1-4
JUSTICE LEAGUE ADVENTURES # 1-on
SUPERMAN ADVENTURES # 1-65
SUPERMAN ADVENTURES ANNUAL # 1
SUPERMAN ADVENTURES SPECIAL # 1
SUPERMAN AND BATMAN MAGAZINE # 1-8

"EARTH-1098" (named after the month and date -- October, 1998 -- that ELSEWORLD'S FINEST: S & B was published):

A world whose preeminent costumed champions are Supergirl and Batgirl, members of a Justice Society that also included Ambush Bug, Barda, Interceptor, Revenant, Vectron and others (ELSEWORLD'S FINEST: SUPERGIRL & BATGIRL). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
ELSEWORLD'S FINEST: SUPERGIRL & BATGIRL
SUPERBOY [third series] # 61-62, 64

"EARTH-1099" (named after the month and date -- October, 1999 -- that GUARDIAN OF GOTHAM was published):

A world where Gotham City's greatest heroine was the Catwoman and its most notorious villain was The Batman (CATWOMAN: GUARDIAN OF GOTHAM # 1-2). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

"EARTH-1191" (named after the month and date -- November, 1991 -- that RED RAIN was published):

Home of a Batman who was transformed into a vampire by Dracula. First appearance in BATMAN & DRACULA: RED RAIN (November, 1991).

Appearances:
BATMAN & DRACULA: RED RAIN
BATMAN: BLOODSTORM
BATMAN: CRIMSON MIST.

"EARTH-1278" (named after the month and date -- December, 1978 -- that "Superman The Movie" had its theatrical release):

The home of the theatrical incarnations of DC's heroes. First seen in THE SAGA OF SWAMP THING ANNUAL # 1.

Appearances:
BATMAN: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION OF THE WARNER BROS. MOTION PICTURE
BATMAN FOREVER: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION OF THE WARNER BROS. MOTION PICTURE
BATMAN RETURNS: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION OF THE WARNER BROS. MOTION PICTURE
THE FLASH TV SPECIAL # 1
HUMAN TARGET SPECIAL # 1
THE SAGA OF SWAMP THING ANNUAL # 1
STEEL: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION OF THE WARNER BROS. MOTION PICTURE
SUPERMAN IV MOVIE SPECIAL # 1
SUPERGIRL MOVIE SPECIAL # 1
THE SUPERMAN MOVIE SPECIAL # 1

"EARTH-1289" (named after the month and date -- December, 1989 -- that the Batman comic strip debuted):

An Earth where Batman and Robin fought the Riddler on their first formal case and where Harvey "Two Face" Dent was ultimately rehabilitated. First seen in COMICS REVUE # 41.

Appearances:
COMICS REVUE # 41-66.

"EARTH-1889" (named after the year that GOTHAM BY GASLIGHT took place):

A world on which Bruce Wayne began his career as Batman in 1889. First appearance in GOTHAM BY GASLIGHT. Also seen in BATMAN: MASTER OF THE FUTURE. Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

"EARTH-1927" (named after the year the "Metropolis" had its theatrical release):

Home of the clockwork city of Metropolis where the Super-Man once fought Lutor and Bruss Wayne-Son took the alias of the Nosferatu. First seen in SUPERMAN'S METROPOLIS.

Appearances:
BATMAN: NOSFERATU
SUPERMAN'S METROPOLIS

"EARTH-3839" (named after the years that Superman and Batman debuted -- 1938 and 1939):

A world where Superman and Lois Lane were the parents of children named Joel and Kara and where Batman was succeeded by Dick Grayson and, later, his own son. First seen in BATMAN/CAPTAIN AMERICA and revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
BATMAN/CAPTAIN AMERICA
BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS # 2, 9, 12
SUPERMAN & BATMAN: GENERATIONS # 1-4
SUPERMAN & BATMAN: GENERATIONS II # 1-4

EARTH-PRIME:

An Earth whose population includes several DC Comics staffers who have the ability to control the lives of heroes on other Earths. Two super-heroes (Ultraa and Superboy) eventually came into existence here. First appeared in GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 29 (June, 1964), revealed as a distinct world in THE FLASH [first series] # 179 (May, 1968) and named in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 123 (October, 1975).

Appearances:
ALL-STAR SQUADRON # 14
BATMAN: SCAR OF THE BAT
THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD [first series] # 124
DC CHALLENGE # 2
DC COMICS PRESENTS # 87
DC SPECIAL # 5
DETECTIVE COMICS # 343, 347, 482
DOOM PATROL [first series] # 121
THE FLASH [first series] # 179, 228; [second series] 159
GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 29, 45
JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 123-124, 153, 207-208
THE NEW TEEN TITANS [first series] # 20
SUPERBOY [first series] # 182
SUPERMAN [first series] # 411
SUPERMAN ANNUAL [first series] # 9/2

Xanadude
Member
posted April 03, 2002 08:26 PM

Is Earth-HB (for Hanna Barbera) a legit alternate world? This would be the world of the Super Friends cartoon, which, by inference, also includes the other Hanna Barbera cartoon heroes (Wonder Woman and Aquaman have met the Powerpuff Girls, and other SF have appeared on Harvey Birdman, which included the Jonny Quest characters in another episode, and Birdman exists in the same universe as Space Ghost and Blue Falcon, so....)

Xanadude
Member
posted April 07, 2002 06:32 PM

What ever happened to the second Batcave in California? When Batman rejoined the Outsiders at the end of their first series, he established a Batcave West - is this still around, or even in continuity?

Mikishawm
Member
posted April 08, 2002 05:26 AM

"Earth-HB" sounds like a legit world to me. Are the Powerpuff Girls Hanna Barbera characters though ? Maybe an "Earth-CN" (for Cartoon Network) might be more inclusive.

The famous Batcave West (from 1987's OUTSIDERS # 19, 20 and 27) is still around as far as I can tell. Of course, since it was designed by Helga Jace (later revealed as a Manhunter operative), Batman may have assumed that its security was compromised and scrapped the entire facility.

Hellstone
Member
posted April 17, 2002 09:36 AM

After purchasing a stack of Bronze Age comics, I gotta add a "League of Assassins" appearance to Mikishawm's list. They appeared in a Hostess ad in the 70s, too. And were defeated by a bunch of Twinkies.

/ola

Xanadude
Member
posted April 17, 2002 05:18 PM

Yet another Bat-alternate world...

Earth F (for Filmation)

A world where Batman fights crime with Robin, Batgirl, and Bat-Mite but is NOT a member of the JLA or any formal group.

Other heroes on this world include: Superman, Aquaman, Aqualad, Flash, Kid Flash, Speedy (but no Green Arrow!), Wonder Girl (Wonder Woman possibly, since she only appeared once in a story taking place inAncient Greece), Hawkman, the Marvel Family, Isis, the Freedom Force (Isis and pals), the Space Sentinels, and more....

See link for more:
http://lavender.fortunecity.com/clockwork/616/

Also, the Super Friends probably exist on several worlds;

Earth 1A, the world of the comic book SUPER FRIENDS
Earth 1B, the world of the SUPER FRIENDS TV show
Earth 1C, the world of the SUPER POWERS comic books
Earth CN, the shared world of the Cartoon Network characters

Since it was established that the comic book SUPER FRIENDS were on Earth 1A, I kinda just extrapolated names for the others.

moira
Member
posted May 02, 2002 03:25 AM

Could I please have some help identifying and finding this story.? I think I have the details, I just cannot remember when or where it occurs.

It begins with what I remember being a group of Darkseid's warriors racing to catch the last boom tube out of Gotham. some sort of battle having been lost. One of them does not make it and is left behind. He retreats into the sewers. Food becomes an issue. People disappear. A policeman has a look and I believe he becomes a partially eaten addition to the warrior's larder. Batman becomes involved.

If someone could tell me what this story was, where I can find it and, , that I am remembering correctly that this is a Batman and not a Superman story, I would really appreciate it.

Thank you,

M

Xanadude
Member
posted May 02, 2002 04:41 PM

I think this is COSMIC ODYSSEY.

Mikishawm
Member
posted May 02, 2002 06:13 PM

Yep, it's definitely COSMIC ODYSSEY # 1 (1988). It opens with Superman and Lightray chasing a squad of Dog Soldiers out of Gotham but, yep, one is left behind. Batman tracks him down in the sewers and finds the partially eaten bodies of a policeman and two others.

outpost2
Member
posted May 06, 2002 11:15 PM

From the 'Obscure DC Characters' thread...

STARMAN

Alter Ego: Bruce Wayne, alias Batman
Occupation: Millionaire Socialite
Known Relatives: Thomas Wayne (father, deceased); Martha Wayne (mother, deceased); Richard "Dick" Grayson (legal ward)
Group Affiliation: None
Base of Operations: Gotham City (Earth-One)
First Appearance: Detective Comics #247 (September 1957)
Height: 6 ft. 2 in.
Weight: 210 lbs.
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Black

History: Renegade scientist, Professor Milo, gathers three members of the underworld in his secret laboratory to discuss the problem of Batman. He explains that others have failed at crime because of the caped crusader, but believes he shall succeed by defeating Batman through a phobia. After many years of research, he has developed a substance so precious it can only be used once, a substance that will make Batman helpless against their march of crime.

The next day, at a charity benefit, where Batman is an honored guest, Milo paints the phobia liquid on a spotlight lens which mimics the bat-signal. When Batman is introduced, Milo's henchman projects the image of the bat into Batman's eyes. Batman is stunned by the bright light, begins to feel a little dizzy, and excuses himself as he is helped off-stage by his partner, Robin. The heroes return to their home and their civilian identities of Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson.

That night, when Batman and Robin are summoned with the real bat-signal, Bruce finds he cannot look at his own bat emblem. He rips the emblem off and dons his costume. When they reach the Batmobile, Batman finds he cannot enter it, and the duo are forced to tend to the crime on foot. Shortly, at the Gotham Art Museum, Batman and Robin confront three art thieves. When Batman pulls out one of his batarangs, he goes into a sudden panic, and the criminals escape with the stolen artwork. The thieves report back to Professor Milo that the phobia works.

The following night, Batman and Robin again answer a call from the police. When Batman corners the criminals on a building rooftop, one of them opens a small box and lets loose a bat. Batman is so panic-stricken, he falls off the edge of the building. Robin saves his partner, but the criminals again escape with their stolen goods.

Later, back at the Batcave, Batman concludes that someone has given him an artificial phobia against bats. In the days that follow, Batman's phobia gets so bad that he is forced to retire. Batman brings Robin to Police Commissioner Gordon's office to inform the police that, from that moment on, Robin will be working with a new partner, Starman. Within an hour, news of Batman's retirement spreads around the world.

The next time the police are faced with a crime they cannot handle, they project a star-signal into the night sky. Starman and Robin arrive at the crime in progress in a hovering Star-Plane. Using their fists and a handful of star-darts, the heroes capture the four thugs and bring them into custody.

Back at their new headquarters, the Star-Loft, Bruce confides in Dick that it won't be long before people guess that Starman is actually Batman, and criminals will begin to use his bat phobia against him once more. When Dick asks if there are cures for phobias, Bruce explains that the person can be made to realize that there's nothing to fear, but it usually takes time. Before he can react, Dick straps Bruce to a chair and rolls out a news reel projector. Dick begins showing films of the exploits of Batman, deafening himself to Bruce's pleas to stop. As scene after scene flashes before him, Bruce begins to relax. Elsewhere, Professor Milo proclaims to his men that it is obvious that Starman is really Batman in another costume. Milo states that he has come up with a bat-scare that will finish Batman for good.

Later that night, as bandits make off with a factory payroll, Starman and Robin arrive. The criminals are prepared, and unleash a huge bat-shaped balloon. Instead of being frightened, as expected, Starman and Robin jump aboard the bat-balloon and ride it towards the thieves. Two are captured immediately. Starman then captures the remaining two who are fleeing by slashing the floating balloon with a stararang. Starman quickly learns of Professor Milo's whereabouts from his prisoners. He soon arrives at the secret lab, confronting Milo. The cunning scientist quickly holds up a paper cutout of a bat, believing it will stop his attacker, but Starman merely punches through it and into Milo's jaw. Starman then reveals his Batman costume underneath, showing that the phobia no longer has any effect. The world soon learns that Batman is back.

Weapons and Powers: Bruce Wayne has been trained in numerous fighting techniques and is an expert in hand-to-hand combat. He is a man of great intelligence and ingenuity and, as Batman, is renowned for his superior detective skills. As Starman, he flew a robot controlled Star-Plane, which was kept at it's secret hanger, the Star-Loft. Among other weapons, Starman wielded star-darts and the stararang.

Comments: This portion of Batman's history was eliminated by the events of the Crisis on Infinite Earths. In the revised history, a hero resembling the one described above was active for a year and a day, from January 1951 to January 1952. This hero was, in fact, two separate individuals: Dr. Charles McNider, a.k.a. Dr. Mid-Nite, and David Knight, the time-traveling son of the original Starman.

Charles McNider replaced Ted Knight, the original Starman, who had suffered a mental breakdown, from January 1951 to early December 1951. When David Knight, the fifth Starman, was snatched from the moment just prior to his death and transported through time to early December 1951, he was trained by McNider as his replacement. David was active from December 1951 to January 2nd 1952, and was believed by the general public to be the same Starman that had been fighting crime for the last eleven months.

The post-Crisis Starman was first mentioned in Starman [second series] #2 (December 1994), made a cameo appearance in Starman Secret Files #1 (April 1998), and made his first full appearance in Starman 80-Page Giant #1 (Jan 1999).

Xanadude
Member
posted May 09, 2002 04:29 PM

How about the Bat-romance interests? With Vesper's death, I got to thinking of the women in Bruce's life - after some brainstorming, I think I have most listed, but have I missed?

Julie Madison
Linda Page
Vicki Vale
Batwoman/Kathy Kane
Black Canary (well, they flirted in JLA)
Marcia Monroe
Patricia Powell
Silver St. Cloud
Catwoman/Selina Kyle
Nocturna/Natalia Knight
Dr. Shondra Kinsolving
Vesper Fairchild

Earl Cooper
Member
posted May 09, 2002 04:39 PM

Sasha Bordeaux (even though we have yet to see if he shares her feelings)

GothamCity
Member
posted May 09, 2002 07:48 PM

You've left Talia off the list.

GothamCity
Member
posted May 09, 2002 09:40 PM

Anyone know Bruce's middle name?



jaygon
Member
posted May 10, 2002 04:40 PM

Hi Miki,
Glad to see that this post is still going. Haven't posted in a while but I've been following.I'd also like to congradulate you on the Batgirl/Oracle site. It's always a pleasure.

If you haven't already guessed.... I'm after a favour. I'm currently working on a project involving Batman's history -a detailed history- I've shifted through thousands of pages of material (this archive was most helpful). I've hit a dead end. Plainly speaking - CATWOMAN.
After much anguish I've traced her pre-crisis history right up to the revamp but thats it. I have very little knowledge of the post-crisis selena and no website offers as detailed a story as I need.
So post-crisis Catwoman, the last peice of my puzzle-could you help me? I'd be really grateful.
Jay.



Mikishawm
Member
posted May 12, 2002 08:32 AM

Wow, lots of stuff to comment on!

Outpost, many thanks for Starman bio. It was great!

Gotham City, Bruce's middle name has never been revealed but I've been advocating this:

Bruce Robert Wayne and James William Gordon ... as in Bob Kane and Bill Finger.

Xanadude, I can't immediately think of any of Batman's love interests that have been missed here but I suspect there are a few. I'll do some more checking.

Jay, I've long been thinking about a Catwoman timeline just to sort out her tangled post-Crisis history for my OWN satisfaction. No guesses as to when it'll happen, though.

And, no, I don't have my own website though there is a guy named Mickey who asked to post my Barbara/Oracle timeline at his site. I'm sure that's what Jay saw.

Speaking of the web, I am going to be making a few appearances at other sites in the next couple months though it's too soon to give any details.

In the meantime, the new Page-By-Page feature is up at the POWER COMPANY Board and my Hawkman Timeline is finally posted at FANZING. There's lots of info on Carter Hall's Golden Age adventures, details on which Silver Age stories are still canonical (at least in my estimation) and much more. Fair warning -- it's a long one ... but I think you'll enjoy it. The link is at:

http://www.fanzing.com/mag/fanzing44/feature1.shtml


Also at the site is a Sanders/Saunders family tree. The link is at:

http://www.fanzing.com/mag/fanzing44/feature3.shtml


Here's hoping it'll answer some questions for you Hawk-fans ... and, hey, don't get eye-strain from all that reading! Thanks for keeping the faith during my long absences here.

John Wells



outpost2
Member
posted May 13, 2002 04:37 PM

Miki, thanks for the kind words.

Thought this thread had long expired. You had taken a break months ago around page 14. I only found out a few weeks ago that it's still running and up to page 24! I've started working on catching up on the thread archive, should be done soon.

There's another reason "Robert" makes a good middle name for Bruce Wayne. A long time ago, possibly in Steranko's History of Comics or Jules Feiffer's The Great Comic Book Heroes, I recall reading that the name "Bruce" was based on Scotland's "Robert the Bruce".

In regard to your Hawkman timeline, great work! How many of these have you done so far? Batgirl, Flamebird, Black Canary, more? Any likelihood that, some day, you'll merge them all into one big 20th century timeline?



Xanadude
Member
posted May 13, 2002 08:38 PM

One last question before I head off on vacation for a week - I got a copy of BATMAN #400 today - Ive identified most of the major villains, but there are a lot of minor ones in the background. I know that Mikishawm cites this issue in many of the Bat-villain histories, but how many actually appeared in this issue? And which ones?

Thanks!



datalore
Member
posted May 14, 2002 02:26 PM

Actually was going through this one myself, so...

Black Mask - Roman Sionis
First appeared in BATMAN # 386, a mob boss of Gotham with a... well, Black Mask.

Black Spider - Eric Needham
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 463, he tried to clean up Gotham's drug lords, but by extreme methods.

Calendar Man - Julian Day
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 259, and, at one time, just a guy in a costume with a calender fetish (not the Hannibal Lector guy we've seen lately in the Long Halloween...)

Captain Stingaree
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 460. He's the pirate looking guy, and as well as trying to "kill Batman in triplicate", he was a member of the Secret Society of Super-Villians.

Cat-Man - Thomas Blake
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 311. A failure as a criminal, Thomas believed he had luck from his costume (including, at one point, nine lives). After BATMAN #400, he was apprehended by Manhunter (Mark Shaw), and later faced Batman as part of an "all-losers squad" with Killer Moth...

Catwoman - Selina Kyle
Think we all know her...

Cavalier - Mortimer Drake
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 81 (golden age), and silver age in WONDER WOMAN # 212, and he also partnered with Killer Frost for a time to fence with Batgirl & Robin in BATMAN FAMILY.

Clayface III - Preston Payne
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 477, and got his powers from taking a sample from Clayface II. He gave himself a degenerative skin condition which could only be stopped by absorbing humans. He also later worked with all the Clayfaces in the Mud Pack, and had a son with Clayface IV.

Cluemaster - Arthur Brown
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 351, as a walking version of Batman's utility belt. After Crisis, he was a member of Major Disaster's Injustice Gang, AND Justice League Antartica, as well as the father of Spoiler. He supposedly died in SUICIDE SQUAD, but that has been later reported to NOT be true...

Crazy Quilt
First appeared in BOY COMMANDOS # 15 (Golden Age) and BATMAN # 316 (Silver Age)... this unsuccessful artist (thanks to being color-blind), was more of a Robin foe (having faced him in Robin's solo feature in STAR-SPANGLED COMICS?), but came back to menace Jason Todd later on. He's also been seen recently at both Belle Reve (when Neron freed the prisoners, and when the JLA went their just before the start of "World War III").

WHEW.

More to follow (and, credit where it is due... along with my having looked through the book, I got some of the above info from both DC's WHO'S WHO, and some from Tenzil Kim's [I]Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe[/I].... as well as having read at least ONE appearance with all the above; honest; I'm not as smart as I appear...)



datalore
Member
posted May 14, 2002 02:53 PM

Okay, a little more...

Dagger
First appeared in BATMAN # 343...uh, a guy with a dagger? (I think he was the one with the "D" on his chest...and I barely remember him myself...)

Deadshot - Floyd Lawton
First appeared in BATMAN # 59, revived in current costume in DETECTIVE COMICS # 474. And, after being caught by Flash (Wally West) in the LEGENDS series, he ended up being a mainstay in Amanda Waller's SUICIDE SQUAD. (And one of my favorite characters...)

Doctor Double X - Dr. Simon Ecks
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 261, as a man who made an energy duplicate of himself, and later battled Superman and Batman, and also Batman and Flash, always in that bright yellow and red costume...

Doctor Phosphorus - Alexander Sartorius
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 469, trying to poison Gotham's water supply as punishment for "Gotham turning him radioactive"... he later got more power from Neron, and faced the original Starman, Ted Knight.

Joker ....HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Killer Croc
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 523, and was the man who looked like a crocodile, and tried to take over Gotham's mobs...

Killer Moth
First appeared in BATMAN # 63 (Golden age), and JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 35 (Silver Age), and started as criminals' answer to Batman. He was responsible for trying to kidnap Bruce Wayne, and "forcing" Barbara Gordon to go into action as Batgirl. He also teamed up with Cavalier to fight Batgirl and Robin. He got a rep as being a loser, and approached Neron to get more power. Neron turned him into the barely human Charaxes...

Mad Hatter - Jervis Tetch
First appeared in BATMAN # 49 (Golden age), and in DETECTIVE COMICS # 510 in the Silver Age... he used hats to hide mind-control devices...

Mirage - Kerry Astin
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 511, and fought Batman with illusions. Later, brought in by Manhunter/Mark Shaw, after he beat Mark severely.

Mister Freeze
First appeared in BATMAN # 121, and used cold as a weapon.

Night-Slayer
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 529 as the Thief of the Night, and he was a worshiper of Nocturna. He turned into the Night-Slayer when Nocturna spurned him for Batman (and he had that cool zip-a-tone costume!)

Penguin
WAUGH! WAUGH!

Poison Ivy - Pamela Isley
First appeared in BATMAN # 181, and was a member of Libra's Injustice Gang of the World, as well as the Secret Society of Super-Villains, and used plants against men. She later joined the Suicide Squad, and even later, became much closer to her plants after the Gotham Earthquake...

Ra's Al Ghul
First appeared in BAMAN # 232, and is old and trying to save the world, by getting rid of a large portion of humanity.

Riddler - Edward Nigma
A criminal with a compulsion to sent Batman clues to his crimes...

Scarecrow - Jonathan Crane
Master of fear, but thanks to years of defeats by Batman, scared of him. He was also a member of Libra's Injustice Gang.

Signalman - Phil Cobb
First appeared in BATMAN # 112, and used signals as gimmicks against Batman. After a brief time as the Blue Bowman (a villianous counterpart to Green Arrow), he had a lengthy time in prison, before coming back to trap Batman in the Bat-signal, join the Secret Society of Super-Villains, and menace Batman along with MANY of his fellows here. He hasn't been seen since.

Talia
First appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 411, and is the daughter of Ra's Al Ghul, and currently, the head of LexCorp while Lex Luthor is president.

Tweedledee & Tweedledum
Homicidal twins who first appeared in DETECTIVE COMICS # 74.

Two-Face - Harvey Dent
Only a flip of the coin away from a crime...

(I know I was a bit short on some, SOME due to lack of knowledge, and some, because they have too much! I know Mikishawm covered some earlier... again, just enough to help, and point you in the right direction for the rest!)

Hope this helps!



Lord of Chaos
Member
posted May 15, 2002 07:48 PM

It's a great thread, no question.

Wow. Datalore mentioned The Dagger! Man, his last appearance was ... what? BATMAN #400? Yeesh.



Enda80
Member
posted May 15, 2002 09:17 PM

Earth-Prime
Appearances:
ALL-STAR SQUADRON # 14
BATMAN: SCAR OF THE BAT
THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD [first series] # 124
DC CHALLENGE # 2
DC COMICS PRESENTS # 87
DC SPECIAL # 5
DETECTIVE COMICS # 343, 347, 482
DOOM PATROL [first series] # 121
THE FLASH [first series] # 179, 228; [second series] 159
GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 29, 45
JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 123-124, 153, 207-208
THE NEW TEEN TITANS [first series] # 20
SUPERBOY [first series] # 182
SUPERMAN [first series] # 411
SUPERMAN ANNUAL [first series] # 9/2

Why did you include SCAR OF THE BAT and SUPERBOY #182 as Earth-Prime stories?

I thought SUPERMAN #182 was the one that revealed that Bruce Wayne had used the identity of the Executioner as a youth, and had him thinking that a serial killer called the Zodiac Killer murdered his parents. (Wow, that's dated! Leo Dorfman references both Don Pendleton novels and the real-life Zodiac Killer of the 1970's! And its anachronistic, too, since Superboy was never set as late as the 1970's. Both anachronistic and dated! This story also stated that the Waynes died on November 25th.)

Enda80
Member
posted May 16, 2002 01:35 AM

Actually, it was SUPERBOY #182 that stated that the Waynes were murdered on November 25. http://darkmark6.tripod.com/superboyind3.htm indexes that issue.



datalore
Member
posted May 16, 2002 12:28 PM

Yea, tried to sneak that one in, Lord of Chaos...(couldn't remember him that well either...)

But, these were all the SPECIFIC folks who were in action (not just splash pages) in the issue...

...about half the villains took off, and a few like Dagger and the Signalman, never to be seen again...

And, I think Darkmark would count this as one of the last Silver Age Batman stories... (I've seen his work, and, with all apologies to "borrowing" a Marvel adjective, it is AMAZING! I loved those published indexes done in the 1980s, and really wish we could see more...heck, I've made no secret of my wanting to part of more! I know I'm a relative "newbie" compared to folks like Outpost2, Hellstone, Tenzil Kim and especially the multi-talented Mikishawm, not to mention Murray Ward or Mark Waid or Roy Thomas or Dr. Jerry Bails, or SO many others that do such an awesome job of keeping track of all this stuff...but I try!)

But, back to BATMAN # 400...

One of the things that made me look through the issue again was that I thought Blockbuster was active in the issue, but, looking through it, he was not. Ah, well...



Enda80
Member
posted May 16, 2002 02:53 PM

Here is Dark Mark's entry for BATMAN #400: http://darkmark6.tripod.com/batmanind5.html

Detective Comics No. 566
September 1986
Cover: Batman amidst portraits of Joker, Penguin, Killer Moth, Poison Ivy, Ra's Al Ghul, the Penguin, the Riddler, and Two-Face //Dick Giordano (signed)
Story: "Know Your Foes" (16 pages)
Editor: Len Wein
Writer: Doug Moench
Penciller: Gene Colan
Inker: Bob Smith
Letterer: Todd Klein
Colorist: Adrienne Roy
Feature Characters: Batman (last appearance in SWAMP THING (second series) #54; next appears in BATMAN #400), Robin II (last appearance in BATMAN ANNUAL #10; next appears in BATMAN #400)
Cameo appearances: Joker, Penguin, Killer Moth, Black Mask, Circe, False Face Society, Two-Face, Mad Hatter, Deadshot, Ra's Al Ghul, Talia, Nocturna, Night-Slayer, Poison Ivy, Riddler, Croc, Cat-Man, Black Spider, Crazy-Quilt, Mr. Freeze, Clayface III, Cavalier, Tweedledum, Tweedledee
Comment: Story continues in BATMAN #400.
Synopsis: After receiving a note instructing them to "Know your foes", Batman and Robin review their rogues' gallery.

Batman No. 400
October 1986
Cover: Batman, Robin, bat, Joker, Catwoman, Ra's Al Ghul, Talia //Bill Sienkiewicz (painting)
Story: "Resurrection Night" (1 page)
Chapter 1: "Trading Darkness" (6 pages)
Chapter 2: "The Master Below" (4 pages)
Chapter 3: "First Steps" (3 pages)
Chapter 4: "The Tempting" (7 pages)
Chapter 5: "Pinocchio and Jonah's, Too" (8 pages)
Chapter 6: "Barred" (6 pages)
Chapter 7: "A Small Itch Scratched" (3 pages)
Chapter 8: "The Big Sticking" (4 pages)
Chapter 9: "Branches Like Bones" (3 pages)
Chapter 10: "The Dark Trade" (6 pages)
Chapter 11: "Under the Wind" (7 pages)
Epilogue: "Fated Fete" (2 pages)
Edtior: Len Wein
Writer: Doug Moench
Pencillers: Steve Lightle (pgs. 1-7), George Perez (pgs. 8-11), Paris Cullens (pgs. 12-14), Bill Sienkiewicz (pgs. 15-21), Arthur Adams (pgs. 22-29), Tom Sutton (pgs. 30-35), Steve Leialoha (pgs. 36-38), Joe Kubert (pgs. 39-42), Ken Steacy (pgs. 43-45), Rick Leonardi (pgs. 46-51), Brian Bolland (pgs. 52-60)
Inkers: Bruce D. Patterson (pgs. 1-7), George Perez (pgs. 8-11), Larry Mahlstedt (pgs. 12-14), Bill Sienkiewicz (pgs. 15-21), Terry Austin (pgs. 22-29), Ricardo Villagran (pgs. 30-35), Steve Leialoha (pgs. 36-38), Joe Kubert (pgs. 39-42), Ken Steacy (pgs. 43-45), Karl Kesel (pgs. 46-51), Brian Bolland (pgs. 52-60)
Letterers: John Costanza (pgs. 1-35, 43-60), Tom Orzechowski (pgs. 36-38), Andy Kubert (pgs. 39-42)
Colorist: Adrienne Roy
Feature Characters: Batman (between DETECTIVE COMICS #566 / 567), Robin II (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #566; last appearance)
GS: Catwoman (last appearance)
Supporting Characters: Alfred Pennyworth (next appears in DETECTIVE COMICS #567), Commissioner Gordon, Harvey Bullock (last appearance for both in SWAMP THING (second series) #54; last appearance for both), Julia Pennyworth, Vicki Vale (last appearance for both in BATMAN ANNUAL #10; last appearance for both), Talia (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #526; last appearance)
Cameo appearance: Mirror-Man
Villains: The Joker, Two-Face, Clayface III (last appearance for all in SWAMP THING (second series) #52; last appearance for all), Black Mask (last appearance in issue #387; last appearance), Mad Hatter (last appearance in issue #379; last appearance), Croc, the Cavalier, Captain Stingaree, Tweedledum, Tweedledee (last appearance for all in DETECTIVE COMICS #526; last appearance for all), the Riddler, the Penguin, Poison Ivy, Cat-Man, Black Spider, Killer Moth, Cluemaster, Dr. Phosphorus, the Scarecrow (last appearance for all in CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS #9; last appearance for all), Calendar Man, Deadshot, Dr. X, Dr. Double X (last appearance for all in CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS #10; last appearance for all), Crazy-Quilt (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #535), Dagger (last appearance in issue #343; last appearance), Mr. Freeze (last appearance in issue #375; last appearance), Signalman (last appearance in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #197; last appearance), Mirage (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #511; last appearance), Night-Slayer (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #558; last appearance), Ra's Al Ghul (last appearance in BATMAN ANNUAL #8; last appearance; possibly dies in this story), Stick Chuvalo and his gang (first and only appearance for all), the League of Assassins (last appearance in DETECTIVE COMICS #490; last appearance)
Comment: Story continues from DETECTIVE COMICS #566.
Synopsis: Ra's Al Ghul frees all the Batman's old foes from Arkham Asylum and Gotham Prison, then has them kidnap the Caped Crusader's friends and allies in order to try to maneuver him into an alliance.

Detective Comics No. 567
October 1986
Cover: Batman on Gotham skyline //Klaus Janson (signed)
Story: "The Night of Thanks, But No Thanks" (15 pages)
Editor: Len Wein
Writer: Harlan Ellison
Penciller: Gene Colan
Inker: Bob Smith
Letterer: John Costanza
Colorist: Adrienne Roy
Feature Character: Batman (last appearance in BATMAN #400; last appearance)
Supporting Characters: Alfred Pennyworth (last appearance in BATMAN #400; last appearance)
Intro: Schwartz, Rick, Charlene, Bernie and his wife (only appearance for all)
Villains: Various crooks (first and only appearance for all)
Comment: The New Earth Batman probably first appears in JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #255.
It is revealed in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #166 that Batman did marry and sire a line of future Batmen, sometime after this story.
Synopsis: Batman attempts to go into action on a night when he really should have stayed in bed.



Mikishawm
Member
posted May 16, 2002 08:46 PM

Outpost --

You're right! The connection to Robert the Bruce is one more excellent argument is favor of that middle name.

So far, I've done these timelines:

Barbara Gordon
Black Canary
Flamebird
Hawkman
Hippolyta as Wonder Woman in World War Two
Justice Society
Nightwing
Zatara & Zatanna (not-yet-posted)

Any likelihood that, some day, I'll merge them all into one big 20th century timeline? Well, I'll probably be VERY old by that time but, hey, it COULD happen.

Enda80 --

The Earth-Prime appearance in SUPERBOY # 182 isn't the story proper but its first panel, which depicted a DC editorial conference.

As for SCAR OF THE BAT, that was just my prerogative. The story was populated entirely with characters from "our" world (Eliot Ness was Batman) and only a handful of people knew that Batman existed so I figured ... why not ?

Datalore --

Count me as another big fan as Darkmark. He's definitely amazing!



Enda80
Member
posted May 16, 2002 10:08 PM

As for SCAR OF THE BAT, that was just my prerogative. The story was populated entirely with characters from "our" world (Eliot Ness was Batman) and only a handful of people knew that Batman existed so I figured ... why not ?

Max Allan Collins interview: http://www.januarymagazine.com/profiles/collins.html
Denny later gave me the opportunity to do an Elseworlds graphic novel called SCAR OF THE BAT [1995], a Batman/Eliot Ness story that I'm proud of. I like to say that graphic novel is the most historically accurate presentation of the Ness-in-Chicago story ever done...except for having Batman in it.

Hmmm..... I could add that in later to the timeline.



Enda80
Member
posted May 17, 2002 09:03 PM

"EARTH-40" (home of non-canonical Golden Age stories and named after the 1940s):

A world on which Billy Batson became a hero named Captain Thunder. Also the home of a Superboy who was raised in Metropolis and a Wonder Woman who was active during World War Two and participated in several adventures that were similar to those of Earth-2's Diana. By the early 1960s, Bruce Wayne had retired to make way for "the second Batman and Robin team." First seen in BATMAN [first series] # 32/2 and revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).

Appearances:
ADVENTURE COMICS # 120/1
BATMAN # 32/2, 131, 135, 145, 159, 163
BATMAN: THE DAILIES # 1-3
BATMAN: THE SUNDAY CLASSICS
THE LEGEND OF WONDER WOMAN # 1-4
THE SHAZAM! ARCHIVES # 1
SUPERMAN [first series] # 46/3
WONDER WOMAN [first series] # 50/1, 156, 159-165, 168

What was so special about BATMAN #32/2 and SUPERMAN #46/3?

Anyway, another story that might merit inclusion was this story from BRAVE AND BOLD #167: http://ourworld.cs.com/argentprime/batman.htm
Apocrypha: September 19, 1944: Batman joins forces with the Blackhawks to destroy a German base in the Arctic. MW/Dave Cockrum/Dan Adkins
Notes: The Blackhawks were created by Will Eisner and Chuck Cuidera, making their debut in Quality Comics' MILITARY COMICS #1 (8/40). Although this story features the Golden Age Batman, it is apocryphal from the standpoint of Earth-Two continuity. There was no Golden Age Batman on Earth-One, and in April 1942 (as shown in ALL-STAR SQUADRON #50 (10/85)) the Blackhawks of Earth-Two departed for the parallel world of Earth-X, where they later died in action (JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #107 (9-10/73)). The story is included here for the sake of completeness. This issue depicts the Batplane as a heavily modified Curtiss P-40 Warhawk. BRAVE & BOLD 167 10/80



Enda80
Member
posted May 17, 2002 09:23 PM

This is odd; it turns out that there was another Boss Moroni! http://www.execpc.com/~icicle/SUN.html
The Sun and his Satellites

The Moroni Gang gets access to advanced weapons and uses them to become a team of costumed criminals. Boss Moroni becomes The Sun and his aides become the Moon, Saturn, Comet and Mercury.

Issue; Comment; Reprinted in:
ADVENTURE #76; 1st Appearance, vs. Starman; STARMAN ARCHIVES vol. 1
ADVENTURE #89; Comet and Mercury do not appear, vs. Starman;

Back to GA Villain Checklist .



Enda80
Member
posted May 17, 2002 09:47 PM

Oh, vis a vis DETECTIVE COMICS #500, in fact Mikel Midnight has a timeline for it. He called it Earth-5, and identified it with the Earth that was shown being destroyed in CRISIS #1, since no heroes were shown in that sequence. http://blaklion.best.vwh.net/timeline5.html



Mikishawm
Member
posted May 18, 2002 07:02 AM

Thanks for the info about Earth-5!

The story in BATMAN # 32 was a flashback in which Batman was said to have intended for Dick Grayson to retire as Robin once Boss Zucco was brought to justice. Dick then had to prove himself again. The flashback also showed Batman on good terms with Commissioner Gordon and the Gotham police -- despite the fact that he was still regarded as an outlaw at this point -- and depicted the Batcave before it had officially been developed in the series.

The story in SUPERMAN # 46 was about Clark's class reunion at Metropolis High School (rather than Smallville). It was also noted that his classmates called him "Specs".

As for the Blackhawks, I always figured that the mysterious incident that supposedly killed them and Plastic Man (alluded to in JLofA # 107) had actually catapulted them back to Earth-Two, where they resumed their lives as depicted in Quality Comics of the 1940s and 1950s.



Enda80
Member
posted May 18, 2002 03:38 PM

The explanation for those post-World War Two stories in Quality comics was that yet another parallel Earth existed, which was designated Earth-Quality. Earth-Quality also had a counterpart of Kid Eternity, who did exist on Earth-S but not Earth-2 and thus not Earth-X. (This refers to the fact that Kid Eterntiy was actually NOT a Fawcett charachter during the 1940's, but rather a Quality charachter. For some reason, though, when revived, his adventures were set on Earth-S by DC.)



Mikishawm
Member
posted May 24, 2002 05:38 PM

Believe it or not, this thread started two years ago today. And, even though I rarely have a chance to contribute much these days, I want to sincerely thank everyone for the support you've given me. It has really meant a lot.

By a strange twist of fate, I actually do have a new article for you to read today though you'll have to click on the link below to find it. Many of you are probably familiar with longtime BATMAN editor Jack Schiff, who's been unfairly pilloried over the years for his alleged introduction of sci-fi elements into the series in the late 1950s and early 1960s. In his defense, Schiff once told Gene Reed:

"I was having disagreements about the 'monster craze' everybody was into. I fought against the introduction into Batman and Superman of this trend, but I was pressured into using them. At one point, though, I managed to revive some of the old villains like the Joker and the Penguin, and that was what caught the eye of the TV people. I was the one consulted on the material given to them. The sales went up with the villains featured.

"Also, the sale of the BATMAN ANNUALs kept confirming my stand -- they sold terrifically. That, by the way, was why more and more were published during the year instead of the one or two we began with. Letters from fans indicated their liking for the old stories I'd been editing all along, but I didn't win out against the monster craze."

I bring this up because Jack Schiff was responsible for more than just Batman. Click on this link and you'll "Meet Johnny Everyman." I don't think you'll forget him.
http://www.perpetualcomics.com/Column.asp?ColId=LatestTonyIsabella

Thanks again, folks!

John Wells



Energite
Member
posted June 22, 2002 05:38 PM

Here's a new request for you Miki--Has there ever been a complete inventory of Batman Trophy Room?



Mikishawm
Member
posted July 15, 2002 05:21 AM

Just a belated announcement to let everyone know that I've been guest-writing Bob Rozakis' Answer Man column at [I]Silver Bullet Comic Books[/I] while he's teaching at Johns Hopkins University this summer. Today's edition -- dealing with Batgirl and Green Lantern/Green Arrow, can be found at this link:

http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/102671110528924.htm

... and previous columns, covering Spy Smasher, Earth-Two, comics character namesakes and Gasoline Alley, are archived at these links:

http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/10261861701660.htm

http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/102552572329705.htm

http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/102497753467861.htm

Hope you like 'em ... and check back in for the remaining three editions on July 22, 29 and August 5.

John



Osgood Peabody
Member
posted July 20, 2002 01:00 PM

May I have the honor of bumping this venerable thread?

Great work John!

And as a teaser - what Batman story did my Earth-1 namesake appear in?



n-man
New Member
posted July 22, 2002 07:30 AM

A list of some (all??) mayors of Gotham City would be great....

A job for you, miki??

...name, 1st. app. and so forth....



Enda80
Member
posted July 28, 2002 01:26 AM

A while ago, someone asked about Sherlock Holmes and his appearances in Batman stories. Well, here I present relevant info.

Sherlock Holmes has met the Batman in no more than three stories. Possibly a story in 'TEC #500 (I don't have the issue, please admonish me as to that), DC SPECIAL SERIES #8, and 'TEC #572. That last established that Holmes knows his secret identity. Holmes still lives in Tibet, due to a special jelly from bees. Elongated Man, Robin, and Slam Bradley also appear in this story, as does a Moriarty descendant.

DC SPECIAL SERIES #8 presented a Bob Haney Brave and the Bold special, and what with Sgt. Rock and Deadman, along with other Haney-ist touches, stands firmly on Earth-B, where many other wilder stories of Haney ended up. (Earth-B, rest stop of the non-canonical, named after Bob Haney, editor Murray Boltinoff, E. Nelson Bridwell, and the Brave and the Bold) Rich Meyers has a website that summarize the Sgt. Rock/Batman team-ups that deals with this issue-do a google search for "Brave and the Bold" AND "Sgt. Rock". It involved Lucifer (a sequel to one of Haney's Sgt. Rock/Batman team-ups,"the night Batman sold his soul"), and Sherlock Holmes's apparent spirit summoning Deadman.

Sherlock Holmes apparently did not exist on Earth-2. DETECTIVE COMICS #110 indicated that Holmes et al. were fictional as far as Earth-2's history went, with a villain modelling himself after Moriarity. One bit of dialogue indicates that Bob Kane did not read the original Doyle stories-the Moriarty impersonator gets described as altering the original Moriarty's crimes slightly from how Doyle wrote them. In fact, Doyle never described any of Moriarty's crimes, since Moriarty only appeared in one story by Doyle!

(Bob Kane also once made the mistake of saying that killing the Joker in Dark Knight Returns represented a bad idea, as that would be similar to Holmes killing Moriarty. Well, Moriarty did die in his last encounter with Holmes! Twenty buck fine for lack of reading comprehension.)

Surprisingly, the Earth-1 Batman seems to have never met Sherlock Holmes (unless a Carter Nichols story out there makes this statement wrong..... anyone know if Carter Nichols ever sent the Earth-1 Batman back in time to meet Sherlock Holmes?).

Sherlock Holmes of Earth-One

Sherlock Holmes #1
Superboy #110
Detective Comics #500?

Sherlock Holmes of Earth-Four
All New Baffling Adventures of Sherlock Holmes #1-2

Sherlock Holmes of Earth-B
DC Special Series #8

Sherlock Holmes of Earth-Quality
Hit Comics #29
Kid Eternity #4,8,10

Sherlock Holmes of Earth-S
Captain Marvel, Jr. #2
World's Finest Comics #279

Various Alternate Realities/Futures
Justice League Europe Annual #2
Hellblazer #23
Kingdom Come #2

Sherlock Holmes Post-Crisis
Detective Comics #572
Eclipso #7-8

Did I miss anything? Any additional info is welcome.



Mikishawm
Member
posted July 28, 2002 08:26 PM

Enda80 --

Great work on the Holmes info and appearances. The only issues that your list is missing are ACTION COMICS # 283 (in which Superman's wish that Holmes appear is granted). THE JOKER # 6 (where an actor got konked on the head and thought he was Sherlock). DETECTIVE # 500 contains a silhouette of Holmes in a panel that mentions that Edgar Allan Poe inspired Arthur Conan Doyle to create the famous detective.

As for DC SPECIAL SERIES # 8 -- it's goofy but not enough to say that it doesn't take place on Earth-One. That's my opinion, at least.

Regarding DETECTIVE # 110 -- good points on the blunders in the script. Bob Kane didn't write it, though. It was Don Cameron ... with art by Win Mortimer.

Once again, very nice work!


Osgood Peabody --

Thanks for the bump -- though I'm drawing a blank at the moment as to whom your namesake is.


n-man --

Someone asked for a piece on the mayors quite some time back and I never got any farther than some preliminary notes. Here's what I have ...

When Batman debuted, the mayor of Gotham was a white-haired overweight man who was never identified by name and appeared in the story that related Harvey Dent's transformation into Two-Face (BATMAN ANNUAL # 14). The remainder of the Year One/Year Two-era stories featured a bespectacled, slim, middle-aged mayor named Wilson Klass (LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT # 11-15, 47, 84, 105). By Year Three, an unnamed balding, overweight mayor was in office (ROBIN: YEAR ONE # 3).

The first mayor to appear in a Batman story was an unnamed figure clearly intended to represent New York City's Fiorello La Guardia (1942's BATMAN # 12). The next two mayoral appearances that I'm aware of were in # 29 and 30, neither of which I've seen. Next, he showed up (bald and with a monocle) the DETECTIVE # 140's first Riddler story. Next up were BATMAN # 54 and 66, neither of which I've seen. In 1951's DETECTIVE # 179, a lottery selected Bruce Wayne to serve as honorary mayor for a week while white-haired Bradley Stokes was on vacation.

The next appearance I have for a Gotham mayor (white-haired with glasses) was in 1955's WORLD'S FINEST # 76. The next mayor (black hair, no glasses) showed up in 1957's DETECTIVE # 245.

From 1964 to mid-1968, the mayor's appearance varied a bit from story to story (sometimes thin, sometimes fat; sometimes with a mustache, sometimes without) but not so drastically that we can't say it isn't the same person. This (according to DETECTIVE # 375) was Mayor Taylor and he appeared chronologically in WORLD'S FINEST # 140, DETECTIVE # 330, BRAVE & BOLD # 59, BATMAN # 173, BRAVE & BOLD # 67, BATMAN # 186, DETECTIVE # 375 (behind the scenes) and BRAVE & BOLD # 78.

Mayor Hayes (bald, slim) was introduced in BATMAN 207 and was evidently wearing a toupee in his next appearance (BRAVE & BOLD # 81). The Mayor showed up as an unspecified part of Gotham's City Council in B&B # 90 and 94 before being depicted as a bald man (now with a mustache) again in B&B # 102. Thanks to Jim Aparo on the art, the mayor's visage was unchanged in B&B # 105.

The next chronological appearance of a Gotham mayor was in B&B # 113, where a tan-haired younger man (whom I'll call Mayor Haney) swept into office on a reform ticket and promptly retired both Commissioner Gordon and Batman. (Yeah, who knew Bats was an official employee of Gotham's government ?) Circumstances soon proved the mayor made a big mistake and he reinstated both men. "Mayor Haney" reappeared in DETECTIVE # 433 (with blonde hair) and WORLD'S FINEST # 218 (with brown hair). "A kickback scandal" in the latter seems to have gotten him kicked out of office.

His successor was a jowly, considerably older man with a thick mane of gray hair who appeared in the David V. Reed-scripted BATMAN # 270, 275, 283 and behind the scenes in # 302. "Mayor Reed" [my name] seems to have dyed his hair tan and grown a mustache, effective with B&B # 148 (looking rather like Bob "Captain Kangaroo" Keeshan) and was portrayed as such in his next several appearances (SUPER FRIENDS # 22, WORLD'S FINEST # 260 & 262, DETECTIVE # 490 and behind the scenes in # 500). B&B # 150 depicted the mayor as bald, slim and sporting a thin mustache (a throwback to issues # 102 and 105). The vice-mayor perhaps ?

Businessman Hamilton Hill and City Councilman Arthur Reeves ran against each other in the next mayoral election (beginning in DETECTIVE # 503). Hill secretly played Reeves' anti-Batman hysteria against him and caused him to lose the election (BATMAN # 344; DETECTIVE # 511). Hill, however, was in the pocket of corrupt ex-councilman Rupert Thorne and, as mayor, he promptly fired Commissioner Gordon and eventually turned up the heat on Batman. Hill's political career survived a bloody confrontation with Rupert Thorne in the mayor's office (BATMAN # 354) but his crimes ultimately caught up with him and he was arrested by the GCPD (BATMAN # 381).

George P. Skowcroft served as Gotham's acting mayor in the aftermath (DETECTIVE # 551). Both Skowcroft and Lucius Fox (BATMAN # 397; BATMAN ANNUAL # 10) considered running for the office in a special election but the winner was an unidentified man with white hair. He and the entire Gotham City Council were murdered by Deacon Blackfire's followers in BATMAN: THE CULT # 2. The next mayor of Gotham was a gray-haired, mustachioed figure with a shady past whose advisor, Haney, had aspirations of taking Commissioner Gordon's job (DETECTIVE # 626).

That subplot was never continued but another mayor, this one slim and balding, was in office in ROBIN II # 3 and 4. Mayor Lieberman (so-named in BATMAN VS. PREDATOR # 1) also appeared in BATMAN: RUN, RIDDLER, RUN # 1-3 and JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA [second series] # 1. Out of nowhere, an outgoing African American mayor made his first and last appearance in DETECTIVE # 648.

Former district attorney Armand Krol announced his intention of being the next mayor in DETECTIVE # 647 and 648 and was officially in office by SHADOW OF THE BAT # 8 and 9. ROBIN ANNUAL # 1's unnamed mayor is probably Krol's first appearance in the role though the hairstyle is all wrong. Krol lost a close re-election race to Marion Grange (SHADOW OF THE BAT # 46) and died of the Legacy Virus soon after (DETECTIVE # 699).

Marion Grange was Gotham's district attorney when she began her run for mayor (DETECTIVE # 686). As noted, she won the election (SHADOW OF THE BAT # 46) and, because of Krol's bungled handling of the Legacy Plague, she was sworn into office early to help Gotham's recovery (ROBIN # 28). Grange was killed in Washington, D.C. when she hit by a sniper's bullet meant for Bruce Wayne. She was fifty-two (BATMAN # 562).

Daniel Danforth Dickerson II, mayor of the post-No Man's Land Gotham made his bow in DETECTIVE # 743.


B&B seeing you, folks!

John



Enda80
Member
posted July 29, 2002 02:36 PM

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


The only issues that your list is missing are ACTION COMICS # 283 (in which Superman's wish that Holmes appear is granted) THE JOKER # 6 (where an actor got konked on the head and thought he was Sherlock). DETECTIVE # 500 contains a silhouette of Holmes in a panel that mentions that Edgar Allan Poe inspired Arthur Conan Doyle to create the famous detective.

I left those out as those served as duplicates of Sherlock Holmes, not the autentic Holmes of Earth-1.

So 'TEC #500 does not have an appearance of Holmes per se either? Oh well, a missed oppurtunity. (Possibly a continuity problem, too - if Holmes exists only as a fictional charachter in that story, that contradicts stories that established that Holmes did exist on Earth-1.)



Continental Op
Member
posted July 29, 2002 05:05 PM

Osgood Peabody--

Wow! I'm amazed that I'd have anything substantial to contribute to a thread as mind-boggling as this, especially since my Batman-reading has been sporadic at best the past few years, but...

I just happen to have reread your "first appearance" the other day!

I'm going from memory, so bear with me on this... Osgood Peabody was a craven milquetoast type, although a brilliant scientist, who invented an electronic device for duplicating samples of handwriting. Ozzy was pressured into forging Bruce Wayne's signature for a corrupt Gotham City politician by the telling name of Bilker, in BATMAN #245 (by Denny O'Neil, Neal Adams and Dick Giordano). It was all part of a scheme to make Bilker's candidate a sure thing in the upcoming election (although Batman pointed out that neither candidate was really worth anyone's vote, anyway).

Things were complicated by the fact that Batman had just faked Bruce Wayne's death in a plane crash, thereby assuring his freedom to go on an all-out manhunt for Ra's al-Ghul during the epic saga told in issues #240, 242-244. So Bats couldn't just call Bilker's bluff, but he was sharp enough to track down Osgood Peabody and scare a confession out of him.

Unfortunately, Osgood was desperate and, surprisingly, gutsy enough to trick Batman into nearly electrocuting himself with the forgery device, and then clout him over the head before making an escape from his lab.

(As you may remember, back in the 70s, Denny O'Neil and the rest had to follow some kind of unwritten rule where, in at least three-fourths of his stories, Batman had to be taken by surprise and knocked out by the villain. If the villain was a gang boss or colorful mastermind, he would then place Batman in a deathtrap, and if he was an ordinary crook he would simply run away. Sometimes, just to stir things up, a good-intentioned bystander would even zonk Batman from behind, giving the villain time to escape. But this happened with maddening regularity. Even skinny types like the Joker and Maxie Zeus could lay Batman out cold with one blow to the noggin. Batman suffered so many blunt traumas to the head back then, I'm surprised he wasn't drooling in his soup by the time the Ford Administration rolled around.)

Anyway, Peabody foolishly placed his trust in Bilker, assuming his boss would help him flee the country with knowledge of the scam. Bilker and his henchperson drove Peabody to the Gotham waterfront and were about to kill him very dead, when the swiftly-recovering Batman showed up and put an end to the dastardly doings. Bilker's plot was revealed, Bruce Wayne was revealed to have miraculously survived, and all was good once more with the world. Except that Gotham City still ended up with a sleazy,incompetent public official being elected. More on THAT in Mikishawm's mayoral history!



Osgood Peabody
Member
posted August 02, 2002 11:08 AM

C. Op. - right on the money!

This is the name that stuck with an impressionable 11-year old and inspired him to use it constantly in writing exercises, much to the bafflement of his grammar school teachers!

I never thought Osgood made any subsequent appearances, but I've seen references to a text story in a SUPERMAN ANNUAL from 1986 entitled "Osgood Peabody's Big Green Dream Machine" written by Grant Morrison, although I'm not sure if this is the same character.



Enda80
Member
posted August 12, 2002 12:47 PM

Reading over Mikishawn's excellent write-up on Thomas and Martha Wayne, I thought I'd add in some more info by again going to the periphery; the Superboy stories.

The various stories of a pre-Superman Kal-El meeting a young Wayne throw in a bit of a complication here. This happened four times: WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #84, ADVENTURE COMICS #275, SUPERBOY (first series)#182, and SUPERBOY SPECTACULAR #1 (1980).

ADVENTURE COMICS #275 threw in a problem, as it had Wayne temporarily move to Smallville with his parents. This places this story at odds with most accounts of the Earth-1 Batman's origin, as the story showed Thomas and Martha Wayne alive at a later date in Bruce's life than they are usually presumed to have survived to.

Roy Thomas, in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #271, attempted to harmonize the contradiction by stating that Bruce had moved to Smallville with this guardians (namely Philip Wayne, introduced in BATMAN #208). However, Thomas apparently forgot about the story in SUPERBOY #182, which explicitly served as a sequel to the ADVENTURE COMICS #275 story. In SUPERBOY #182 (published February 1972), Superboy discovers about the death of Thomas and Martha Wayne from an old newspaper headline (he had earlier, in ADVENTURE COMICS #275, used a special machine to look into the future to discover his eventual Batman team-ups, which info he temporarily shared with Wayne before erasing it from Wayne's mind with hypnotism), and goes to Wayne Manor. (This story, by the way, gave the date of November 25th for the murder of Thomas and Martha Wayne.)

He discovers that Bruce Wayne has adopted the identity of the Executioner, and believes that his parents fell victim to serial killer that the newspapers have reported about, the Zodiac Killer. However, Superboy and the Executioner discover that in fact no Zodiac Killer existed, rather an unscrupulous reporter named Otis Higbee had been leaving false evidence at the scenes of crimes in order to concoct a headline grabber. Wayne gives up the Executioner identity.

Incidentally, Thomas stated in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #271 that Superboy at some point erased his own memories of having used the future prediction machine, explaining why in SUPERBOY SPECTACULAR #1 Superboy did not remember his previous meetings with Wayne, or that in SUPERMAN (first series)#76, he had no knowledge of Wayne's dual identity.

(By the way, the SUPERBOY #182 story presents its own anachronisms; around this time, the editors attempted to make the Superboy stories more topical. The only trouble that presented itself with this approach had to with the stories being topical with regards to issues of the SEVENTIES, when these stories got published, and not the FIFTIES or SIXTIES, when these stories should have taken place. Hence, Higbee's Zodiac Killer hoax served as an homage to the real-life murderer the Zodiac Killer who committed his crimes in California in the 1970's. He had the notoriety for killing couples. Also, Wayne's identiy as the Executioner may have served as an homage to the Don Pendleton character, quite popular in the early 1970's-who also inspired the Punisher in the Spider-Man stories.)



gothcityfan
Member
posted August 27, 2002 05:56 PM

I notice some mention of Sherlock Holmes appearances on this topic. Not sure the details (sorry, not in mood to skim 20+ pages), but just wanted to mention I remember reading a cool Sherlock story in ECLIPSO, around issues #11-12 (it was a 2 part story I believe). Just wanted to mention it if it hasn't been already.



datalore
Member
posted September 03, 2002 11:11 AM

I think the ECLIPSO story was #7 and 8...



Xanadude
Member
posted October 09, 2002 07:14 PM

Any more info on the Super-Sons? I know there's a checklist, but were there any significant developments within their stories?



Green_Hornet
Member
posted October 12, 2002 03:58 PM

Mikishawm, I'm in awe of you brother. When you get around to it, could you do an actual history of Batwoman? I'm thinking of using her in a fan-fiction, are any of her appearances reprinted besides the ones in BATMAN IN THE FIFTIES and THE GREATEST JOKER STORIES EVER TOLD? Also could you do more of Gotham's recurring finest? I really enjoyed the ones on Bullock, O'Hara, and Shotgun Smith. Thanks man.



Mikishawm
Member
posted October 14, 2002 05:52 AM

Thanks, Hornet! I don't know if I'll ever be able to get back to the histories again but I can answer your reprint question. Your best bet is to find a copy of the hardback BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s, which includes an abundance of Batwoman stories. Here's a list of most of her major reprint appearances:

BATMAN:
# 105: "The Challenge of Batwoman" -- BATMAN FAMILY # 3; BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s
# 122: "The Marriage of Batman and Batwoman" -- BATMAN ANNUAL # 4; PIZZA HUT COLLECTORS' EDITION: BATMAN # 122
# 125: "The Secret Life of Bat-Hound" -- BATMAN ANNUAL # 7
# 126: "The Menace of the Firefly" -- BATMAN # 208
# 129: "The Web of the Spinner" -- BATMAN # 198; BATMAN FAMILY # 8
# 131: "The Second Batman and Robin Team" -- BATMAN ANNUAL # 7; BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s
# 139: "Bat-Girl" -- BATMAN ANNUAL # 7; BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s
# 144: "Bat-Mite Meets Bat-Girl" -- BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s; BATMAN IN THE SIXTIES
# 153: "Prisoners of Three Worlds" -- BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s
# 159: "The Great Clayface-Joker Feud" -- GREATEST JOKER STORIES EVER TOLD; STACKED DECK

DETECTIVE COMICS:
# 233: "The Batwoman" -- BATMAN # 208 (p. 5); BATMAN ANNUAL # 4; BATMAN FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s; BATMAN IN THE FIFTIES
# 249: "The Crime of Bruce Wayne" -- BATMAN # 233

WORLD’S FINEST COMICS:
# 90: "The Super-Batwoman" -- WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 161; WORLD'S FINEST COMICS ARCHIVES # 2



Green_Hornet
Member
posted October 19, 2002 10:11 PM

Thank you Mikishawm, I'll be looking for FROM THE 30s TO THE 70s on eBay. Just as a way to keep this great thread going I thought I'd ask, with your extensive knowledge of the Bat what's your favorite run on a Batman title? Anyone else is welcome to chip in their two cents.

Just to start off mine was Kelly Pucket and Mike Parobeck on BATMAN ADVENTURES, since that was what made me love Batman as a wee lad - .



n-man
Member
posted October 24, 2002 05:11 AM

Who taught the young Bruce? I found these persons:

BATMAN #431: Kirigi
BATMAN #434: Mark Jenner, Frederick Stone, Kinsley, La Salle, Peter Allison, Raphael Di Giorda, Hank Jones
BATMAN #435: Webber, Aurelius Boch, Mr. Shastri, Mr. Campbell, Mary Mc Ginnis
BATMAN #567: David Cain

DETECTIVE COMICS ANNUAL #2: Harvey Harris
DETECTIVE COMICS ANNUAL #3: Tsunemoto
DETECTIVE COMICS #599: Chu Chin Li, Henri Ducard

and also Lady Shiva Woo San

...any comments?



Two Face 22
Member
posted October 27, 2002 04:17 AM

n-man:

There was a thread a few weeks ago detailing Batman's trainers. I've 'bumped' it up today. It's called 'How many of Batman's trainers can you name?' or something similar. Hope this helps!

And Mikishawm, I'd second n-man's request for a list of any tutors you know of either on this thread or the one mentioned above. I think we've just about named all Post-Crisis trainers, but having trouble with Pre-Crisis.



Mikishawm
Member
posted October 27, 2002 06:50 PM

Thanks to Two Face 22's exhaustive list, there really isn't much to add other than the unnamed medical examiner from GOTHAM KNIGHTS # 1, the Rhana Bhutra from SUPERMAN: THE ODYSSEY and Alfred, who taught Bruce about acting. Also, in a development inspired by the animated series, Zatara was said to have trained Bruce Wayne, too (JLA: BLACK BAPTISM # 2).

I'd eliminate Mary McGinnis (who wasn't one of Batman's teachers; she was killed because the killer thought she could implicate him) and Lady Shiva (who worked with Batman later but not at the beginning of his career).

Here's the list of appearances:

BATMAN ANNUAL # 13: Alfred Pennyworth.

BATMAN CHRONICLES #6: Dan Mallory.

BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS #1: unnamed medical examiner.

BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS #29: Max Dodge.

BATMAN: LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT # 1: Willy Doggett.

BATMAN: LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT # 52: Shao-La.

JLA: BLACK BAPTISM # 2: John Zatara.

ROBIN # 31: Ted Grant.

SUPERMAN: THE ODYSSEY: The Rhana Bhutra.

*****

Pre-Crisis:

DETECTIVE COMICS # 226: Harvey Harris.

DETECTIVE COMICS # 227: Barrett Kean.

DETECTIVE COMICS # 244: Lee Collins.

UNTOLD LEGEND OF THE BATMAN # 1: Amos Rexford.

And, while it doesn't exactly involve a teacher, LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT # 95 contains a flashback to Bruce's battle with the Magician in Europe.


As for favorite runs, I'd certainly include the Puckett/Parobeck run on BATMAN ADVENTURES on my list. Ditto the Paul Dini/Ty Templeton/Rick Burchett run on BATMAN & ROBIN ADVENTURES (# 1-8) and -- my absolute favorite of the animated comics -- Ty Templeton's run as scripter (BATMAN & ROBIN ADVENTURES # 9-25; BATMAN: GOTHAM ADVENTURES # 1-12, 14). When it comes right down to it, the decade-long run of the animated Batman comics has set a standard of sustained excellence that few other series can boast.

Other fave runs: the Englehart/Rogers/Austin run on DETECTIVE COMICS (# 471-476) blew me away when I was a teenager and it still kills me today. Including the two Simonson-penciled issues (# 469-470), it managed to touch on every era and aspect of the Batman experience up to that point, making it all look cool and contemporary.

Chuck Dixon's long run on DETECTIVE COMICS (# 644-729) is overdue for reappraisal. Lots of strong, clever stories coupled with an expanded supporting cast and terrific characterization that balanced the typical grimness of the series with a bit of humor. Dixon's Batman possessed the sympathetic qualities of the Batman I grew up with in the 1970s. For my money, the Chuck Dixon-Graham Nolan stories are the equal of the Englehart-Rogers run … but aren't appreciated nearly as much. Unlike the classic runs that consisted of short bursts that quickly faded away, Dixon was there consistently for YEARS and that reliability made him easy to take for granted (just like the BATMAN ADVENTURES books).

From the 1960s, I'd choose Carmine Infantino's issues DETECTIVE (the odd-numbered issues from # 327 to 363, the two-part "Round-Robin Death Threats" (# 366-367, the pinnacle of his run) and "Batgirl Breaks Up the Dynamic Duo" (# 369). With scripts by John Broome and Gardner Fox, these issues breathed new life into Batman and were markedly superior to the stiff "Bob Kane" art (actually Sheldon Moldoff & Joe Giella) in BATMAN and the even-numbered issues of 'TEC. Other highlights in the Infantino era: "Mystery of the Menacing Mask" (# 327), "Castle With Wall-to-Wall Danger" (# 329), "Trail of the Talking Mask" (# 335), "The Strange Death of Batman" (# 347), a great Joker story (# 341) and the intros of Blockbuster (# 345, 349), Cluemaster (# 351) and Batgirl (# 359, 361).

There's a nice block of DETECTIVE from 1955 to 1956 (# 221-235) that's weighted heavily towards looking at the mystique and history of Batman. It starts with a story comprised of flashbacks about Batman and Robin's most amazing escapes (# 221) and continues with an elaborate con in which crooks claim that there are actually several Batmen taking turns at the role (# 222). The Silver Age Mad Hatter (# 230) and Batwoman (# 233) both debut. Two consecutive stories deal with men who taught Bruce Wayne some of his crime-fighting secrets (# 226, 227) while another flashes back to the beginning of Batman's career (# 231). And capping a stellar run is "The First Batman," in which Bruce Wayne learns that the deaths of his parents were a hit that was contracted by Lew Moxon. "Put on your costume, Dick -- we've just reopened the Wayne murder case!"

And from the 1940s, I'd nominate BATMAN # 1-7 (beginning with that stunning first issue and its Catwoman and Joker stories and ending with the GCPD's official recognition of the Dark Knight in "The People Vs. The Batman") and DETECTIVE # 66-80 (encompassing the original Two-Face trilogy, the origins of the Crime Doctor and Tweedledum & Tweedledee, the second Scarecrow story, a trio of Joker episodes, the near-exposure of Batman's secret identity, some trademark human interest pieces and more).



Mikishawm
Member
posted October 28, 2002 05:14 AM

I've guest-written -- partially, at least -- this week's Answer Man column, too. It's at this link:

http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/103585005565655.htm

And my two recent "Page-By-Page With The Power Company" annotations are at the links below:

http://dcboards.warnerbros.com/files/Forum25/HTML/000433.html

http://dcboards.warnerbros.com/files/Forum25/HTML/000467.html

Have a great day!

John



Two Face 22
Member
posted October 29, 2002 02:33 PM

Thanks John - that's excellent. Knew you could help!

One question though - what did the Rhana Bhutra teach Bruce - I don't have that comic unforunately.

Any chance of a request too? I've been researching Batmobiles over the past few months. Just wondered if you had any useful information to hand on this subject. i.e. different models, first appearances, etc. Anything would be help!

Thanks in anticipation.

All the very best,

Colin



Green_Hornet
Member
posted October 29, 2002 10:21 PM

Thanks Mikishawm,

Some interesting choices. I love all the ADVENTURES comics and am in the process of trying to track the ones I don't own down. I've read the Englehart-run in the Strange Apparitions trade and loved it. Sadly, I haven't read much of Dixon on Detective, but I enjoyed what I have read.

Even more sadly I've only read a handful of the 40's, 50's, and 60's comics mostly through GREATEST STORIES and the BATMAN FROM THE 30's TO THE 70's (I just got it and the Superman one and love both). Batman 1 is awesome. You just can't lose with Joker, the Cat, and Hugo Strange all in one comic. My only disagreement is 'TEC #235 (The First Batman). I hated that story and felt it ruined the Joe Chill story in BATMAN #47, which is for my money the best Batman origin story ever told.

"I became Batman because of what you did and I'd swore I'd arrest you for it some day! I can't prove your guilt, but I'll never stop hounding you until I do...Whatever you do, I'll be watching...Wherever you go I'll be watching...I'll always be watching...and someday you'll make a mistake...and I'll be there waiting!"

***
"You guys realize what we did?"

"Yeah...we plugged Chill before he told us Batman's real name!"



Mikishawm
Member
posted October 30, 2002 05:32 AM

Thanks, Hornet!

Two Face 22 --

["What did the Rhana Bhutra teach Bruce ?"]

In the story, Clark Kent arrives at the Rhana Bhutra's sanctuary in Bhutran just as Bruce is leaving and he's referred to as a former student. Based on what Clark learns, I'd say that Bruce learned about the philosophy of pacifism even if he didn't embrace it.

"The people of Bhutran are dedicated to inner and outer peace, not to violence," he tells Clark. "That is why the other American had to leave. This is not a home for warriors."

Regrettably, I don't have anything down on the Batmobiles (though I do have an appearance list for the Batmobiles in general, if you'd like to see that). In the meantime, though, here's the link to a site with a lot of excellent information:

http://www.geocities.com/spencerl984/

Hope you find it interesting.



Two Face 22
Member
posted October 30, 2002 02:56 PM

Thanks for the link John. I'll check it out!

And yes, I'd love to see that Batmobile appearance list. Any chance you could post it here?



Xanadude
Member
posted November 05, 2002 05:48 PM

Has Lucius Fox's son appeared since his initial appearances in the early 80s? Same question for Bruce's secretary Colleen (also from the early 80s), who appeared to have a crush on her boss....



Louie Aussie
Member
posted November 08, 2002 01:20 AM

Hi John

Would it be ok if you could tell me a bit about the various characters called Quakemaster and Earthquake. I believe there have been few versions of them.

I know Scarface once was Quakemaster during the earthquake storyline.

Also if poissible their appearances in the titles?

I know I ask too much but I'd be grateful if you could!



Mikishawm
Member
posted November 08, 2002 06:11 AM

Two Face --

Here are the Batmobile appearances.

BATMOBILE (Earth-Two):
All-Star Comics # 69
All-Star Squadron # 20, 24-25
All-Star Squadron Annual # 3
Batman # 5-6, 9-10, 12-17, 19-25, 28-30, 32-34, 37-44, 47-53, 55-56, 58, 60-66, 68-92, 95
The Brave and The Bold (1) # 166, 182, 197, 200
Detective Comics # 48-49, 60, 64, 71, 74, 76-77, 80-81, 83, 85, 87, 89, 92, 94-101, 104-105, 107-108, 112, 117-118, 122, 124, 126-128, 131, 137-138, 140-147, 149-150, 152, 156-166, 168-169, 171-180, 182-185, 188-190, 194-195, 196 (double), 197, 200-202, 204-206, 208-210, 212-220, 222-224
Justice League of America # 135, 137
Star Spangled Comics # 87, 89, 91, 95, 98, 102-105, 109, 114-115, 117, 121, 126-127, 129
Wonder Woman (1) # 282-283
World's Finest Comics # 2-3, 6, 8-9, 14-15, 17-19, 21-22, 24, 28-29, 31, 33, 35-36, 38-41, 44, 48, 54, 57-58, 60, 63, 65, 67-70

BATMOBILE (Earth-One):
Batman # 96, 98-101, 105-114, 119-121, 123, 125, 128-166, 168-175, 178-181, 183-184, 186, 188, 190-192, 194-197, 199-202, 203 (feature), 204, 206-207, 209-217, 220, 222, 226, 229-231, 234, 236, 239-241, 246-247, 251, 254, 255 (feature), 258, 267, 270, 272-276, 278-281, 285, 287-292, 294, 302-303, 305, 311-313, 315-317, 319, 323-324, 327-331, 336, 339-346, 351-353, 355, 358-360, 368, 371, 373, 382-385, 387-389, 392, 394, 397, 400
Batman (Kellogg's Pop Tarts giveaways): The Case of Batman II; The Joker's Happy Victims; The Man in the Iron Mask; The Penguin's Fowl Play
Batman and the Outsiders # 16
Batman Annual # 10
The Batman Family # 8, 17, 20
The Brave and The Bold (1) # 28, 64, 67-71, 74, 76, 78, 81, 106, 111, 131, 140, 148-149, 156, 160-161, 165, 168, 172, 178, 183, 188-189, 191
DC Comics Presents Annual # 2
DC Special # 28
DC Special Series # 15
Detective Comics # 225-229, 231-234, 236-245, 247, 249-251, 253, 255, 257-259, 261-263, 266-267, 271-272, 275, 277-287, 289-292, 294, 296, 298, 300-302, 304-305, 307-325, 328, 330-336, 338-347, 349-366, 368-384, 386-390, 393-394, 396, 399-400, 402, 407-409, 413, 417, 420, 433-436, 449, 453, 456, 469, 471, 474, 484, 486, 489, 493-495, 498-500, 503, 507, 509, 511, 513-514, 518-520, 523, 525-527, 529, 534, 542, 548, 551, 554-555, 560
The Flash (1) # 192
Justice League of America # 32, 40, 50, 52, 61, 68, 76, 154, 188
Metal Men (1) # 21
Super Friends # 3-6, 10, 14, 19, 22, 31-32, 40
Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane # 70
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen # 111
Teen Titans [1] # 3
The Untold Legend of The Batman # 1-3
Who's Who '85 # 2
World's Finest Comics # 72-73, 76-78, 80-81, 85, 88-91, 93-95, 98-99, 101-103, 105, 110, 112-122, 124-130, 135, 137, 139-140, 142, 144, 146-147, 155-156, 159-160, 163-165, 168-169, 171, 173, 177, 181, 189-191, 239, 257, 261-262, 266, 268, 270, 279, 286-287, 290-291, 294, 296, 303, 322-323

BATMOBILE (Earth-85):
Batman: Bride of the Demon
Batman: Full Circle
Secret Origins (3) # 39

BATMOBILE (current):
Action Comics # 719, 753
Adventures of Superman # 567
Azrael # 1-2, 10-11, 30, 36, 39
Azrael: Agent of the Bat # 91
Aztek: The Ultimate Man # 7
Batgirl # 14
Batman # 401-403, 408-412, 414-416, 418, 424-426, 432, 437-442, 444, 448-449, 451-467, 469-471, 474, 479-484, 486-487, 490-494, 496-497, 499, 501, 503, 505-508, 510-511, 0, 513-514, 516-517, 521, 523, 525-527, 535, 540, 542-543, 545, 547, 550, 555, 575-578, 580, 583, 587-589, 596-598, 600-603, 605
Batman/Aliens # 2
Batman & Superman: World's Finest # 1, 3, 7
Batman Annual # 11, 13, 17
Batman: Bane
Batman: Black and White # 3-4
Batman: Blackgate # 1
The Batman Chronicles # 2, 7, 10, 16, 23
Batman Chronicles: The Gauntlet
Batman/Deadman: Death and Glory
Batman/Demon
Batman: DOA
Batman: Dreamland
Batman 80-Page Giant # 1-2
Batman: Fortunate Son
Batman: Gotham Knights # 4, 7, 15-18, 22, 24-25, 28-30, 32-34
Batman: Gotham Nights II # 2
Batman/Green Arrow: The Poison Tomorrow
Batman/Grendel: Devil's Bones # 1
Batman/Grendel: Devil's Dance # 2
Batman/Grendel: Devil's Riddle # 1
Batman/Grendel: Devil's Masque # 2
Batman: Joker's Apprentice # 1
Batman/Judge Dredd: Die Laughing # 2
Batman/Judge Dredd: Vendetta In Gotham
Batman: Knightgallery (text)
Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight # 38, 41-42, 46-48, 51-52, 63, 65, 67, 79-81, 83-84, 87, 93, 95, 107, 130, 134, 140, 147, 149, 154-155, 157-158
Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Annual # 5
Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Halloween Special # 1
Batman: Madness (A Legends of the Dark Knight Halloween Special) # 1
Batman: Mr. Freeze
Batman: Orpheus Rising # 2-3, 5
Batman: Our Worlds At War # 1
Batman: Outlaws # 1
Batman Plus # 1
Batman/Predator III # 1
Batman: Run, Riddler, Run # 2
Batman/Scarecrow 3-D # 1
Batman Secret Files # 1
Batman: Shadow of The Bat # 2, 5-7, 10-12, 15-18, 24, 28, 31, 0, 32-33, 35, 37-40, 42-43, 47-48, 51, 53, 55-57, 61-64, 66-67, 69, 73, 79
Batman: Shadow of The Bat Annual # 1, 5
Batman: The Abduction
Batman: The Book of Shadows
Batman: The Cult # 4
Batman: The Hill # 1
Batman: The Killing Joke
Batman: The Long Halloween # 4
Batman: The 10-Cent Adventure # 1
Batman 3-D
Batman: Toyman # 2
Batman: Turning Points # 3
Batman: Two-Face -- Crime and Punishment
Batman: Two-Face Strikes Twice # 1
Batman Vs. Predator # 1-3
Batman Versus Predator II: Bloodmatch # 1-2, 4
Batman/Wildcat # 1-2
Birds of Prey: Manhunt # 2
Catwoman (2) # 2, 26, 38-40
Chain Gang War # 12
Challengers of the Unknown (3) # 11
Christmas With the Super-Heroes # 2
DC Universe Holiday Bash # 1, 3
Deathstroke, the Terminator # 7, 9
The Demon (3) # 3-4, 8, 24
Detective Comics # 584, 589, 591-593, 595-597, 600-605, 608, 611, 613-616, 619-620, 625-630, 635-636, 642, 644, 646-647, 649-656, 658-659, 661, 663, 668, 676, 678, 0, 679-680, 683, 686, 688-689, 693-694, 696, 703-707, 709, 713-715, 717-718, 725, M, 742, 744-745, 750, 757, 759, 761, 764, 770, 773-774
Detective Comics Annual # 5-6, 10
Gotham Nights # 3
JLA # 5, 22, 50
JLA/Titans # 1
The Joker: Devil's Advocate
Justice League Annual # 2
Justice Leagues: JLA # 1
Legends # 2
Legends of the Dark Knight # 11, 13, 15, 27, 30-31
Legends of the Dark Knight Annual # 2
Legends of the World's Finest # 1-2
Legion of Super-Heroes (4) # 74
The Man of Steel # 3
Marvel Versus DC/DC Versus Marvel # 2
The New Teen Titans (2) # 18
Nightwing (2) # 13-15
Resurrection Man # 7
Robin (2) # 7-8, 11-13, 17, 23-24, 28, 31, 45, 58, 87, 92, 100, 106
Robin Annual # 4
Robin II # 2
Robin: Year One # 1-4
Scarecrow (Villains) # 1
Secret Origins (3) # 39
Secret Origins Special # 1
Showcase '93 # 10
Silver Age # 1
Sins of Youth: Batboy and Robin # 1
Sins of Youth: Kid Flash/Impulse # 1
Sovereign Seven # 5
The Spectre (4) # 3
Starman (2) # 33, 35
Suicide Squad # 40
Superman: Secret Files # 1
Superman: The Man of Steel # 21
Swamp Thing (2) # 53
Swamp Thing Annual # 4
Underworld Unleashed # 2
Underworld Unleashed: Batman - Devil's Asylum # 1
Unlimited Access # 2
Who's Who '90 # 5
World's Finest # 1, 3
World’s Finest: Our Worlds At War # 1
Young Justice: Sins of Youth # 2
Zero Hour: Crisis In Time # 4

BATMOBILE (subway version):
Batman # 506, 513 (behind the scenes), 555
The Batman Chronicles # 2
Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight # 62
Batman/Predator III # 2, 4
Batman Secret Files # 1
Detective Comics # 667, 669, 671, 674-676, 679, 681, 690, 706
Robin (2) # 7
Total Justice # 1


Xanadude & Louie --

I'll be back tonight. Stay tuned!

John



Mikishawm
Member
posted November 08, 2002 09:59 PM

As promised ...


Xanadude --

Bruce’s longtime secretary Gwen Atkins was abruptly replaced by Caroline Crown in 1980’s BATMAN # 323 and, yeah, Caroline did think her new boss was pretty good looking. Len only used her in two more stories (BATMAN # 326 and UNTOLD LEGEND OF THE BATMAN # 3) before handing the series off to old pal Marv Wolfman. Marv revealed that Caroline had been placed in Bruce’s office as an industrial spy for millionaire Gregorian Falstaff. It was far from a willing role on Caroline’s part, though. Falstaff had been holding her daughter Elizabeth hostage. Batman, of course, rescued Caroline’s daughter (BATMAN # 330-332) but Caroline only made two more appearances (DETECTIVE # 500, 501) before vanishing into comics limbo.

Tim Fox was Lucius’ college-age son, who’d appeared in two of Len’s issues, BATMAN # 313 and 323. Upset by his dad’s objection to some of his friends, Tim moved out and, in Marv’s run, turned out to be part of a gang who believed that Bruce Wayne was involved in criminal practices. Lucius ended up being beaten and hospitalized by part of the gang (BATMAN # 330) and Tim belatedly learned that the charges against Bruce Wayne had been a fraud conceived by Gregorian Falstaff (# 333). Tim went back to college, earning his degree and later working as his father’s aide (behind the scenes) in BATMAN: NO MAN'S LAND # 0 to deal with some of Bruce's specific business requests. [The issue didn’t refer to Tim by name but he must certainly be the son mentioned in that issue.]

Tiffany Fox was Lucius’ oldest child and worked at the Wayne Foundation-sponsored drug rehab clinic. She made only three appearances during Len’s run (BATMAN # 308, 313 and 314) and never appeared again.

In current continuity, Lucius also has a wife (first seen in BATMAN # 443; generally referred to as Tanya though one story called her Nancy) and two other kids, a high school-age daughter (first seen in DETECTIVE # 658) and a younger son (BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS # 32). During Len’s run, I always thought that Lucius was widowed but it’s not clear if that was actually the case or not. Maybe Tanya was working at a job of her own during that time … or maybe Lucius remarried and Tanya is his second wife.


Louie --

The original Quake-Master was one of Robby Reed’s many one-shot alter egos, this one from 1966’s HOUSE OF MYSTERY # 158. Q-M could emit waves of force from his feet (enabling him to fly) and hands (sending out enough force to knock bad guys off their feet). His costume consisted of rings of color (green, light green and yellow) that evoked the concentric waves of power that he generated.

The second Quakemaster made his debut in early 1977’s DC SPECIAL # 28 (scripted by Bob Rozakis). He wore a green costume with a purple hood and leggings and wielded a jackhammer that gave off earthquake-level vibrations. With a bit of investigation, Batman discovered he was Robert Coleman, "a builder who was discredited when an apartment complex he put up fell apart in a bad hurricane. [Coleman was] out to prove none of his competitors’ buildings [were] any better." Unfortunately for the Quakemaster, his competitors’ structures were made of tougher stuff than his own buildings.

In the course of the adventure, the original Batcave suffered pretty severe damage in one of the quakes. Since he was living in mid-town Gotham at the time rather than the suburbs, Batman took advantage of the situation and relocated most of the Batcave’s contents to a newly-built Batcave beneath the Wayne Foundation Building (revealed two weeks later in DETECTIVE COMICS # 470).

Bob Rozakis used the Quakemaster two more times in 1978, albeit in extremely obscure locations. Quakemaster was one of the members of the Secret Society of Super-Villains who was supposed to capture the Freedom Fighters in 1978 (as revealed at the end of SSOSV # 15) but the book was cancelled before it could be published. Released only in CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE # 2, issue # 16 of SSOSV would have included the Quakemaster and Killer Moth’s attack on the Ray. Meanwhile, the Quakemaster also took on Wonder Woman at a Coast City football game on Thanksgiving of 1978 (part of Rozakis’ 1978 CALENDAR OF SUPER-SPECTACULAR DISASTERS). Bob used the villain for the last time in 1989 when Quakemaster attacked Hero Hotline at the behest of the Calculator (HERO HOTLINE # 1). He eventually ended up down on his luck in the super-villain bar known as the Dark Side (JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA # 44).

The third Quakemaster was a pretender but the GCPD didn’t know that when he broke into the airwaves and took credit for Gotham’s massive earthquake. He demanded one hundred million dollars or he’d "burn what’s left of Gotham to the ground" (1998’s BATMAN: SHADOW OF THE BAT # 74). He was visible on TV only as a shadowy, bulky figure who was bad and wore square-ish glasses (NIGHTWING # 20). Batman soon deduced that Quakemaster was a fraud who was using technical information given to him by a kidnapped seismologist named Jolene Relazzo (BATMAN # 554). Batman and his extended family quickly homed in Quakemaster (DETECTIVE # 721) and he was finally exposed in ROBIN # 53. It turns out he was Arnold Wesker a.k.a. the Ventriloquist. The Quakemaster who’d terrorized Gotham was nothing more than a life-size head and shoulders on Wesker’s right arm.



Jack Benny
Member
posted November 09, 2002 02:47 AM

Mr. Wells do you have any opinion about the BIRDS OF PREY tv series?

I haven't seen it because we don't have a WB network in the area.

I did get a bootleg of the pilot off eBay. Based on that one epsiode. Very average and not that exciting.



Green_Hornet
Member
posted November 09, 2002 11:36 PM

This is a shameless bump for someone on another thread who wanted to know about Gotham's mayors. On a related note Miki, do you have any info on Gotham's D.A.'s other then Harvey Dent and Janice Porter? And do you know the police commissioner(s) who came after Loeb and before Gordon? If the DA thing is to much trouble, don't worry about it.



Eduardo
Member
posted November 10, 2002 08:13 AM

Originally posted by Green_Hornet:


And do you know the police commissioner(s) who came after Loeb and before Gordon?

That was Grogan. He was mentioned in the last page of YEAR ONE and has a one or two panels appearence in the CATWOMAN YEAR ONE ANNUAL. I don't think he appeared anywhere else.



Mikishawm
Member
posted November 11, 2002 08:15 PM

Thanks, Eduardo! Yep, the interim Commissioner was Peter Grogan.

As for the D.A.s:

The first Gotham D.A. depicted in a Batman story was a man named Carter who was murdered in DETECTIVE COMICS # 45. BATMAN # 11 recounted the story of Lee Benson’s election to office and he also appeared in # 12. At almost the same time, though, Harvey Kent was described as Gotham’s D.A. (DETECTIVE # 66). In any event, his transformation into Two-Face cut his law career short.

According to ROBIN # 0, Harvey Dent murdered his immediate successor Aldrich Meany. The account in ROBIN: YEAR ONE # 2, though, says that the victim was Judge Lawrence Watkins.

In any event, there were various one-shot D.A.s who appeared on occasion throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Sometime after the appearance of a district attorney named Barnes (DETECTIVE # 306), D.A. John Danton made his debut as a member of the Mystery Analysts of Gotham City (BATMAN # 164). He made a total of ten appearances in the 1960s, the last of them in JIMMY OLSEN # 111 and LOIS LANE # 99. Danton appeared in his post-D.A. capacity in BATMAN # 295.

Danton’s successor was David Stevens, one-time assistant to Harvey Dent and, presumably, the D.A. glimpsed in BRAVE & BOLD # 116 and 145. Stevens had actually married Harvey’s ex-wife Gilda and Harvey had accepted that, acknowledging that his former mate was happy. When Stevens was murdered, Harvey tracked down the killer and took his life (BATMAN # 328-329).

In current continuity, Gotham’s D.A.s have included Dick Jaynes (who was introduced and ultimately killed in THE DEMON [third series] # 2-5, 8), Armand Krol and Marion Grange (both of whom served as D.A. before becoming Gotham’s mayor) and current D.A. Willis (from DETECTIVE # 742 [behind the scenes], 743, 767 [behind the scenes]; BATMAN # 599, 600 [behind the scenes], 606 [behind the scenes]; BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS # 25).

Outside mainstream continuity, we’ve had folks like Janet Van Dorn (from the Animated Series) and Janice Porter (from DARK VICTORY).

I didn't have time for an in-depth treatment but those are the basics.

And the BOP TV show ? Well, it's not MY Birds of Prey, by any means. This is The Huntress Show, guest-starring Oracle. And I can't get used to a teenaged Dinah. (Sure was cool seeing the sonic cry in action on last week's episode, though.)

But setting all my prejudices aside, I'll admit to kind of enjoying the show and the cast. It's no SMALLVILLE but I don't feel like I've wasted my time after watching an episode. I wish Harleen Quinzell was getting more screen time, though.



acg2001
New Member
posted November 14, 2002 10:28 AM

I think that it would have been better to stick to the original Birds Of Prey concept. Nevertheless, like Mikishawm said, the TV series is not bad. When did Black Canary get psychic powers though?



Louie Aussie
Member
posted November 15, 2002 10:53 PM

Thanks John.

Thought I'd bump this thread with another request: (Hope this is ok John.)

I'd like some info on the various incarnations of Star Sapphire.



XmurderXmadeXeasyX
New Member
posted November 22, 2002 08:03 AM

Wow........ok, I'm new to the boards. And I just read this whole thread....well, over the last two days, anyhow.

Mikishawm, I bow and genuflect to your superior knowledge.

I loved the bio's on Calendar Man (I used to own 'TEC #551), ans especially Mr. Zsasz, whom I had been wondering about his origin for awhile, him being one of my favorites.

Sooo anyway, I have a few nosy questions of my own...

I noticed in his thread you cited the Riddler as one of your favorite villians, mine too, my #1 actually. But I'm surprised to see you say he's not crazy. I always felt one of the neatest aspects of him, is that he WAS actually crazy but in such a specific and peculiar way...being literally obsessed with out-witting the Batman, and the law enforcment in general. The fact that he derives such pleasure from his mind games it drives him to crime, and that he cannot commit a crime without challenging someone to catch him. Remember in Knightfall his own gang ousted him, because he was literally unable to pull the heist they planned without sending out a riddle first. I think that he actually doesn't have control over that, and can't choose to do otherwise. It's debatable of course, but in my eyes that has always colored him as criminally insane to me.

Anyway, I know a bio on him would be way too much, but could you maybe give us a short synopsis of his origin and his first few forays into crime? All that I know is that he was obsessed with puzzles as a kid, he used to cheat in school, and his real name is either Eddie Nashton or Edward Nygma.

I also saw you mentioned his henchwomen, Quiz and Query, but I also know little about them....is there anything to the origins of any of his assistants?

And speaking of origins, I've always been a bit confused about the Joker's. I've seen it told several different ways, the one sticking out in my mind has him quitting his job as a chemist to become a comedian, unsuccessfully. So he turns to crime, his wife is electrocuted before a job, reluctantly he goes anyway, falls into the acid, etc, etc......is there any one definite Joker origin?

I was also wondering what your favorite Bat-story-arc might be. I'm thinking more like small 3 to 7 parts arcs, not long sagas like Knightfall or anything. Mine would be 'Dark Knight/Dark City'...the Riddler is written soooo well in that one. I also really loved him in the 'Run, Riddler, Run' series. Even though it had terrible art, I the way the handled him, talking to everyone in riddles, almost refusing to have a normal conversation.

I don't know if anyone else here agrees wih me, but I've felt that sometimes the Riddler is written to much like the Joker, all spastic and bouncing off the walls (I'm sure Frank Gorshin's TV series interpretation of the character didn't help...), I think he's much more effctive when composed and reserved, smug and egotistical. (Jim Carrey butchered him in the movies too, the role would have been much better handled by Robin Williams) And the problem goes vice versa, I've seen the Joker and Penguin give Batman riddles as challenges to catching them, and it just makes a great villain like the Riddler seem generic. Opinions? Does anyone agree with me or am I just looking foolish?

And if I may have the honor of adding to the pile of requested bios, I'd like to see:
Anarky
Lady Shiva
Corrosive Man
Firefly (I don't know how many there were, I'm thinking of the one who appears in Knightfall, I remember Bats thinking 'He's been locked up in Arkham so long I almost forgot about him....')

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!



XmurderXmadeXeasyX
New Member
posted November 22, 2002 10:01 AM

Ooops, I forgot to add:
Film Freak
Abattoir
Cornelius Stirk



MrMGL
Member
posted November 24, 2002 10:14 AM

Thanks for listing Batman's trainers/teachers. Do you think you could do two more things with that list?

Could you mention what each trainer/teacher taught Bruce?

Could you put the list in chronological order of when they taught Bruce? For example, I think Harvey Harris taught Bruce when he was still a teenager and still living in Gotham, while most of the others taught Bruce when he was traveling around the world (18 to 25)

Did Alfred teach him acting before he traveled around the world or when he returned to Gotham?

Could Leslie Thompkins be considered one of his teachers as well?



MrMGL
Member
posted November 24, 2002 11:39 AM

Here's a very preliminary draft of a timeline featuring Batman, his trainers/teachers, & other folks who've been trained by Batman's trainers. Please help me out with any corrections and/or additions. I could use help getting his various teachers in the right chronological order. Thanks!


37 YEARS AGO

Bruce Wayne born. [BATMAN #0, 10/94]

33 YEARS AGO

Bruce (4) falls into deep cavern below Wayne Manor filled with bats, rescued by father. [BATMAN #0, 10/94]

Sometime later, Alfred Pennyworth becomes Waynes' butler, meeting Bruce for 1st time. [BATMAN #0, 10/94]

32 YEARS AGO

Zatanna born to Zatara & Sindella. 6 months later, Sindella seemingly dies in car crash. [JLA #164, 3/79; DCU HEROES SF&O #1, 2/99]

Boxer Ted Grant retires as undefeated world heavyweight champion. [DCU HEROES SF&O #1, 2/99]

29 YEARS AGO

Q Group asks Thomas Wayne to join them, he refuses. [AZTEK #7, 2/97]

Mob boss Vincent Falcone brings son Carmine, who had been shot, to Dr. Wayne, who saves Carmine's life. Bruce watches. [BATMAN: LONG HALLOWEEN]

Leslie Thompkins (23) graduates from medical school. [NO MAN'S LAND SF&O #1, 12/99]

Few months later, Bruce's parents gunned down by mugger Joe Chill in Gotham City. Street becomes known as Crime Alley. [BATMAN #0, 10/94; BATMAN SF&O #1, 10/97]

Leslie finds Bruce (8) sitting near bodies of his murdered parents. Leslie cares for Bruce until he is able to return home to Alfred & uncle Philip. [NO MAN'S LAND SF&O #1, 12/99]

Carmine "Roman" Falcone now head of mob, attends Thomas & Martha's funeral, tells young Bruce he owes him favor. [BATMAN: DARK VICTORY]

Bruce manipulates Child Services paperwork & is lost in their bureaucracy. [BATMAN #0, 10/94]

Selina Kyle born. [CATWOMAN SF&O #1, 11/02] Selina always believed Carmine "The Roman" Falcone was her real father. [BATMAN: DARK VICTORY] Selina had younger sister Maggie. [CATWOMAN SF&O #1, 11/02] When Selina was very young her mother committed suicide. She was raised by her alcoholic father. [CATWOMAN #0, 10/94]

27 YEARS AGO

Rita Muldoon born to "Iron" Mike Muldoon, Wildcat I's old trainer. [GG: WARRIOR ANN #1, '95]

Yolanda Montez born to Maria & Juan "Mauler" Montez. Yolanda becomes goddaughter to Ted (Wildcat) Grant. [INF INC #26, 5/86]


continued------



MrMGL
Member
posted November 24, 2002 11:41 AM

26 YEARS AGO

Dick Grayson born to circus acrobats John & Mary Grayson, known as "Flying Grayson". [NTT #37, 12/83]

23 YEARS AGO

Bruce Wayne (14) leaves Gotham, auditing college courses in European universities such as Cambridge, Sorbonne, Berlin School of Science. [BATMAN #404, 2/87; SHADOW OF BAT #0, 10/94]

20 YEARS AGO

Using alias Frank Dixon, Bruce Wayne (17) learns detective skills from detective Harvey Harris in Birmingham. Harris killed on case involving white supremacists. Before dying, Harris tells Bruce he knows who he really is. [DETECTIVE ANN #2, '89]

18 YEARS AGO

Tim Drake born. [BATMAN #441, '89]

17 YEARS AGO

Bruce Wayne (20) scores perfect on every FBI test except for gun handling. He spends 6 weeks in office job before quitting. [SHADOW OF BAT #0, 10/94]

For next few years, Bruce travels around world, seeking training in martial arts & manhunting, learning all skills he will need to one day become crimefighter. [BATMAN #404, 2/87] Frenchman Henri Ducard made him apprentice in manhunting. [DETECTIVE #599; BATMAN: ULTIMATE GUIDE TO DARK KNIGHT] He trains in karate by Master Kirigi in Korea [BATMAN #431; SHADOW OF BAT #0, 10/94], learns savate from convicted killer in Borneo, learns judo & ju-jitsu in Japan, learns secret of Tao from old woman in China, in Africa learns how to read environment for signs of man's passage, learned secrets from ninjas in Japan. [SHADOW OF BAT #0, 10/94] Assassin named David Cain briefly trains Bruce Wayne in martial arts, until Bruce's vow never to kill clashed with Cain's lethal methods. [BATMAN #567, 7/99; NO MAN'S LAND SF&O #1, 12/99] Bruce seeks Rhana Bhutra, spiritual leader of Bhutran. [SUP:ODYSSEY, 7/99]

In Paris, Clark Kent meets Terri Chung, daughter of Rhana Bhutra. Terri takes Clark to Rhana Bhutra's temple where they pass Bruce Wayne as he is leaving. [SUP:ODYSSEY, 7/99]

Bruce is trained in boxing & other forms of fighting by Ted Grant (Wildcat I) [ROBIN #31], who will later train Dinah Lance II (Black Canary II) [SECRET ORIGINS], Selina Kyle (Catwoman) [SECRET ORIGINS], Yolanda Montez (Wildcat II) [SECRET ORIGINS], Dick Grayson (Robin I/Nightwing), Rita Muldoon [GG: WARRIOR ANN #1, '95], Charlie Bullock & others.

16 YEARS AGO

Assassin David Cain raises young girl from birth to become his assistant & successor. He names her Cassandra, but does not teach her to speak. [BATMAN #567, 7/99; NO MAN'S LAND SF&O #1, 12/99]

Selina Kyle (13) escapes from Juvenile Hall, lives on streets, becomes cat burglar. [CATWOMAN #0, 10/94; CATWOMAN SF&O #1, 11/02]

Sometime after, she trains with Ted Grant, meeting Dinah Lance & Yolanda Montez. [SECRET ORIGINS]

13 YEARS AGO

Bruce Wayne becomes master escape artist under Zatara's tutelage, meets young Zatanna. [JLA: BLACK BAPTISM #2] (it would have to be before Allura places curse on Zatara & Zatanna)

Evil elemental Allura places curse on Zatara & his daughter Zatanna that would kill them both if they ever saw each other again. Zatara left Earth to search for good counterpart of Allura in order to reverse curse. Zatanna (18) became stage magician, wearing costume like her father's while also searching for her father. [WhWh #26, 4/87]

Bruce Wayne heads back to Gotham City after completing his training with various instructors over past several years: Kirig [BATMAN #431], Mark Jenner, Frederick Stone, Kinsley, La Salle, Peter Allison, Raphael Di Giorda, Hank Jones [BATMAN #434], Webber, Aurelius Boch, Mr. Shastri, Mr. Campbell, Mary McGinnis [BATMAN #435], Cain [BATMAN #567], Harvey Harris [DETECTIVE ANN #2, '89], Tsunemoto [DETECTIVE ANN #3, '90], Chu Chun Li, Henri Ducard [DETECTIVE #599], Rhana Butra [SUPERMAN:ODYSSEY], Zatara [JLA: BLACK BAPTISM #2], unnamed medical examiner [BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS #1], Dan Mallory [BATMAN CHRONICLES #6], Max Dodge [BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS #29], Willy Doggett [BATMAN: LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT #1], Shao La [BATMAN: LOTDK #52], Ted Grant (Wildcat) [ROBIN #31]


continued---------



MrMGL
Member
posted November 24, 2002 11:44 AM

12 YEARS AGO

Bruce Wayne (25) returns to Gotham after 12 years away, meets Jim Gordon & Harvey Dent. [BATMAN #404, 2/87]

Superman makes his debut in Metropolis. [MOS #1,7/86]

3 months after returning to Gotham, Bruce encounters Selina Kyle (17) while in disguise. After bat flies through his window, Bruce gets idea for new identity. [BATMAN #404, 2/87]

Bruce creates identity of Batman, with Alfred's help, begins war on crime. [BATMAN #405, 3/87; BATMAN SF&O #1, 10/97]

Bruce hires Lucius Fox to run WayneCorp, gets out of defense work, keeps huge amount of technology to use as part of Batman's arsenal. Bruce & Alfred set up Batcave below Wayne Manor, construct Batmobile, set up Batman's arsenal & utility belt. [DETECTIVE #0, 10/94]

Inspired by Batman, Selina Kyle becomes master thief Catwoman. [BATMAN #406, 4/87; CATWOMAN #0, 10/94; BATMAN VILLAIN SF&O #1, 10/99]

Gordon & wife meet Bruce at Wayne Manor. [BATMAN #407, 5/87]

Batman vs small-time crook Red Hood, who falls into vat of chemicals which bleach his skin chalk white, color his hair green & leave his lips ruby red leer. Driven insane, he becomes Joker, Clown Prince of Crime, most feared villain Gotham City has ever known & Batman's arch-nemesis. [BATMAN VILLAINS SF&O #1, 10/99]

Catwoman commits series of cat-burglaries. Batman encounters Catwoman at Roman's mansion. Gordon hears police report about Joker's first crime spree. [BATMAN #407, 5/87]

Soon after, Batman has 1st encounter with Joker.

Batman meets Julie Madison, has first encounters with Clayface I, Hugo Strange, Scarecrow, Riddler, Calendar Man, Poison Ivy, Man-Bat, Clayface II, & meets Vicki Vale.

JLA formed.

Batman meets GL Alan Scott who officially comes out of retirement. [GOTHAM KNIGHTS #10, 12/00]

With her stolen loot, Selina Kyle is able to fashion a new life in Gotham City, moving into high society. [CATWOMAN #0, 10/94]

"Batman: Long Halloween" storyline.



Mikishawm
Member
posted November 30, 2002 03:22 PM

I’m not sure what happened here but I’m glad to see the thread’s still alive. With the holidays approaching, I figure this will be the last time I’ll be able to answer questions in any kind of detail before at least the end of the year. Consider this a Going-Out-With-A-Bang edition.


Louie --

STAR SAPPHIRE I, wearing a sapphire in her tiara and stylishly clad in a purple costume and fishnet stockings, attacked Earth in 1947, intent on using a device of unknown origin to drain the chlorophyll from Earth’s atmosphere and, thus, kill everyone on the planet by destroying their oxygen supply. Convinced that the Flash and scientist Maria Flura were the only opposition to her plan, the purple-haired queen used an eye-like Space-Time Machine to transport them to her gem-like sapphire planet -- which had moved into Earth’s orbit. The Flash thwarted her on this occasion (ALL-FLASH # 32) and again in 1948 (COMIC CAVALCADE # 29) but her motivation for wanting to destroy Earth in the first place was never explained.

Years later, a race of extraterrestrial female warriors called the Zamarons arrived on Earth in search of a successor for their recently deceased queen, a woman must be her exact double. That turned out to be industrialist Carol Ferris, who refused the honor because of her love for Green Lantern. The Zamarons, hoping to demonstrate that the hero was unworthy of her, transformed Carol into STAR SAPPHIRE II, a super-being wearing a dark pink costume and empowered by the sapphire in her tiara. GL defeated Star Sapphire and the Zamarons decided that, if a man could defeat her, she really wasn’t queen material. Carol’s memory of the entire escapade was erased (GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 16).

The Zamarons left the sapphire behind, though, hoping that Carol would be tempted to use it again. She did but was defeated by GL a second time, arguably more humiliating than the first because now he knew that Carol Ferris was Star Sapphire and -- with her memories automatically erased -- she didn’t (GL # 26). In time, GL realized he’d made a mistake and, after a later encounter with Star Sapphire, he told Carol the truth about her alternate personality (GL # 73, 74).

The Zamarons went on to select Dela Pharon of the planet Xanador as their new queen and she, for our purposes, was STAR SAPPHIRE III. A faction of Zamarons constantly viewed Dela with disdain, sniffing that Carol Ferris would have made a superior queen. Frustrated at the comments, Dela flew to Earth to fight Carol, convinced that a resounding defeat of her rival would silence her critics. For what it’s worth, Dela did defeat Carol -- but Green Lantern, in turn, defeated her (GL # 41). The Zamarons, presumably, were in the market for another queen.

On the medieval world of Pandina, the Zamarons offered Remoni-Notra a star sapphire and tempted her with the possibility of becoming their queen. As one of five candidates for the throne, Remoni-Notra took it upon herself to eliminate the competition and traveled through outer space to a succession of worlds. STAR SAPPHIRE IV arrived on Earth to steal the sapphire from that world’s gem-bearer. Unfortunately, Carol Ferris had no conscious or unconscious memories of the location of her gem (from the unpublished script for SECRET SOCIETY OF SUPER-VILLAINS # 17, later summarized by Bob Rozakis in the letter column of 1979’s JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA # 174 and his online Silver Bullets Comics column).

Taking residence in San Francisco, Remoni-Notra became the new Star Sapphire and assumed two civilian identities, those of a French travel agent named Camille (SSOSV # 7) and a fast-talking young woman named Debbie Darnell (SSOSV # 6, 9, 11). Hoping that the Secret Society’s resources would be of help in finding Carol’s gem, the new Star Sapphire joined the villains (SSOSV # 1-15). Instead, she ended up being chased into limbo (JLA # 166) in the same time frame that Carol’s memories of her own sapphire were revived (DC COMICS PRESENTS # 6 and pages 14 & 15 of GREEN LANTERN # 192). Remoni-Notra would never see the gem, however. After briefly inhabiting the body of Zatanna and nearly gaining access to the extraterrestrial Nova Jewels, Star Sapphire was captured alongside her Society cohorts and imprisoned (JLA # 168). She was never seen again.

Meanwhile, Carol’s evil alter was revived as a pawn of the original Star Sapphire. She’d been one of the Zamarons’ earlier queens but, upon learning that she feared men, the alien warriors stripped her of her sapphire and exiled her to the unpopulated gem-world where the Flash had met her in 1947. In the end, Carol’s incarnation of Star Sapphire proved the better and she trapped her predecessor in her power-sapphire (retroactively revealed in FLASH & GREEN LANTERN: THE BRAVE & THE BOLD # 6).

The Zamarons had eventually settled on a queen but, by GL # 192, she was dying. The issue’s fascinating, complex recounting of Star Sapphire’s history revealed the bizarre detail that Carol had used the sapphire to purge herself of her aggressive side -- which manifested itself as the male being known as the Predator. They merged at the end of # 191 and a newer, nastier Star Sapphire emerged. By the end of # 192, the Zamarons’ queen had died and Carol was installed as their new ruler.

This time, Carol’s Star Sapphire persona remained intact for months (years, in real time), during which she learned that the Zamarons were the female counterparts of the planet Oa’s Guardians of the Universe. When the men and women of Oa reunited and decided to spend some quality time in another dimension, Star Sapphire was left as a queen with no subjects (GL # 200). She expanded her attacks to include the entire Green Lantern Corps and adopted a variation on her costume, one that had echoes of that other split-personality bad guy, Doctor Polaris (GL CORPS # 211-213). She killed Green Lantern Katma Tui (ACTION COMICS # 601) and generally made life miserable for Hal Jordan (# 602-605). But Hal persevered and eventually purged her dark side (GL [current] # 22-24).

In 1992’s GL ANNUAL # 1, Star Sapphire returned briefly thanks to the influence of Eclipso. And GL [current] # 41-42 came up with a supremely weird tale that claimed the Predator was an ancient entity who’d impregnated Star Sapphire with a demonic entity. That sub-plot was resolved in EXTREME JUSTICE # 10-11, wherein, with the meddling of the devilish Neron, Carol and the pregnant Sapphire were split into separate entities. At the end of the story, the Star Sapphire and Predator entities were zapped into nothingness by Neron, who their baby away in his arms. And that -- UGH! -- was that.

The epilogue was written in GL [current] # 119. Hal -- as the Spectre -- met Carol and revealed that Star Sapphire still existed in her, albeit only as a symbol of her life’s "regrets and failures." Handing Carol a representation the power-sapphire, Hal explained that she could get on with her life if she personally destroyed the gem she held. Carol complied and, though she had no conscious memory of the encounter, she knew that she was "going to be okay."

Oh, and there was a STAR SAPPHIRE V. She appeared in JUST IMAGINE STAN LEE ... SECRET FILES # 1 and was a purple sorceress with a Medusa-like head of serpents.


XmurderXmadeXeasyX --

Glad you like the thread!

No, I don’t think the Riddler’s crazy. He has a compulsion to leave clues about his crimes but that’s not really enough to declare someone insane. Someone like Two-Face, who suffers from a multiple personality disorder, or the Joker, who commits crimes and murders based more on whims than logic, is insane but the Riddler isn‘t.

The Riddler’s origin is pretty much as you mentioned. He was born Edward Nigma and was fascinated by the fact that his name -- E. Nigma -- was another word for puzzle. He became obsessed with mastering all kinds of contests and challenges but had to resort to cheating to come out on top. Eventually, petty larceny became boring so Nigma, inspired by Batman, upped the ante and created a costumed persona of his own -- the Riddler! He left challenges specifically addressed to Batman and delighted in the fact that, initially, he was outwitting the Dark Knight. At the end of their first series of battles, the Riddler was nearly killed in the explosion of a glass maze (1948’s DETECTIVE COMICS # 140). He returned two months later to match wits with Batman and Robin again and, this time, ended up in prison (DETECTIVE # 142).

The Riddler wasn’t revived until 1965’s BATMAN # 171 and, legend has it, that was one of the issues that inspired the creation of the Batman TV show. In fact, the first episode of the Batman TV show (on January 12 & 13, 1966) was even based on that issue. A second season episode (February 8 & 9, 1967) was an adaptation of DETECTIVE # 140. The TV series elevated the Riddler into the first tier of Batman’s rogues gallery and he’s made dozens of appearances in comics since then.

THE QUESTION # 26 came up with the idea that the Riddler’s real name was Eddie Nashton and that he’d had it legally changed to E. Nigma. Representational names that match a character’s personality are a staple of popular fiction, of course, from Charles Dickens to Chester Gould and everyone in between. Unfortunately, the Riddler was a rare case of a character whose real name actually INSPIRED his destiny. The Nashton bit fouled that up. Eventually, Chuck Dixon wrote the post-ZERO HOUR version of the Riddler’s origin in 1995’s DETECTIVE COMICS ANNUAL # 8, hewing very close to the origin from ’TEC # 140 and re-establishing the Riddler’s given name as Edward Nigma. (In the Jim Carrey movie and the animated series, the Riddler’s last name was given as Nygma.)

‘TEC ANNUAL also revealed that, in current continuity, Query and Echo first met the Riddler just as he was starting out. They tried to rob HIM and collectively recognized one another as "kindred souls." Query and Echo’s real names, according to BATMAN: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE, are Diedre Vance and Nina Damfino.

For what it’s worth, I really like Frank Gorshin’s spin on the Riddler but you’re right. He’s far more manic than the comics version. And, boy, do I agree with you on Jim Carrey. A real train wreck of a performance. The Animated Series’ take on the Riddler as cool and calculating is more to my taste.

I mentioned a lot of my favorite runs not too long ago but I suppose Steve Englehart’s eight-issue block on DETECTIVE is my overall favorite arc.

Re: The Joker. The version of his origin that you mention (from THE KILLING JOKE), in which the Red Hood story from DETECTIVE # 168 is combined with the back story about his life as a struggling comedian, is as close to definitive as any we’re ever likely to see.

For sheer lack of time, I doubt I’ll be getting back to bios in the foreseeable future but the rogues you mentioned have been duly noted.


Green Hornet --

I have some of these Bat-Bios saved but not all. It’d probably be just as easy to cut and paste them.


MrMGL --

Luckily, TwoFace22 has already compiled a list of what each trainer taught Batman. Here it is:

Henri Ducard (Manhunting, Deduction, Marksmanship)
Tsunetomo (Martial Arts)
Kirigi (Martial Arts)
Chu Chun Li (Martial Arts)
David Cain (Martial Arts)
Willy Doggett (Manhunting)
Dan Mallory (Trailing, PI work)
Harvey Harris (Detective work)
Shao-La (taoism)
? LaSalle (Body-Building)
Frederick Stone (Demolition, Explosives)
? Kingsley (Chemistry)
Mark Jenner (High Speed Driving)
Peter Allison (Gymnastics)
Aurelius Boch (Toxicology)
? Webber (Acids)
? Shastri (Ophidia - snakes)
? Campbell (Electronics)
Unnamed (Knife Throwing) (In 'The Many Deaths Of Batman')
Unnamed Borneo criminal (Savate)
Ted Grant (Pugilism - boxing)
Oliver Queen (Archery)
Max Dodge (Escapology)
Zatara (Escapology)

As for Alfred, he taught Bruce about acting AFTER Bruce returned to Gotham. Leslie doesn’t think she taught Bruce ANYTHING. Otherwise, he’d never have become Batman in the first place. Though I wouldn’t regard her as a teacher, Leslie IS one of the people that Bruce respects the most in the world and she’s given him a different perspective on fighting the ills of society (even if he doesn’t always listen).

Putting all those teachers into a chronology is tricky, especially since many appeared without benefit of so much as a flashback. At some point, though, I do want to dig into the flashbacks of Bruce’s early years and come up with a definitive chronology for the current DCU. At the moment, though, I’ve got far too many outside obligations to even think about it. Someday ...

What you’ve got here is very good, though. Some quick observations:

I don’t regard the HALLOWEEN books as canon (too many discrepancies, like Flass’ death in DARK VICTORY and his survival at Jim Gordon and Sarah Essen’s wedding).

I’m pretty sure Tim Drake is more like fifteen in current continuity, not eighteen.

Mary McGinnis wasn’t one of Batman’s trainers. She was slain during that murder spree because she could have possibly implicated the real killer.

Batman met Julie Madison and fought Clayface I AFTER Robin came along (as per SECRET ORIGINS # 44).

What really complicates Clayface’s history is the presence of Clayface TWO in JLA: YEAR ONE # 2 and 12, set before Robin came along. Here’s my theory:

JLA: YEAR ONE noted that Vandal Savage provided Clayface with the mystic clay so I've theorized that the person he provided it to was aging actor Basil Karlo -- NOT Matt Hagen. Though later captured [# 12], Karlo escaped custody before his powers faded away and exposed his identity. Using make-up, he recreated the role on the "Dread Castle" set and, after Matt Hagen stumbled onto the grotto containing the magic clay, Karlo became obsessed with regaining its power, something he ultimately achieved in DETECTIVE # 604-607's "Mudpack" story. (Needless to say, the LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT story with Matt Hagen is just that -- a legend.)

I’ve actually done a slight bit more research on the chronology of the early Bat-villain appearances but that’s slated for an upcoming Answer Man. I figure Bob would rather have it appear there first.


Hope this helped.

Be careful out there, folks!

John



Mikel Midnight
Member
posted December 01, 2002 01:02 PM

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


And now, here's a few Batman-related parallel worlds, starting and ending with ones that were named by DC --

Mikishawm: I don't agree with all these designations, but I have made note of them on my timelines ... let the readers decide!

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-27*" (named after ANIMAL MAN # 27):
Home of variant versions of Animal Man, Batman, and B'wana Beast and historical divergences such as Hitler's hanging for his war crimes and Edward Kennedy's drowning at Chappaquiddick (ANIMAL MAN # 27-32).


What designates this Earth as separate, and unique to these three characters? There's an alternate Spectre in those issues and you don't include him here.

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-32" (named after GREEN LANTERN # 32):
An Earth similar to Earth-1 but with numerous variances. Among the deviations, Hal Jordan married Carol Ferris early in his Green Lantern career and characters such as Luthor, Robin, Speedy, and the Flash II had origins that differed from their Earth-1 and Earth-2 counterparts. First revealed as a distinct world in GREEN LANTERN [second series] # 32 (Oct., 1964).


I don't understand the common themes to all these Earths. I would designate most of them as obscure Earth-1 stories, or else put the stupider ones on Earth-12. I personally would make Earth-32 out to be the matrimonial Earth, and claim it's where bigamy is also legal and Superman married both Lois and Lana!

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-40" (home of non-canonical Golden Age stories and named after the 1940s):
A world on which Billy Batson became a hero named Captain Thunder. Also the home of a Superboy who was raised in Metropolis and a Wonder Woman who was active during World War Two and participated in several adventures that were similar to those of Earth-2's Diana. By the early 1960s, Bruce Wayne had retired to make way for "the second Batman and Robin team." First seen in BATMAN [first series] # 32/2 and revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).


E. Nelson Bridwell designated this as Earth-2A and I have stuck with this designation. I certainly *don't* think Captain Thunder should be here; I have designated his home as Earth-T which is the home of contradictory stories involving Fawcett-based characters.

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-148" (named after WORLD‘S FINEST # 148):
A world characterized by heroic counterparts of Clayface, Luthor, and Mirror Master and villainous versions of Batman, Flash, and Superman. Existence revealed in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 148. Also seen in THE FLASH [first series] # 174 and SUPER FRIENDS # 23.


I take it you are claiming this is the same as the Mirror Earth? I made the same assumption but I'd like clarification. I note that Superman doesn't have a mirrored S-logo here (Batman's of course is symmetric).

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-178*" (named after WORLD‘S FINEST # 178):
Home of a Superman who lost his powers and adopted the costumed identity of The Nova (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 178, 180). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).


I've read about this story but not read it; I assumed that he got his powers at the end, but evidently not?

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-216" (named after WORLD‘S FINEST # 216):
A world where Superman and Batman each had namesake offspring who often operated as the Super-Sons (WORLD’S FINEST COMICS # 215). Revealed as a distinct parallel world in THE KINGDOM # 2 (February, 1999).


I have followed Mark Grunewald in designating this Earth-E.

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-500" (named after DETECTIVE # 500):
A world with no Paradise Island or Krypton that contained a young Bruce Wayne training to be become his Earth's Batman (DETECTIVE COMICS # 500).


As Enda80 pointed out, I designated this as Earth-5.

Originally posted by Mikishawm:


"EARTH-1278" (named after the month and date -- December, 1978 -- that "Superman The Movie" had its theatrical release):
The home of the theatrical incarnations of DC's heroes. First seen in THE SAGA OF SWAMP THING ANNUAL # 1.


I have avoided speculation about this Earth, as there are just too many incompatible theatrical incarnations ... although limiting the canon to comic adaptions of the film adaptions is a nice approach! Note there there's going to be an upcoming BIRDS OF PREY comic adaption.



Mikel Midnight
Member
posted December 01, 2002 06:26 PM

Whoops, the formatting screwed up in that last quote. And I forgot some.

There was a Batman story in which he was visited for a panel by a plethora of unnamed counterparts, including Deerman and a heroic Owlman. Unfortunately, I don't have the issue or a complete list.

There is the Earth in which Batman encountered Tintin. I have plotted this on http://blaklion.best.vwh.net/timelineFrancais.html and also set some of the French-based Elseworlds there (I propose that Batman on this world is a generational hero a la the Phantom, though Bruce Wayne's parents could still have been struck down in his childhood).

Also, I am plotting out DC's metafictional characters, which gives us an Earth for Night Wizard: http://blaklion.best.vwh.net/timelineJ.html

An even more speculative move, I propose for membership in the Love Syndicate of Dreamworld the Batman described by the black child in "The Batman Nobody Knows".



Eduardo
Member
posted December 02, 2002 12:52 PM

Covering for Bob Rozakis, John Wells a.k.a. Mikishawn wrote an article on what's canon and what´s not in the bat world.
http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/index.htm



Xanadude
Member
posted December 05, 2002 02:02 PM

How many other identities has Batman assumed?
(Not counting his stint as Robin during his training or Sins of Youth AND not counting the "bizarre transformations" into Bat-Baby, Bat-Genie, etc)

Starman has been covered on here.... didn't he also become the Flying Fox in one story? Any others?



Enda80
Member
posted December 06, 2002 03:56 PM

SUPERBOY #182 has a young Bruce Wayne in the identity of the Executioner. However, this story is problematic for Earth-1 continuity, for reasons that I have touched on before.

On Earth-1, he also wore a costume similar to the Robin costume. See the Harvey Harris stories.


Are the Batman/Judge Dredd team-ups in continuity? Although it may seem strange that they took place on another Earth during the Interregnum, that can be explained by saying that Judge Dredd and Judge Death come from a different multiverse.

A multiverse represents a collection of parallel Earths that tend to have certain common elements or history. Earths in the Marvel Multiverse tend to have the Celestials, Galactus, et al.

Universe is a reality/dimension, etc., like for example: Earth-616, Earth-Days of Future Past, the New Universe, the mainstream DC Universe, etc.

Hint: Uni- means "One."

A multiverse is a group of similar realities often separated by a single divergent event, such as Earth-616, Earth-Days of Future Past, etc. To explain further, the presence of a counterpart of Eternity, the Watchers, and the standard cosmic entities would tend to place a reality within that multiverse. What If worlds, etc. fit this group.

Worlds that have a markedly different composition, such as the New Universe, or the DC Universe(s), or for that matter the Image Universe(s), Archie Comics, Dr. Who, etc., etc., etc., who be placed in separate mulitiverses. In some cases, as with many comic companies, there is a group of dimensions within its multiverse. While the New Universe is in a separate Multiverse than Earth-616, it is apparently closely enough affiliated that the Brothers saw fit to include it in the Amalgamation process.

Remember, Multi- means "Many."

The Omniverse is the single collective entity which contains all of the Multiverses. Everything, from the Marvel Multiverses, to the DC Universes, to Fred Flintstone, Archie, and even Earth-Prime (that's the real, non-comic world) would be within the one Omniverse.

Hint: Omni- means "All or Every."

It's not always clear whether to individual universes are within the same Multiverse, and its always up for debate.
http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix/accessam.htm

Incidentally, a side-note: Batman/Judge Dredd:Vendetta in Gotham stated that the next team-up would be Die Laughing due in 1994. In fact, the next team-up was the Ultimate Riddle in 1995, which came out around the same time as Batman Forever - which featured Jim Carrey as the Riddler. Seems to me that they shuffled things, eh?



Xanadude
Member
posted December 06, 2002 06:26 PM

What did the costume of the Executioner look like??? And the Flying Fox??



free2speak
Member
posted December 16, 2002 11:21 AM

Hi Mikishawm,

I was reading the Dixonverse message board and discovered that Chuck intended Tim to be Jewish. Do you know of any back issues I could look at to see what I missed? Thanks!

Here's Chuck Dixon's quote from his message board at http://www.dixonverse.com/

"Would it surprise you to learn that, in my mind, Tim Drake and his father are Jewish? If you were to carefully re-read my stories some of this might be clear to you in hindsight. But I never made it an issue for the readers."



datalore
Member
posted December 17, 2002 12:02 PM

Great Guardians, I had forgotten about this thread myself!

Actually, I'm not sure if this has been answered before, but I came across the Batman/Batman (almost) team-up in B&B #200 while looking up the BATO preview...

(Okay, specfically, I'm trying to place the Golden Age Batman's (as well as Robin and Commissioner Gordon's) appearance in B&B #200...and I've shamelessly asked this on both Tenzil Kim's Unofficial Guide to the DCU, as well as the Golden/Silver Age comicboards...but figure I'll ask here too!)

I've been taking the assumption that Batman & Robin did this during August-September 1955 (keeping the "theme" of celebrating Brave & the Bold, and B&B #1 came out Aug-Sept 1955... I know the 1955 is right, since it happened "28 years ago" and it came out in 1983; and, in those days, even if time was a little questionable towards the end in Earth-1 stories, it was pretty much all "real time" on Earth-2...)

Using the above, it would put the story in B&B #200 as having happened after the three stories in BATMAN #93 and the Batman story in DETECTIVE COMICS #223...(as for the "first time" Batman & Robin beat Brimstone...how about we have that slight flashback take the place of the Batman story in DETECTIVE #215, which ended up being an "Earth-1" Batman story...)

Of course, as always, if anyone has a better idea (or knows of a source on the Golden Age Batman that might have already placed this...feel free to chime in!)

And, as always, go read Bob Roziak's Answerman column (often aided and occasional written by our own wonderful Mikishawm!)



Xanadude
Member
posted December 17, 2002 03:42 PM

And here's yet another for y'all: Joe Potato.

It seemed like the Batbooks got rid of one character (Harvey Bullock) and replaced him with a very similar one (Joe Potato) for no reason. Has Joe been seen in a while?



Xanadude
Member
posted December 18, 2002 09:35 PM

And, to add another bunch of characters to the list:

Have any of the villains that the Huntress faced in her backup stories in WW from the 80s ever made any post-Crisis appearances?

A few of them were quite effective and well conceived: the Earthworm, Tarr and Feather, the Crimelord.....

And is there a listing/synopses of the series?

Thanks



datalore
Member
posted December 19, 2002 11:18 AM

Originally posted by Xanadude:


And, to add another bunch of characters to the list:
Have any of the villains that the Huntress faced in her backup stories in WW from the 80s ever made any post-Crisis appearances?
A few of them were quite effective and well conceived: the Earthworm, Tarr and Feather, the Crimelord.....
And is there a listing/synopses of the series?
Thanks


I know Earthworm was in GUY GARDNER #36 and #38 (amped up by Neron), but none of the rest (unless you count Steve Dayton's Crimelord as a version of Crimelord...)



Enda80
Member
posted December 25, 2002 11:23 PM

http://ourworld.cs.com/argentprime/batman2.htm

has summaries of the Huntress' adventures.

Oh, by the way, thanks for that heads up about Earthworm. I can add to a list I made up: villains who returned post-Crisis in series different than the ones they debuted in. This mostly has to do with characters whose pre-Crisis adventures largely do not exist in any analogous post-Crisis version, such as the Huntress, Supergirl, Wonder Woman, Superman, etc.

Among the ones I came up with:
Dr. Cyber: Pre-Crisis in WONDER WOMAN, returned post-Crisis in POWER COMPANY

Ultra-Humanite: Enemity with Superman erased

Gang, Psi: Supergirl villains

Atomic Skull: Albert Michaels appeared in TEEN TITANS SPOTLIGHT in 1987, no mention of having faced Superman

Angle Man: Debuted in WONDER WOMAN, returned in FLASH cameo

Parasite: A very special case. The pre-Crisis Parasite debuted in SUPERMAN. The post-Crisis Parasite debuted in FIRESTORM. What is interesting is that the post-Crisis Parasite's origin was engineered by Darkseid (in FIRESTORM #58) - who still remembered the pre-Crisis Parasite!



Enda80
Member
posted January 01, 2003 07:57 PM

Ah, a note on the Gentleman Ghost. Good coverage but a caveat; HAWKMAN SPECIAL #1 (1986) established that the Gentleman Ghost who battled Katar Hol on Earth-1 was the same entity as the Ghost who fought Carter Hall earlier on Earth-2. So, that means (A) the listings should be consolidated fro pre-Crisis (B) that origin flashback from ATOM AND HAWKMAN #43 may have taken place on Earth-2!

As to how he crossed from Earth to Earth..... well, as a ghost or other supernatural being, it would be easy for him.

This does raise the question as to whether there was only one afterlife realm (excluding the fiefdoms of gods such as Pluto/Hades and so forth) in the multiverse; someone pointed out that SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING ANNUAL #2 seemed to indicate that, that there was no Hell-1 or Hell-2. Actually, Satan and other demons did show up on various worlds, of course.

In any event, HAWKMAN SPECIAL #1 showed the Gentleman Ghost in a netherworld which was hanuted by the ghosts of recently departed Thanagarians, so this serves as another nod to his being a ghost.



Matches Malone
New Member
posted January 02, 2003 09:20 AM

Originally posted by Xanadude:


It seemed like the Batbooks got rid of one character (Harvey Bullock) and replaced him with a very similar one (Joe Potato) for no reason. Has Joe been seen in a while?

Joe's last appearance was SHADOW OF THE BAT ANNUAL #5. I think Dixon had plans for him at one point, but those never came to fruition.



Enda80
Member
posted January 03, 2003 10:29 PM

Previously, John Wells did a great list of parallel worlds.

Earth-32 (aka Earth-B) appeared, and I must add that Bob Rozakis in an Answer Man column declared that the parallel Earth in ACTION COMICS #399/1 was Earth-B.

Also, a sort of Earth-40 world is the Superman story in ’Look Magazine’ (1943), the two page story where Superman captures Hitler and Stalin. This story was reprinted in GREATEST SUPERMAN STORIES EVER TOLD, and in a collection of Superman newspaper comic strips.



n-man
Member
posted January 06, 2003 03:23 AM

I know that Batman used, in DETECTIVE #105 and #115 (both stories are from Don Cameron), a badge -- a platinum bat with diamonds. When did this badge first app. and in how many stories was it shown?

I know that on the cover of ‘TEC #108, the Bat-Signal appears for the very first time. But when it was first used inside the comic?

Was Professor Carter Nichols seen after the Crisis?



Mikishawm
Member
posted February 08, 2003 06:27 PM

Hi, remember me ?

Other projects continue to keep me away from the boards other than my monthy "Page-By-Page With The Power Company" post but I'm trying to play catch-up this weekend. A few quick responses ...


Mikel Midnight --

Re: Earth-27 (ANIMAL MAN # 27-32): I didn’t attempt to list every hero on this or any of the other Earths I mentioned, just a few representative examples. No slight was intended by the Spectre’s absence.

There aren’t common themes to the various parallel Earths, just different lines of history.

Yep, I considered the stories in WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 148, THE FLASH [first series] # 174, and SUPER FRIENDS # 23 to be set on the same Earth. And, yeah, Superman’s unreversed S-logo DOES slightly foul up that point. (But maybe the symbol stands for something else on that world.)

Correct. At the end of the Nova story (WORLD'S FINEST COMICS # 178, 180), Superman was still powerless and intended to permanently operate under that new name.

Given its close relationship with Earths 1 and 2, I’ll go with calling the ‘TEC # 500 world Earth-5. The original Earth-5 on my list was assigned to WATCHMEN # 1-12, my rationale being that it grew out of Earth-4 (the Charlton heroes’ world). I’ve rechristened the WATCHMEN world as Earth-1959, acknowledging the year that Jon Osterman became Dr. Manhattan and altered the course of history.

Agreed, there are lots of incompatible film versions of DC’s heroes. Even by restricting myself to just the comics adaptations, I still had to create a separate world (Earth-988) for the comics series based on the late-1980s Superboy series. And there’s no way that the SMALLVILLE and BIRDS OF PREY tele-comics will fit on Earth-1278. It’s Earth-1001 for them (and probably all the other Warner/WB TV-based comics of the foreseeable future).


Xanadude --

How many other identities has Batman assumed? Discounting all his impersonations of pre-existing heroes (and villains ... like Matches Malone), I find ...

The Executioner: SUPERBOY [1] # 182
The Flying Fox: ADVENTURE COMICS # 275
Minuteman: SILVER AGE 80-PAGE GIANT # 1
Nightman: WORLD’S FINEST COMICS # 155
Robin I: DETECTIVE COMICS # 226
The Sphinx: STAR SPANGLED COMICS # 93
Starman: DETECTIVE COMICS # 247.

The Flying Fox’s outfit was a purple suit jacket, necktie and pants, a bulky precursor of the utility belt, and a fox-head and pelt as his cape and cowl. There’s a variation of it at the end of SUPERMAN & BATMAN: GENERATIONS II # 4 but it bears only a superficial resemblance to the original. [Byrne’s version is, I think, a bit more dignified.]

The Executioner costume had the same blue-black cowl, cape, briefs, boots et al. of the Batman costume but without the bat-ears and the scallops on the gloves. The shirt and pants were purple.

Joe Potato never appeared outside of Alan Grant’s Bat-stories so, when Grant left, so did Joe. He appeared in DETECTIVE # 594, BATMAN # 460-461, SHADOW OF THE BAT # 40-41 and, as noted, SHADOW OF THE BAT ANNUAL # 5.

Earthworm was indeed the only original Huntress foe to return in the current DCU ... but he was ALSO the only one to get his own WHO’S WHO entry. Let’s face it. Without those old WHO’S WHO issues, an awful lot of minor and one-shot villains would’ve been completely swallowed up by the ravages of time.


Enda80 --

I always felt like the Judge Dredd stories could be canonical for the very reason you mentioned: Dredd and company were coming from another multiverse.


Free2speak --

The detail about Tim and Jack Drake being Jewish is fascinating but I haven’t been able to spot any obvious details in the stories. This is something I’ll keep in mind, though, when I re-read Chuck’s Robin-related stories.


datalore --

Until I get a better look at the Batman stories of the period, your placement of B&B # 200 flashbacks sounds good to me.


n-man --

The platinum badge first appeared in DETECTIVE # 70 (December, 1942) and BATMAN # 19 (October-November, 1943) but the sequence in which it was actually presented to Batman didn’t appear until ‘TEC # 95 (November, 1945). In that one, Commissioner Gordon gave the badge to Batman during a police academy graduation ceremony. Along with ‘TEC # 105 and 115, those are all the appearances of the badge that I know of but probably not all that exist.

Batman was officially recognized by Commissioner Gordon and the GCPD in BATMAN # 7 (October-November, 1941) and the Bat-Signal came along in DETECTIVE # 60 (February, 1942). Outside of DETECTIVE (where it would next appear in # 62, 65, and 68), it took a little while to catch on. The Bat-Signal made its first appearance in WORLD’S FINEST in issue # 6 (Summer, 1942) and didn’t shine in BATMAN itself until # 13 (October-November, 1942). Interestingly, the retroactive JSA origin from 1977’s DC SPECIAL # 29 had Commissioner Gordon summoning Batman to police headquarters in November of 1940.

Professor Carter Nichols, the scientist who sent Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson into the past via hypnosis and -- later -- a time machine, made forty-seven appearances from the 1940s (beginning with 1944’s BATMAN # 24) through the 1980s (ending with 1981’s SUPER FRIENDS # 42 and 1985’s AMERICA VS. THE JUSTICE SOCIETY # 1 & 4). He hasn’t officially appeared in current Batman continuity but he made non-canonical appearances in the Amalgam comic LEGENDS OF THE DARK CLAW # 1 (1996) and the swell retro story in last year’s BATMAN # 600.

CARTER NICHOLS (Earth-Two):
America Vs. The Justice Society # 1, 4
Batman # 24, 32, 36, 38, 43-44, 46, 49, 52, 58-59, 79, 89, 93
Detective Comics # 116, 135, 167, 205
Star Spangled Comics # 71, 73
World's Finest Comics # 42

CARTER NICHOLS (Earth-One):
Adventure Comics # 253
Batman # 98-99, 102, 112, 115, 125, 127, 600
The Brave And The Bold # 171
Detective Comics # 295
Super Friends # 10, 17-18, 26, 29-30, 35, 42
World's Finest Comics # 82, 107, 132, 135, 138

CARTER NICHOLS (Earth-496):
Legends Of The Dark Claw # 1


And that's about it for this post.

Happy Valentine's Day!

John



Hellst0ne
Member
posted February 24, 2003 05:56 PM

Note to the elders of this thread: A character named Mickey Schaum makes an appearance in this month's POWER COMPANY #13. Check it out.

/ola



dnewton
Member
posted March 27, 2003 12:15 AM

Re:The Condiment King.
In an issue of BIRDS OF PREY, Oracle tells Robin III, Black Canary II, and Blue Beetle that she (as Batgirl I) and Dick Grayson (as Robin I) defeated Condiment King.



InterKnight81
New Member
posted April 06, 2003 10:58 AM

Hi Miki... I'm new, but I've been reading this thread for a while... (No activity in a while... Hmmmmm...)

Anyway, I don't know if you've ever followed ‘Big Bang Comics’, but if you have, how about a profile on their Bat-clone, the Knight Watchman?




< BACK